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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 20 20 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 12 12 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 8 8 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 8 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 6 6 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 5 5 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 4 4 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 3 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
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rs. C., and daughters. Her sons are in the army, and being a refugee, she says she must follow the army, and go where she can reach them if they are wounded. We found C. busily dividing her year's supply of bacon among the servants, that each may take care of his own. As the enemy never regards locks, she knows that her meat-house will be unsafe; we secreted two guns, which had been inadvertently left, and returned, feeling desolate, but thankful that our gentlemen were safely off. May 22d, 1862. Papers from Richmond to-day. We are not yet in the enemy's lines. May 23d, 1862. The enemy's pickets gradually encroaching upon us. A squad of their cavalry has been in the Hanover Town lane all day; five or six lancers, with their red streamers, rode slowly by our gate this evening. C. encountered them in her walk home, and had a conversation with an officer, Major Doyle, who made many professions of friendship! May 24th, 1862. We were aroused this morning at an earl
May 22d, 1862. Papers from Richmond to-day. We are not yet in the enemy's lines.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Manassas to Seven Pines. (search)
d a detachment attacked Hatton's Confederate brigade, which was in observation near Savage's Station. The detachment was driven back, and Hatton's object having been accomplished (to learn whether the enemy had crossed the stream), he was recalled. I was advised to hold that position with the army, but preferred to let the enemy advance, which would increase the interval between his left and the right, which was beyond the Chickahominy. McDowell's corps of 40,000 men McDowell says, May 22d, 1862, Official Records, Vol. XII., Part III., p. 214, that he would require subsistence for 38,000 men. This included both effectives and non-effectives. A fair deduction would leave McDowell about 35,000 combatants, to compute by the basis on which the Confederate generals always estimated their strength.--Editors. was then at Fredericksburg, observed by a division under Brigadier-General J. R. Anderson; and a large Confederate brigade, under Brigadier-General Branch, was at Gordonsville.
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 19: battle of the forts and capture of New Orleans. (search)
r name with one of the most brilliant naval achievements on record, and to your able assistance with the flotilla is Flag-officer Farragut much indebted for the successful results he has accomplished. To yourself and the officers and seamen of the mortar flotilla, the department extends its congratulations. I am, respectfully, &c., Gideon Welles. Commander David D. Porter, Commanding United States Mortar Flotilla, Gulf of Mexico. Coast Survey reports. Treasury Department, May 22, 1862. Sir — At the instance of the Superintendent of the Coast Survey, I have the honor to transmit herewith a copy of the journal of Assistant F. H. Gerdes, United States Coast Survey, showing the services rendered to the fleet under command of Flag-officer Farragut, United States Navy, and to the mortar fleet under command of Captain D. D. Porter, United States Navy. I am, very respectfully, S. P. Chase, Secretary of the Treasury. Hon. Gideon Welles. Secretary of the Navy. Extract
adquarters in explanation of certain paragraphs in his report. Respectfully, D. C. Buell, Major-General, Commanding. Assistant Adjutant-General, Headquarters Department of the Mississippi. [inclosure no. 1.] Cumberland Ford, May 22, 1862. Colonel Fry: My column is on the march. The advance guard has passed the Cumberland. George W. Morgan, Brigadier-General, Commanding. [inclosure no. 2.] Cumberland Ford, May 22, 1862. Manjor-General Buell: A reliable scouMay 22, 1862. Manjor-General Buell: A reliable scout has just come in. The enemy has withdrawn from Big Creek Gap and will reach Cumberland Gap to-day. Reliable letter from Clinton also informs me that the road between Clinton and Knoxville is lined with troops coming this way. It is probable that the enemy is concentrating his entire force in East Tennessee upon my immediate front. The march of to-day will be executed as before ordered, but it may become imprudent to pass mountains unless a strong diversion be made upon Cleveland or Chattanoo
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), April 29-June 10, 1862.-advance upon and siege of Corinth, and pursuit of the Confederate forces to Guntown, Miss. (search)
