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home of my childhood. Every thing is being stolen on these two places and elsewhere. A lieutenant on General Porter's staff rode up this evening to ask M. to sell him butter, fowls, eggs, etc. She told him that her poultryyard had been robbed the night before by some of his men. He professed great horror, but had not gone fifty yards when we heard the report of a pistol, and this wonderfully proper lieutenant of a moment before had shot the hog of an old negro woman who lives here. June 14th, 1862. While quietly sitting on the porch yesterday evening, I saw a young man rapidly approaching the house, on foot; at first we took it for granted that he was a Yankee, but soon found from his dress that he was one of our soldiers, and from his excited manner that there was something unusual the matter. He was Lieutenant Latane, of Stuart's Brigade. They had been fighting on the road from Hanover Court-House to the Old Church, and his brother, the captain of the Essex Troop, had bee
June 14th, 1862. While quietly sitting on the porch yesterday evening, I saw a young man rapidly approaching the house, on foot; at first we took it for granted that he was a Yankee, but soon found from his dress that he was one of our soldiers, and from his excited manner that there was something unusual the matter. He was Lieutenant Latane, of Stuart's Brigade. They had been fighting on the road from Hanover Court-House to the Old Church, and his brother, the captain of the Essex Troop, had been killed about two miles from W. The mill-cart from W. soon after passed along, and he put his brother's body into it, and brought it to W. There he found a Yankee picket stationed. C. immediately took the dead soldier into her care, promising to bury him as tenderly as if he were her brother; and having no horse left on the place, (the enemy had taken them all,) sent him here, by a private way, to elude the vigilance of the picket, to get M's only remaining horsefor the poor fellow h
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 30: foreign Relations.—Unjust discrimination against us.—Diplomatic correspondence. (search)
May, 1861, Her Britannic Majesty assured our enemies that the sympathies of this country were rather with the North than with the South, and on June I, 1861, she interdicted the use of her ports to armed ships and privateers, though the United States claimed this right for themselves. On June 12, 1861, the United States reproved Great Britain for holding intercourse with the Commissioners of the Confederate States, so-called, and received assurances that it would not occur again. On June 14, 1862, Mr. Seward justified himself for obstructing Charleston Harbor and other commercial inlets, by saying that three thousand miles were more than could be successfully blockaded. He could stop up the large holes by his ships, but could not stop up all the small ones. Her Majesty's minister for foreign affairs, May 6, 1862, said, this blockade kept up irregularly has injured thousands. Yet Her Majesty's Government have never sought to take advantage of the obvious imperfections of this b
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Cumberland Gap. (search)
d ambition now was to advance against Knoxville and arouse the Union men of east Tennessee to arms. I urgently asked for two additional brigades of infantry, a battery, and two regiments of cavalry, and, thus reenforced, pledged myself to sweep east Tennessee of the Confederates. My guns were increased from 22 to 28, and a battery of east Tennessee artillery was raised, commanded by Lieutenant Daniel Webster, of Foster's 1st Wisconsin Plan of the Confederate works at Cumberland Gap, June 14, 1862. from a drawing by Captain W. F. Patterson. battery. Four thousand stand of arms, destined for east Tennessee but left at Nicholasville and Crab Orchard during the winter on account of the impassable state of the roads, were now sent forward to Cumberland Gap with a large supply of ammunition, and magazines and an arsenal were got ready for them. A vast store-house, capable of containing supplies for 20,000 men for 6 months, was also built by Captain W. F. Patterson. The nerves and
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 16: the Army of the Potomac before Richmond. (search)
m that preparations were made for sending to him the remainder of McDowell's corps, that officer being directed to co-operate fully with him. But the terms of that co-operation, which was simply that McDowell should retain an independent command, were so offensive to McClellan that he answered--If I cannot control all of his troops I want none of them, and would prefer to fight the battle with what I have, and let others be responsible for the result. Dispatch to the Secretary of War, June 14, 1862. In that angry dispatch he made an ungenerous insinuation of inordinate ambition on the part of a brother officer. McDowell had politely telegraphed to him his desire to have McCall's division of his own corps placed so as to join him immediately on his arrival. Because of this request, which was in accordance with orders from the War Department on the 8th, the angry General said--I do not feel that, in such circumstances as these under which I am now placed, General McDowell should w
