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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 11 11 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 9 9 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6 6 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 6 6 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 4 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 4 4 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 4 4 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 4 4 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 4 4 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 4 4 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraphs. (search)
d down to posterity the form and features of our noble leaders. Contributions to the archives of the SOCIETY continue to come in. We have space to acknowledge only the following recent contributions. From-- Judge Thomas C. Manning, Alexandria, Louisiana.--The Journal and Ordinances of the Secession Convention of Louisiana.--Special message of the Governor of Louisiana, in December, 1860, commonly known as the Secession message. --Proclamation of the Governor of Louisiana of May 24th, 1862, on hearing of the celebrated order of General Butler, issued in New Orleans, directing that the ladies of that city should be, under certain circumstances, treated as women of the town. --Reports of T. C. Manning and other commissioners appointed by the Governor of Louisiana upon the atrocities committed by the Federal troops under General Banks during the invasion of Western Louisiana in 1863 and 1864.--Copy of a newspaper printed in Louisiana in October, 1862, on wall paper, showing t
kful that our gentlemen were safely off. May 22d, 1862. Papers from Richmond to-day. We are not yet in the enemy's lines. May 23d, 1862. The enemy's pickets gradually encroaching upon us. A squad of their cavalry has been in the Hanover Town lane all day; five or six lancers, with their red streamers, rode slowly by our gate this evening. C. encountered them in her walk home, and had a conversation with an officer, Major Doyle, who made many professions of friendship! May 24th, 1862. We were aroused this morning at an early hour, by the servants rushing in, exclaiming: The house is surrounded by Yankees, and they are coming into the house. I rushed to the window, and there they were. An officer in the front porch, and a squad of cut-throat-looking fellows on the steps; while a number, with their red streamers and lances, were dashing hither and thither; some at the stable, some at the kitchen, others around the servants' quarters and at the barn, while the lane
May 24th, 1862. We were aroused this morning at an early hour, by the servants rushing in, exclaiming: The house is surrounded by Yankees, and they are coming into the house. I rushed to the window, and there they were. An officer in the front porch, and a squad of cut-throat-looking fellows on the steps; while a number, with their red streamers and lances, were dashing hither and thither; some at the stable, some at the kitchen, others around the servants' quarters and at the barn, while the lane was filled with them. Dr. T. had spent the night with little L., who is ill with scarlet fever. I knocked at his door, and asked him to go down and see what the people wanted. We dressed as rapidly as possible. C. and M. had been up all night with L., and were soon ready to go down. They quickly returned, to say that the officer was Colonel Rush, of Philadelphia, and demanded that my little son Edward should be sent down immediately. It was in vain that they told him that E. was
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 15: the Army of the Potomac on the Virginia Peninsula. (search)
and Trimble, the Maryland line, consisting of the First Maryland and Brockenborough's battery, under General George H. Stewart, and the Second and Sixth Virginia cavalry, under Colonel Flournoy. was rapidly making his way toward Winchester. It was Jackson's intention to cut Banks off from re-enforcements and capture or disperse his troops. Banks had perceived his danger too soon, and with his usual energy and skill he resumed his flight down the valley at nine o'clock the next morning, May 24, 1862. his train in front, escorted by cavalry and infantry, and with a rear-guard or covering force of cavalry and six pieces of artillery, under the command of General John P. Hatch. The vanguard was led by Colonel Dudley Donnelly, and the center by Colonel George H. Gordon. Just as the column had passed Cedar Creek, three miles from Strasburg, word came that the train had been attacked at Middletown, two miles farther on. The news was instantly followed by a host of frightened fugitives,
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 16: the Army of the Potomac before Richmond. (search)
midable resistance to the passage of the right wing. In a review of the Peninsula campaign, Barnard says, No very extensive work was anticipated, as the bottom lands were quite dry, and no inundation had yet occurred, or was anticipated. General McClellan was not waiting for the bridges, but the bridges were waiting for General McClellan. the weather was not very unfavorable, and nothing seemed to offer an excuse for an hour's delay. The Commander-in-Chief had been promptly informed May 24, 1862. from Washington of the reasons and the necessity of countermanding the order for McDowell to move on from Fredericksburg to join him, and he had as usual sent back a complaining remonstrance, and charges of a withholding of troops from him. Nevertheless he issued that order of great promise. May 25. He had said to the Secretary of War, ten days before, I will fight the enemy, whatever their force may be, with whatever force we may have; and the Secretary could see no reasons for a chang
