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Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 15 15 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 10 10 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 7 7 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 7 7 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 5 5 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 5 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 3 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 3 3 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 2 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 2 2 Browse Search
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atitude to Almighty God for His mercies rises higher each day. To Him, and to the valor of our troops, a nation's gratitude is due. (Signed) Robert E. Lee. Pope had attained a place in history as a great falsifier long before assuming command of the Army of Virginia, as documents regarding his operations in the West fully demonstrate. Respecting Beauregard's retreat from Corinth, General Halleck thus telegraphed to Washington, on the strength of Pope's reports: Headquarters, June 4th, 1862. General Pope, with forty thousand men, is thirty miles south of Corinth, pushing the enemy hard. He already reports ten thousand prisoners and deserters from the enemy; and fifteen thousand stand of arms captured. Thousands of the enemy are throwing away their arms. A farmer says, that when Beauregard learned that Colonel Elliot had cut the railroad on his line of retreat he became frantic, and told his men to save themselves the best way they could.: We have captured nine
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 11: operations in Southern Tennessee and Northern Mississippi and Alabama. (search)
ve them from it. After a very severe skirmish near Jasper, in which Colonel Hambright led the Nationals, the Confederates were routed and dispersed, leaving as spoils their ammunition and commissary wagons with supplies; also arms scattered along the pathway of their flight, and twelve prisoners. Adams escaped without his hat, sword, or horse, borrowing one of the latter from a negro on which to fly. Negley lost two killed and seven wounded. Report of General Negley to General Mitchel, June 4, 1862. But one of the most important of the expeditions sent out by Mitchel, and, indeed, one of the most daring of the war, was the secret one, already alluded to, sent to break up the railway between Chattanooga and Atlanta. This expedition was composed of twenty-two picked men, Two of these (Andrews and Campbell) were civilians, and citizens of Kentucky; the remainder were soldiers, selected from the Second, Twenty-first, and Thirty-third Ohio regiments of volunteers, Sill's brigade.
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), Platform Novelties. (search)
edings of the anniversary week. in Boston. They will prove to him, we think, as they have certainly proved to us, that hereafter, whatever may happen, the Slaveholders must look to some less respectable quarter than that of the Northern Churches for sympathy and succor. When this war closes, it will close upon the Northern people as thoroughly united upon the basis of a general moral principle as ever were the Slaveholders upon the lower ground of an abased self-interest. The future holds in itself good hap and evil, but whether it shall bring the sweet or the bitter, there are certain questions which will be no longer vexed in the Northern States. Very long we have been in coming to this point, and very tardy in our recognition of the simplest verities; but now there can be no footsteps backward. The Rebels have called for the previous question. Henceforth serious debate upon fundamentals is impossible, for Freedom has been vindicated by her bitterest enemies. June 4, 1862.
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 37: operations of the East Gulf Squadron to October, 1863. (search)
eroic conduct of Master Hoffner and men. tribute to gallant volunteers. destruction of important salt works by boat's crew from steamer Somerset. Tahoma and Adela shell Confederate batteries. destruction of two blockade-running steamers in Hillsboro River. blockade-running broken up. list of vessels composing east Gulf Squadron under Acting-Rear-Admiral Bailey. list of officers. Acting Rear-Admiral Theodorus Bailey was appointed to the command of the East Gulf squadron on the 4th of June, 1862. The Navy Department had found an opportunity to reward this gallant officer for his services at New Orleans, and although no important military or naval movements were going on within the limits of this command, it was the only way in which the Secretary of tile Navy could show his high appreciation of Bailey's gallantry and devotion to his country's service. The limits of this command extended along the Florida Peninsula from Cape Canaveral on the east, to Pensacola on the west
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), April 29-June 10, 1862.-advance upon and siege of Corinth, and pursuit of the Confederate forces to Guntown, Miss. (search)