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), April 7-12, 1862.--raid on Confederate line of communications between Chattanooga, Tenn., and Marietta, Ga. (search)
d sentenced. do Do. 9 Elihu Mason do Do. 10 William Knight do Do. 11 Robert Buffum do Do. 12 William Pittenger do Do. 13 Capt. David Fry Greene County, Tennessee Bridge-burning and recruiting for Federal Army. 14 G. W. Barlow Washington County, Tennessee Obstructing railroad track. Respectfully submitted. By order William M. Churchwell, colonel and provost-marshal. U. L. York, Adjutant. General orders, no. 54. Hdqrs. Dept. Of East Tennessee, Knoxville, June 14, 1862. I. At a general court-martial, held at Knoxville, by virtue of General Orders, Nos. 21 and 34 (department headquarters, April 15, and May 10, 1862), whereof Lieut. Col. J. B. Bibb,,of the Twenty-third Regiment Alabama Volunteers, was president, was tried : Other paragraphs of this order promulgate the proceedings and findings of the same court in the cases of Privates Martin Ross, Perry G. Shadrick, and George D. Wilson, Second Ohio Infantry; John Scott, Twenty-first Ohio Infantry
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), April 29-June 10, 1862.-advance upon and siege of Corinth, and pursuit of the Confederate forces to Guntown, Miss. (search)
28 to June 6. camp near Iuka, Miss., June 14, 1862. Sir: In obedience to orders requiring Sixth Regiment Indiana Vols., Iuka, Miss., June 14, 1862. Deab sir: In compliance with your ordeVolunteer Infantry, Camp near Iuka, Miss., June 14, 1862. General: In compliance with your order0. in camp one mile from Iuka, Miss., June 14, 1862. In obedience to your order of this dat May 2 to June 11. camp, Iuka, Miss., June 14, 1862. Sir: I have the honor to make the folln, Army of the Ohio Camp, Tuscumbia, Ala., June 14, 1862. Sir: After having bivouacked two weekss. 4TH Div., left wing, Army of the Miss., June 14, 1862. Major: The division under my command ar of instructions see report no. 38. of June 14, 1862, held after receiving his letter in reply f America. [exhibit A.] Richmond, Va., June 14, 1862. Col. Wm. Preston Johnston, Aide-de-Camp: ant, Jefferson Davis. Richmond, Va., June 14, 1862. Col. Wm. Preston Johnston, Aide-de-Camp, [3 more...]
to many imitations, some of them brilliant in design and execution; some of them damaging to the adverse party; others disastrous to their executors; but, on the whole, involving a squandering of horseflesh and an amount of useless devastation which rendered them decidedly unprofitable, and hardly reconcilable with the legitimate ends of warfare. Gen. McClellan, at midnight on the 14th, telegraphed to the War Department as follows: headquarters army of the Potomac, camp Lincoln, June 14, 1862. All quiet in every direction. The stampede of last night has passed away. Weather now very favorable. I hope two days more will make the ground practicable. I shall advance as soon as the bridges are completed and the ground fit for artillery to move. At the same time, I would be glad to have whatever troops can be sent to me. I can use several new regiments to advantage. It ought to be distinctly understood that Mcdowell and his troops are completely under my control. I rec
burg, as already stated, I regard its fate as sealed. You may defend it for awhile to hold the enemy at bay, but it must follow ere long the fate of Fort Pillow. How important Davis thought Vicksburg was, is shown by his letter of the 14th of June, 1862, to General Smith, commanding at Vicksburg:-- Richmond, Virginia, June 14, 1862. Brig.-Gen. M. L. Smith, Vicksburg, Miss.: . . . . . . . . . . . . . What progress is being made toward the completion of the Arkansas? What is the cJune 14, 1862. Brig.-Gen. M. L. Smith, Vicksburg, Miss.: . . . . . . . . . . . . . What progress is being made toward the completion of the Arkansas? What is the condition of your defence at Vicksburg? Can we do anything to aid you? Disasters above and below increase the value of your position. I hope and expect much from you. Jefferson Davis. On the 22d of June General Bragg ordered to Vicksburg the first reinforcements, six thousand of Breckinridge's corps. On the 26th Van Dorn, who was left in command of Beauregard's army, removed his headquarters to Vicksburg, only to be immediately superseded by Bragg, who was in command of the department
pper. Some of them were in their tents, and some were sitting about under the trees. Suddenly I heard such a mighty hurrah out of doors that I thought heaven and earth had come together. Running to the door, I saw the Yankees running in every direction, and our men pursuing and catching them. One Yankee jumped into the Pamunkey and tried to swim across, but our men fired at him and he sunk directly. This was the only firing done. Philadelphia press account. White House, Va., June 14, 1862. One of the boldest and most astounding feats of the rebels in this war occurred on Friday evening last, a short distance from this place. It was another of those desperate efforts they have from time to time put forth to recover lost opportunity and atone for past defeats. The surprisal of Banks by Jackson, though of a more formidable and successful character, was not more complete, sudden, and unexpected than the one experienced in this department. A part, some say a whole regi
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