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Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 22 22 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 19 19 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 13 13 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 10 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 8 8 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 6 6 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 4 4 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 16, 1862., [Electronic resource] 4 4 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 4 4 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 4 4 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The Western flotilla at Fort Donelson, Island number10, Fort Pillow and — Memphis. (search)
President's Island, was the next boat disabled by our shot. She was run ashore, burned, and blown up. The Confederate ram Sumter was also disabled by our shell and captured. The Bragg soon after shared the same fate and was run ashore, where her officers abandoned her and disappeared in the forests of Arkansas. All the Confederate rams which had been run on the Arkansas shore were captured. The Van Dorn, having a start, alone escaped down the river. The rams The battle of Memphis (June 6, 1862), looking south. After a drawing by rear-admiral Walke. Monarch and Switzerland were dispatched in pursuit of her and a few transports, but returned without overtaking them, although they captured another steamer. See paper on Ellet and his steam-rams at Memphis, page 453.-editors. The scene at this battle was rendered most sublime by the desperate nature of the engagement and the momentous consequences that followed very speedily after the first attack. Thousands of people crowd
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Ellet and his steam-rams at Memphis. (search)
the Secretary of War.-editors. In the distance: Price, little Rebel, Queen of the West, and monarch. Union gun-boats. Van Dorn Jeff. Thompson. Bragg. Sumter. Beauregard (sinking). Lovell (sunk). the battle of Memphis, June 6, 1862 (looking north). retreat of the Confederate fleet. After a sketch by rear-admiral Walke. On the 8th of March, 1862, occurred the memorable catastrophe at Hampton Roads. The possibility of such a disaster had been repeatedly urged in warnposite the fort in a yawl and, after lying off in order to become assured that the place was abandoned, to land, with the assurance that the rams would follow in case my yawl did not return before daylight. Close of the battle of Memphis, June 6, 1862 (looking North). Sumter and Bragg (captured). Thompson (blowing up). Memphis.Benton. Cairo. Burning of unfinished Confederate ram. Louisville. St. Louis. Carondelet. After a drawing by Rear-Admiral Walke. I landed with my little band, onl
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The opposing forces at New Madrid (Island number10), Fort Pillow, and Memphis. (search)
, respectively. Union fleet at Fort Pillow, May 10TH, 1862. Capt. Charles Henry Davis, commanding pro tern. Benton (flagship), Lieut. S. L. Phelps; Carondelet, Comr. Henry Walke; Mound City, Comr. A. H. Kilty; Cincinnati, Comr. R. N. Stembel (w); St. Louis, Lieut. Henry Erben; Cairo, Lieut. N. C. Bryant; Pittsburgh, Lieut. Egbert Thompson. The Union loss as officially reported was: Cincinnati, wounded, 3 (1 mortally). Mound City, wounded, 1. Total, 4. Union fleet at Memphis, June 6TH, 1862. Flag-Officer Charles Henry Davis, commanding. Gun-boats--Benton (flagship), Lieut. S. L. Phelps; Louisville, Comr. B. M. Dove; Carondelet, Comr. Henry Walke; Cairo, Lieut. N. C. Bryant; St. Louis, Lieut. Wilson McGunnegle. Ram fleet-Queen of the West (flag-ship), Col. Charles Ellet, Jr.; Monarch, Lieut.-Col. Alfred W. Ellet; Switzerland, First Master David Millard. The Union loss as officially reported was: Gun-boatswounded, 3. Ram fleet-wounded, 1 (Col. Ellet, who subsequently die
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Stonewall Jackson in the Shenandoah. (search)
et your mounted men report to the cavalry. I want you in person to By Major Jed. Hotchkiss, top. Eng. Valley Dist. A. N. Va. Pennsylvania “bucktails.” Colonel Johnson, mounted. The first Maryland (Confederate) regiment at Harrisonburg, June 6, 1862, and the death of Ashby. In the affair of the rear-guard at Harrisonburg on the 6th of June, 1862, the 1st Maryland Regiment, Colonel (afterward General) Bradley T. Johnson, was ordered by General Ewell to charge through the woods to the le6th of June, 1862, the 1st Maryland Regiment, Colonel (afterward General) Bradley T. Johnson, was ordered by General Ewell to charge through the woods to the left in support of the 58th Virginia, then closely engaged with the Pennsylvania 13th (Bucktails). They charged with a cheer, but soon began to suffer from a fire in the flank and rear. Colonel Johnson gave the command, By the right flank, file right, march! As soon as the colors came into line--By the left flank, charge! The right companies charged at double-quick, the left companies coming up on a run — thus changing front to the right under fire. At the same instant a volley from the enemy s<
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 17: evacuation of Fort Pillow and battle of Memphis. (search)
ay in the following order: Flagship Benton, Lieut.-Com. Phelps; Louisville, Com. B. M. Dove; Carondelet. Corn. H. Walke; Cairo, Lieut.-Com. N. E. Bryant; St. Louis, Lieut.-Corn. Nelson McGunnegle. They dropped down the river according to signal, and prepared for battle. The Confederate gun-boats opened fire upon our fleet as it moved down. with the seeming intention of having the city injured by the return fire; but due care was taken in regard Action of the gun-boats at Memphis, June 6 1862. to this matter, and shot and shell were sent among the Confederates with good effect. At this moment the ram fleet was several miles up the river, though coming down rapidly, and it was necessary for our gunboats to maneuver so as to enable it to overtake them. The Confederate vessels (still under the command of Montgomery) were the rams General Van Dorn, General Price, General Lovell, General Beauregard and General Jeff Thompson, mounting each four heavy guns; the General Bragg a
