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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 26 26 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 17 17 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 7 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 7 7 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 7 7 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 5 5 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 4 4 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 3 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 3 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 3 3 Browse Search
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Gordon Granger, whom I knew slightly then, and who had been the former colonel of the regiment, first suggested the appointment. At all events, on the morning of May 27, 1862, Captain Russell A. Algerrecently Governor of Michigan-accompanied by the quartermaster of the regiment, Lieutenant Frank Walbridge, arrived at General Halleck's headquarters and delivered to me this telegram: General orders no. 148.[By Telegraph.] Military Dept. of Michigan, Adjutant-General's Office, Detroit, May 25, 1862. Captain Philip H. Sheridan, U. S. Army, is hereby appointed Colonel of the Second Regiment Michigan Cavalry, to rank from this date. Captain Sheridan will immediately assume command of the regiment. By order of the Commander-in-Chief, Jno. Robertson, Adjutant-General. I took the order to General Halleck, and said that I would like to accept, but he was not willing I should do so until the consent of the War Department could be obtained. I returned to my tent much disap
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 6.38 (search)
2d Ohio): k, 6; w, 50; m, 1=57. Total loss: killed, 26; wounded, 227; missing, 3 = 256. General Schenck says ( Official Records, XII., Pt. I., pp. 462, 463), that he brought into the field an aggregate of only 1300 infantry, besides De Beck's battery . . . and about 250 of the 1st Battalion Connecticut Cavalry. . . . Adding to the 1768 of Milroy's brigade about 500 of the 82d Ohio, which was the number in action, the entire force we had engaged was 2268. Banks's command, May 23d-25th 1862. Major-General Nathaniel P. Banks. first division, Brig.-Gen. Alpheus S. Williams. First Brigade, Col. Dudley Donnelly: 5th Conn., Lieut.-Col. George D. Chapman; 28th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Edwin F. Brown; 46th Pa., Col. Joseph F. Knipe; 1st Md., Col. John R. Kenly (w and c). Brigade loss: k, 17; w, 98; m, 735 = 850. Third Brigade, Col. George H. Gordon: 2d Mass., Lieut.-Col. George L. Andrews; 29th Pa., Col. John K. Murphy (c), Capt. Samuel M. Zulich; 27th Ind., Col. Silas Colgrove; 3d Wi
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The Union Army. (search)
2d Ohio): k, 6; w, 50; m, 1=57. Total loss: killed, 26; wounded, 227; missing, 3 = 256. General Schenck says ( Official Records, XII., Pt. I., pp. 462, 463), that he brought into the field an aggregate of only 1300 infantry, besides De Beck's battery . . . and about 250 of the 1st Battalion Connecticut Cavalry. . . . Adding to the 1768 of Milroy's brigade about 500 of the 82d Ohio, which was the number in action, the entire force we had engaged was 2268. Banks's command, May 23d-25th 1862. Major-General Nathaniel P. Banks. first division, Brig.-Gen. Alpheus S. Williams. First Brigade, Col. Dudley Donnelly: 5th Conn., Lieut.-Col. George D. Chapman; 28th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Edwin F. Brown; 46th Pa., Col. Joseph F. Knipe; 1st Md., Col. John R. Kenly (w and c). Brigade loss: k, 17; w, 98; m, 735 = 850. Third Brigade, Col. George H. Gordon: 2d Mass., Lieut.-Col. George L. Andrews; 29th Pa., Col. John K. Murphy (c), Capt. Samuel M. Zulich; 27th Ind., Col. Silas Colgrove; 3d Wi
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 15: the Army of the Potomac on the Virginia Peninsula. (search)
ll. was on the alert, and at daylight his troops were in battle order. Colonel Gordon, commanding the right, was strongly posted on a ridge, a little south of the city, and Colonel Donnelly was in charge of the left. Near the center, the troops were well sheltered from their foes by stone walls. General Hatch (who was cut off at Middletown), with Tompkins's cavalry, had rejoined the army just in time to participate in the battle. The battle opened furiously in front of Winchester. May 25, 1862. Ewell had placed a heavy body of troops on the Berryville road, to prevent re-enforcements reaching Banks from Harper's Ferry, and regiments were heavily massed on the National right, with the evident intention of turning it. This danger was so boldly and bravely met, that the Confederates were kept in check for five hours by a steady and most destructive fire. , One regiment, says Banks in his report, is represented, by persons present during the action, and after the field was evacu
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 16: the Army of the Potomac before Richmond. (search)