with troops coming this way. It is probable that the enemy is concentrating his entire force in East Tennessee upon my immediate front. The march of to-day will be executed as before ordered, but it may become imprudent to pass mountains unless a strong diversion be made upon Cleveland or Chattanooga by General Mitchel. Will the interests of the service permit such a diversion to be made? George W. Morgan, Brigadier-General, Commanding. [inclosure no. 3.] Cumberland Ford, May 24, 1862. Col. J. B. Fry: Col. A. Jamison [?], Cumberland Gap, has been re-enforced by a brigade of four regiments of infantry, one battery of artillery, and 400 cavalry, and a brigade has just arrived at Big Creek Gap from Knoxville. Kirby Smith is again at the former gap, the defense of which has been increased since our last-received reconnaissance. Two regiments from Virginia, probably forced back by the advance of Cox, have reached Knoxville, and the enemy has withdrawn the bulk of his f
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), April 29-June 10, 1862.-advance upon and siege of Corinth, and pursuit of the Confederate forces to Guntown, Miss. (search)
e they been ordered here? All my re-enforcements will be here in about four days. Beyond that I have nothing to expect from this department, and if none from other sources, there will be no use in further delaying an attack. The Sanitary Commission and State Governors carry away troops faster than I can recruit. Men only slightly unwell or feigning sickness are carried away without any authority. H. W. Halleck, Major-General. Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of lWar. War Department, May 24, 1862. Major-General Halleck, Near Corinth, Miss.: Several dispatches from Assistant Secretary Scott and one from Gov ernor Morton, asking re-enforcements for you, have been received. I beg you to be assured we do the best we can. I mean to cast no blame when I tell you each of our commanders along our line from Richmond to Corinth supposes himself to be confronted by numbers superior to his own. Under this pressure we thinned the line on the Upper Potomac, until yesterday it was broken at
May 19-23, 1862.--expedition down the Mississippi River to Fort Pillow, Tenn. Report of Brig. Gen. Isaac F. Quinby, U. S. Army, commanding District of the Mississippi. headquarters District of the Mississippi, Columbus, Ky., May 24, 1862. Captain: I have the honor to submit for the information of the major-general commanding the following report: On the 19th instant I proceeded to the flotilla above Fort Pillow with such troops as could safely be withdrawn for a short time from the several posts within this district. I was induced to do this on representations made me that there was a very small rebel force in and about Fort Pillow, and that our troops already there, under the command of Colonel Fitch, needed to be only slightly re-enforced to enable us to make a demonstration by land, which, in connection with an attack by our gun and mortar boats, would insure a speedy surrender of the rebel works. The force I took with me consisted of eight companies Forty-sev
By command of General Beauregard: Geo. Wm. Brent, Acting Chief of Staff. headquarters Thirteenth Arkansas regiment, May 24, 1862. Brigadier-General Stewart: sir: My regiment was ordered on picket duty on last Thursday evening. I was posted on t. Respectfully referred. A. P. Stewart, Brigadier-General. headquarters Department of East Tennessee, Knoxville, May 24, 1862. Brig. Gen. S. M. Barton, Commanding Fourth Brigade, Powel's Valley: General: I am directed by the major-general covant, E. Cunningham, Acting Aide-de-Camp. General orders, no. 54.headquarters Western Department, Corinth, Miss., May 24, 1862. I. All newspaper and other correspondents are hereby ordered to leave this post by the first train, nor will they d: Geo. Wm. Brent, Acting Chief of Staff. General orders, no. 55.headquarters Western Department, Corinth, Miss., May 24, 1862. The general commanding the forces desires to call the attention of the army to the insubordinate conduct of the fo
army confronting him. But his astonishment, his agony of disappointment, may well be imagined when all these confident expectations were broken to pieces by the crushing despatch received at a later hour of the same day, which ran thus:-- May 24, 1862, From Washington, 4 P. M. In consequence of General Banks's critical position, I have been compelled to suspend General McDowell's movements to join you. The enemy are making a desperate push upon Harper's Ferry; and we are trying, to throwends upon the celerity and vigor of your movements. To this General McDowell made a reply in writing, of which the principal and material portion is as follows :-- Headquarters, Department of the Rappahannock, opposite Fredericksburg, May 24, 1862. His Excellency the President:-- I obeyed your order immediately, for it was positive and urgent; and perhaps, as a subordinate, there I ought to stop; but I trust I may be allowed to say something in relation to the subject, especially in
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