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 20: a brave officer's mortification.--history set right. (search)
basis of the published programme of April 20th, never carried out; the formation and position of the attacking force being therefore entirely misunderstood by the historians. One (Rev. Mr. Boynton's) history not even mentioning me, although it did those of officers commanding vessels under me. My name was merely inserted (as commanding a division) at the instance of a friend, who discovered the omission too late to make a further correction. The resolution of the United States Senate of June 6, 1862, and accompanying documents, of which two thousand were printed, perpetuates the error of our passing the forts in two columns abreast. Mr. Greeley in his American conflict, and other authors, are led into the same misstatements. Lossing's Pictorial history erroneously describes the Cayuga as retiring from the fight on account of her damages, whereas she was continually in action notwithstanding she was much cut up with forty-two shot holes. The Varuna, which had passed us while heavil
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), April 29-June 10, 1862.-advance upon and siege of Corinth, and pursuit of the Confederate forces to Guntown, Miss. (search)
from their general and their country. The following are the casualties sustained by this division from Apri 24 to June 6, 1862: Regiment. Killed. Wounded. Missing. 7th Illinois 3 7   2d Iowa 4 43 17 2d Michigan 2 6   3d Michi Maj. Gen. J. C. Breckinridge. [inclosure H.] Memorandum of orders.headquarters Western Department, Baldwin, iss., June 6, 1862-5 p. m. I. General Van Dorn's army will start at 3 a. m. on the 7th instant on its way to Tupelo via the road from h Alabama Infantry, commanding Brigade, of operations May 28-29. headquarters First Brigade, Near Baldwin, Miss., June 6, 1862. Major: I have the honor to report that on the evening of the 28th ultimo, being in command of the First Brigade, lkner, Chanmbers Cavalry (Confederate), of burning of Cypress Creek Bridge, May 30. camp near Clear Creek, Tenn., June 6, 1862. On the night of the 29th ultimo I received an order in writing at Cypress Bridge about 12 o'clock directing me to
ed them back. Mitchel. On the 8th he says: I am ordered by General Halleck to push cars and locomotives across the river at Decatur. This cannot be done until the enemy's troops are driven out. 1 know their cavalry still remains opposite Lamb's Ferry and along the line of the railway. In my opinion a great struggle will take place for the mastery of the railway from Richhn nd iouth to Atlanta. D. C. Buell, Major-General. Major-General ha Lleck. Huntsville, Ala., June 6, 1862. An expedition, composed of troops from all those under my command, inl charge of General Negley, has driven the enemy under General Adams trom Winchester through Jasper back to Chattanooga, utterly routing lanmd leeating them there. Baggage wagons and ammunition, with supplies, have fallen into our hands. On to-morrow morning my troops will be opposite Chattanooga, supported, as I hope, by my new gunboat, the Tennessee. We have broken up a most important enterprise of the enemy, ma
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), June 6, 1862.-naval engagement off Memphis, Tenn., and occupation of that city by Union forces. (search)
June 6, 1862.-naval engagement off Memphis, Tenn., and occupation of that city by Union forces. steamer H. Von Phul, City of Memphis, June 6, 1862. The rebel fleet was found moored at thi United States steamer Benton, Off Memphis, June 6, 1862. I arrived here last night at 9 o'clock,anton, Secretary of War. opposite Memphis, June 6, 1862 (via Cairo, June 8). It is proper and dunote to the authorities: opposite Memphis, June 6, 1862. To the Civil or Military Authorities of Me the city: Mayor's office, Memphis, Tenn., June 6, 1862. Col. Charles Ellet, Jr., Commanding, etc.:ty: U. S. Flag-steamer Benton, Of Memphis, June 6, 1862. To His Honor the Mayor of the City of Mempommanding Indiana Brigade. Mayor's office, June 6, 1862. To Flag-Officer C. H. DAvis and Col. G. N.ters U. S. Forces, U. S. S. Henry Von Phul, June 6, 1862. The company commanders will immediatelyes, C. S. Army. headquarters, Grenada, June 6, 1862. Memphis surrendered to the enemy at 10 [1 more...]
June 6, 1862.-skirmish near Tompkinsville, Ky. Reports. No. 1.-Col. Edward C. Williams, Ninth Pennsylvania Cavalry. No. 2.-Maj. Thomas J. Jordan, Ninth Pennsylvania Cavalry. No. 1.-report of Col. Edward C. Williams, Ninth Pennsylvania Cavalry. headquarters, Bowling Green, Ky., June 13, 1862. Sir: In obedience to orders received from you per telegraph, 6th instant, to proceed to Clinton County, Kentucky, for the purpose of clearing that section of marauding bands, I left Bowlimitted. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, B. C. Williams, Colonel, Commanding Lochiel Cavalry. Brig. Gen. J. T. Boyle, Louisville, Ky. No. 2.-reports of Maj. Thomas J. Jordan, Ninth Pennsylvania Cavalry. Glasgow, Ky., June 6, 1862. Sir: I have just received information from Lieutenant Longsdorf, Company I, Ninth Pennsylvania Cavalry, that Captain McCullough was this morning attacked by Hamilton, Morgan, and Co. with about 200 men; that they drove the enemy before the
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