erations on the flank of the great army made the sum of its action. That army, fully prepared for an instant forward movement, and eager to perform it, not only lay passive, but was dangerously severed by the fickle Chickahominy, I have two corps [Keyes's and Heintzelman's] across the Chickahominy, within six miles of Richmond: the others on this side [left] at other crossings within same distance, and ready to cross when bridges are completed. --McClellan's dispatch to the President, May 25, 1862. whose power for mischief, when fed by rains, the commander was constantly setting forth. Instead of moving his whole force upon the works, which he did not consider formidable, he thought it best only to order a part of General Fitz-John Porter's corps (the Fifth) to Hanover Court-House, to secure his menaced right flank, and keep the way open for McDowell to join him. This detachment moved by way of Mecnanicsville, at three o'clock on the morning of the 27th, General W. H. Emory in the
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), April 29-June 10, 1862.-advance upon and siege of Corinth, and pursuit of the Confederate forces to Guntown, Miss. (search)
his own. Under this pressure we thinned the line on the Upper Potomac, until yesterday it was broken at heavy loss to us, and General Banks put in great peril out of which he is not yet extricated, and may be actually captured. We need men to repair this breach, and have them not at hand. My dear general, I feel justified to rely very much on you. I believe you and the brave officers and men with you can and will get the victory at Corinth. A. Lincoln. Halleck's headquarters, May 25, 1862-6 p. m. I have asked for no re-enforcements, but only whether any were to be sent to me. If any were to be sent, I would wait for them; if not, I would venture an attack. We are now in immediate presence of the enemy, and the battle may occur at any moment. I have every confidence that we shall succeed, but dislike to run any risk, and therefore have waited to ascertain if any more troops can be hoped for. Permit me to remark that we are operating upon too many points. Richmond and
nalty due to their commission. By command of General Beauregard: Geo. Wm. Brent, Acting Chief of Staff. Corinth, May 25, 1862. General S. Cooper, Adjutant and Inspector General: To prevent confusion, cannot the Western Department extend overof Mississippi and Alabama? Prompt action is required. G. T. Beauregard. headquarters Western Department, Corinth, May 25, 1862. Maj. Eugene E. Mclean, Chief Quartermaster Western Department: Major: Owing to the difficulty of procuring clothin. I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant George Wm. Brent, [Acting Chief of Staff.] Sunday night, May 25, 1862. General Beauregard, Commanding, &c.: dear General: I have thought it proper to reduce my views to writing on the sst desire to serve you and our cause, I remain, very truly, your friend, W. J. Hardee. [Inclosure.]Corinth, Miss., May 25, 1862. General G. T. Beauregard, Commanding, &c.: The situation at Corinth requires that we should attack the enemy at on
yed a quantity of arms. The contagion of panic spread to Catlett's Station, where was General Duryea with four regiments. He hastened to Centreville, and telegraphed to Washington for help. The rumors were swelled and magnified on their way to the capital: the authorities there were thrown into a most unnecessary fright, and telegraphic despatches, pale with the hue of fear, were sent on the wings of lightning all over the land. Of these the following is a specimen:-- Washington, May 25, 1862. To the Governor of Massachusetts. Intelligence from various quarters leaves no doubt that the enemy, in great force, are marching on Washington. You will please organize and forward immediately all the militia and volunteer force in your State. Edwin M. Stanton, Secretary of War. It was under the influence of the apprehensions occasioned by the report of General Jackson's movements that the President had telegraphed to General McClellan, on the 24th of May, as we have before sta
2 1 Brandy Station, Oct. 11, 1863 3 Stony Creek, June 29, 1864 9 Middletown, May 24, 1862 3 Rapidan, Feb. 3, 1864 1 In action, July 2, 1864 1 Winchester, May 25, 1862 1 Richmond, Mch. 1, 1864 4 Leetown, Aug. 25, 1864 4 Milford, June 30, 1862 1 Richmond, Mch. 2, 1864 1 Front Royal, Sept. 21, 1864 1 Orange C. H., Aug. 2,vice immediately commenced. It formed part of a cavalry brigade, under General John P. Hatch, with which it took an active part in the fighting at Winchester, May 25, 1862, and on Banks's retreat. In these operations the regiment, acting as a rear guard, lost 105 men, captured or missing, in addition to their killed and wounded.recruited in that city and in its vicinity. On arriving at Washington it was assigned to Banks's Corps, and was under fire, for the first time, at Winchester, May 25, 1862, where five dismounted companies were engaged. During the Antietam campaign it served in Pleasanton's Cavalry Division, having previously distinguished itself
-- 6 50 1 57 Russell House, Miss             May 17, 1862.             8th Missouri Sherman's ---------- 10 30 -- 40 Princeton, W. Va.             May 17, 1862.             37th Ohio Cox's ---------- 13 45 -- 58 Searcy Landing, Ark.             May 19, 1862.             17th Missouri ------------ ---------- 15 26 -- 41 Port Royal, Va.             May 23, 1862.             1st Maryland Williams's ---------- 14 43 535 592 Winchester, Va.             May 25, 1862.             2d Massachusetts Williams's ---------- 13 47 80 140 Hanover Court House, Va.             May 27, 1862.             25th New York Morell's Fifth 28 79 51 158 44th New York Morell's Fifth 27 59 -- 86 Fair Oaks, Va.             May 31--June 1, 1862.             61st Pennsylvania Couch's Fourth 68 152 43 263 5th New Hampshire Richardson's Second 26 147 7 180 64th New York Ri
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