e moved up yesterday to within 2 miles of enemy's works, driving back their advance guards, which made strong resistance, upon the Purdy road. Major-General Sherman's division (our extreme right) lost 8 killed, 31 wounded. Loss in other divisions very slight. The enemy apparently waiting our attack upon his works. Country is so wooded and marshy that we are obliged to feel our way step by step. H. W. Halleck, Major-General, Commanding. Hon. E. M. Stanton. camp, Corinth road, May 22. 1862. Daily skirmishing between our reconnoitering parties and the enemy. General Buell lost 25 men killed and wounded yesterday. Country in our front marshy and densely wooded. 1 hear nothing of the Kansas troops. Have they been ordered here? All my re-enforcements will be here in about four days. Beyond that I have nothing to expect from this department, and if none from other sources, there will be no use in further delaying an attack. The Sanitary Commission and State Governors ca
e-de-Camp. headquarters Third Army Corps, May 22, 1862--2.30 a. m. General Beauregard: General:urned; the other has not. Corinth, Miss., May 22, 1862--4.30 a. m. Maj. Gen. Leonidas Polk, PresenYour obedient servant, G. T. Beauregard. May 22, 1862--1 p. m. [General Beauregard:] dear Gene guided. Yours, truly, Braxton Bragg. May 22, 1862--4.15 p. m. [General Beauregard:] my deaon Bragg. headquarters Army of the West, May 22, 1862--8 a. m. General Bragg, Commanding, Front: ours, &c., Earl Van Dorn. Corinth, Miss., May 22, 1862--10 a. m. Major-General Van Dorn, Near GlenE. Van D. General Polk's Station, Miss., May 22, 1862--10.40 a. m. General Beauregard: My own I await orders. L. Polk, Major-General. May 22, 1862. General: I send you the accompanying pr. I will investigate the matter further. May 22, 1862. General G. T. Beauregard, Commanding, Corit Division, First Corps, Army of the Miss., May 22, 1862. Maj. George Williamson, Assistant Adjutant[2 more...]
82 captured or missing. The reenlisted men received the usual veteran furlough of one month, and went home in April, 1864. Returning, they arrived at Decatur, Ala., on May 14th, after which the regiment was stationed at Huntsville, Ala., at Kingston, Ga., and at other places, until August, 1864, when it was mustered out. The recruits and reenlisted men who were retained in the field, were transferred to the Fifth Iowa Cavalry. Colonel Worthington was killed on the picket line at Corinth, May 22, 1862, having been shot by mistake. Sixth Iowa Infantry. Hicks's Brigade — W. S. Smith's Division--Sixteenth Corps. (1) Col. John A. Mcdowell. (2) Col. John M. Corse; Bvt. Major-Gen. (3) Col. William H. Clune. companies. killed and died of wounds. died of disease, accidents, in Prison, &c. Total Enrollment. Officers. Men. Total. Officers. Men. Total. Field and Staff 2   2       14 Company A   14 14   15 15 104   B 1 14 15   14 14 109   C 2 14 16   17
ll never be put right without it. I am, sir, with great respect, your ob't servant, Josiah Tatnall, Flag-Officer Commanding. Hon. S. R. Mallory, Secretary of Navy. Findings of the Court of Inquiry. C. S. Navy Department, Richmond, June 11. The Court of Inquiry convoked by the order of this Department of the twentieth ultimo, whereof French Forrest, Captain in the navy of the confederate States, is president, and which court convened at the city of Richmond on the twenty-second day of May, 1862, to investigate and inquire into the destruction of the steamer Virginia, and report the same, together with their opinion as to the necessity of destroying her, and particularly whether any, and what disposition could have been made of the vessel, have found as follows: The court, having heard the statement read submitted by Flag-Officer Tatnall, was cleared for deliberation, and, after mature consideration, adopted the following report: The court, after a full and careful
s and two regiments along the edge of a field which lies to the east of Russell's house. This house is now the advance picket-station in our front, and I have a chain of sentinels round by the right to a point on the Purdy and Corinth road, where it joins on to the pickets of Gen. McClernand. There was no loss sustained by Gens. Hurlbut or Denver's commands in their flank movements on Russell's; but the loss in Gen. Morgan L. Smith's brigade was pretty heavy--ten killed and thirty-one wounded, a list of whom will accompany this report. The confederates left twelve dead on the ground, whom we buried. They removed their wounded, of which many traces were on the ground and in the house. Among their dead was one captain and two lieutenants. We took only one prisoner, whom I sent to the Provost-Marshal. I have the honor to be your obedient servant, W. T. Sherman, Brig.-Gen. Commanding Division. Headquarters Department Mississippi, Camp Corinth Roads, Mississippi, May 22, 1862.
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