Halleck, Major-General, Commanding. Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War. Washington, June 4, 1862. Your glorious dispatch has just been received, and I have sent it into every State. The r. Edwin M. Stanton, Secretary of War. Major-General Halleck, Corinth. Washington, June 4, 1862. Your dispatch of to-day to Secretary of War received. Thanks for the good news it bringscoln. Major-General Halleck, Halleck's Headquarters, Corinth. Halleck's headquarters, June 4, 1862. General Pope's dispatch of yesterday assured me that the enemy was rapidly retreating soung enemy, scattering in all directions. John Pope, Major-General. Washington, D. C., June 4, 1862. The following dispatch was received this afternoon at the War Department: Halleck's headquarters, June 4, 1862. Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War: General Pope, with 40,000 men, is 30 miles south of Florence, pushing the enemy hard. He already reports 10,000 prisoners and deserte
June 4, 1862.-skirmish at Sweeden's Cove, near Jasper, Tenn. Reports. No. 1.-Maj. Gen. Ormsby M. Mitchel, U. S. Army. No. 2.-Brig. Gen. James S. Negley, U. S. Army. No. 3.-Maj. Gen. E. Kirby Smith, C. S. Army. No. 1.-reports of Maj. Gen. Ormsby M. Mitchel, U. S. Army. Booneville, June 8, 1862. General Mitchel telegraphs as follows: June 8.-On Thursday General Negley succeeded in surprising the rebel General Adams, and after a sharp fight routed and scattered the enemy uffice to relieve Eastern Tennessee. Have you any orders O. M. Mitchel, Major-General. Hon. E. M. Stanton. No. 2.-reports of Brig. (Gen. James S. Negley, U. S. Army. headquarters United States forces, Sweeden's Cove, East Tenn., June 4, 1862. Sir: By making a forced march of 20 miles over a rugged and almost impassable mountain road and by capturing the enemy's pickets we succeeded in completely surprising General Adams' command of rebel cavalry encamped at the foot of the moun
boat arrived to-day. D. Leadbetter. Baldwyn, June 4, 1862. Maj. Gen. Leonidas Polk, Comdg. 1st Corps, Army Army of the Mississippi, Near Williams', Miss., June 4, 1862. General: I have the honor to acknowledge theral. headquarters Western Department, Baldwyn, June 4, 1862. Major-General Van Dorn, Commanding Army of the Brent, Acting Chief of Staff. Tupelo, Miss., June 4, 1862--12 m. General Beauregard, Commanding: Generaservant Jno. Pegram Colonel, &c. Fort Pillow. June 4, 1862. (Received June 5, 1862.) General Ruggles: I ers, no. 62. Hdqrs. Western Department, Baldwyn, June 4, 1862. * * * * * * * V. The general commanding takheadquarters Dabb's House, [Near Richmond, Va.], June 4, 1862. Maj. Gen. E. Kirby Smith, Commanding, &c., Knoxervant, R. E. Lee, General. Knoxville, Tenn., June 4, 1862. Major McLin, Commanding Post, Kingston, Tenn.: Assistant Adjutant-General. Knoxville, Tenn., June 4, 1862. Brig. Gen. D. Leadbetter, Chattanooga, Tenn.:
: James B. Fry, Assistant Adjutant-General, Chief of Staff. headquarters, June 4, 1862. Maj. Gen. D. O. Buell: You will have f get guides from General Pope's cond on their road to Danville. H. W. Halleck, Major-General. headquarters, June 4, 1862. Major-General Buell: Pope's forces are nearly all past Danville and I sul send others to meet you. H. W. Halleck, Major-General. Corinth, Miss., [June 4, 1862]. Major-General Buell: I directed General Wood to push forward a brigade pening communication to Mitchel. H. W. Halleck, Major-General. Nashville, June 4, 1862. Col. J. B. Fry: There is an order issued by you that none except officerral Boyle has published his first general order, assuming the command, dated June 4, 1862, but I did not receive a copy of the order which he acts upon until to-day, ttention to a dispatch published in the newspapers, dated at Corinth, Miss., June 4, 1862, purporting to have been sent by you to the Secretary of War, and containing
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 9: taking command of a Southern City. (search)
of the vessels, after a full and intelligent examination. And as the health and lives of so many would be dependent upon the truth of those reports, he was notified that any remissness in his duty would be punished with the heaviest punishment known. The next requirement that complicated the matter was the necessity of doing all this at once. Therefore, on the 4th of June, I sent the following message to the military commandant and the city council of New Orleans:-- New Orleans, June 4, 1862. to the military commandant and City council of New Orleans: General Shepley and Gentlemen:--Painful necessity compels some action in relation to the unemployed and starving poor of New Orleans. Men willing to labor cannot get work by which to support themselves and families, and are suffering for food. Because of the sins of their betrayers, a worse than the primal curse seems to have fallen upon them: In the sweat of thy face shalt thou eat bread until thou return unto the ground
1862, in front of Richmond: Corps.Killed.Wounded.Missing. Gen. Sumner, (Second,)183894146 Heintzelman, (Third,)259980155 Keyes, (Fourth,)4481753921   Total,89036271222 The grand total, killed, wounded, and missing, is five thousand seven hundred and thirty-nine. A nominal list will be furnished as soon as the data can be received. G. B. Mcclellan, Major-General Commanding. General Richardson's letter. Camp at the Fair Oaks station, Va., five miles from Richmond, June 4, 1862. dear sir: Wishing to give you some particulars of the hard-fought battle in which the whole of my division was engaged on the first of this month, I have to state beforehand that I cannot just now give a detailed account of the action at this time, as we are still in front of the enemy, and may be attacked at any time, which is not conducive to a perfect history. This point is on the railroad leading from our base of supplies to Richmond, and, of course, is a strategic point, and the
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