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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 65 65 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 20 20 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 7 7 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 6 6 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 6 6 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 6 6 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 6 6 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 6 6 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 5 5 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 5 5 Browse Search
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btless have the will to do them harm enough, but, surrounded and watched as we are, the power is wanting. Our guard is composed of regulars, who are much more decent men than the volunteers. C. commenced harvest yesterday, in a small way, but so many servants are gone to the Yankees, that much of the wheat must be lost, and the corn cannot be worked. The milkmaid amused herself at their remarks to them: Ladies, why do you work for white people? You are all free now, etc., etc. June 18th, 1862. Our guard in full force to-day. It is so absurd to see the great fellows on their horses, armed from head to foot, with their faces turned towards us, standing at our yard-gate, guarding women and children, occasionally riding about on the gravel-walks, plucking roses, with which they decorate their horses' heads. A poor woman came to-day in a buggy, in pursuit of corn. She had been robbed by the enemy of every grain. This is the case with many others, particularly with soldiers
June 18th, 1862. Our guard in full force to-day. It is so absurd to see the great fellows on their horses, armed from head to foot, with their faces turned towards us, standing at our yard-gate, guarding women and children, occasionally riding about on the gravel-walks, plucking roses, with which they decorate their horses' heads. A poor woman came to-day in a buggy, in pursuit of corn. She had been robbed by the enemy of every grain. This is the case with many others, particularly with soldiers' wives. I asked an officer to-day, what had become of General Stuart? He said he was a smart fellow, and he guessed he had returned to Richmond, but he ought to have paid a visit to his father-in-law, General Cooke, commanding the United States cavalry not many miles distant.
March 28-June 18, 1862.-Cumberland Gap (Tenn.) campaign. Events. Mar. 28, 1862.-Brig. Gen. George W. Morgan, U. S. Army, assigned to command of Seventh Division, Army of the Ohio, and ordered to operate against Cumberland Gsp. April 29, 1862.-skirmish near Cumberland Gap. June 10, 1862.-skirmish at Wilson's Gap.-skirmish at Rogers' Gap. June 11-12, 1862.-skirmishes in Big Creek Gap June 15, 1862.-action at Big Creek Gap. June 18, 1862.-skirmish at Wilson's Gap.--Cumberland GJune 18, 1862.-skirmish at Wilson's Gap.--Cumberland Gap occupied by Union forces. Reports, etc. No. 1.-Maj. Gen. Don Carlos Buell, U. S. Army, with dispatches relating to Brigadier-General Morgan's report. No. 2.-Brig. Gen. George W. Morgan, U. S. Army, commanding Seventh Division, Army of the Ohio. No. 3.-Capt. Jacob T. Foster, First Wisconsin Battery, Chief of Artillery of operations June 6-18. No. 4.-Brig. Gen. Samuel P. Carter, U. S. Army, commanding Twenty-fourth Brigade, Army of the Ohio, of operations June 8-16. No. 5.-Brig. Ge
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), April 29-June 10, 1862.-advance upon and siege of Corinth, and pursuit of the Confederate forces to Guntown, Miss. (search)
enden, Commanding Fifth Division, Army of the Ohio. No. 18.-report of Brig. Gren. Horatio P. Van Cleve, U. S. Army, commanding Fourteenth Brigade, of operations from April 29 to June 16. Hdqrs. 14TH Brig., 5TH Div., Army of the Ohio, June 18, 1862. Sir: I have the honor to make the following report of the operations of my command from the time of leaving Pittsburg to the evacuation of Corinth and the termination of the pursuit of the enemy: The division being encamped on the fiessippi. Brig. Gen. W. L. Elliott, Chief of Staff, Army of the Miss. No. 27.-report of Lieut. Col. Edward Hatch, Second Iowa Cavalry, of operations from April 29 to June 9. headquarters Second Iowa Cavalry, Camp, near Corinth, Miss., June 18, 1862. Sir: I have the honor to report, complying with order to report, actions, scouts, and skirmishes the Second Iowa Cavalry has been engaged mi subsequent to its arrival at Hamburg, Tenn. The first within my knowledge is the attack upon Mont
June 7, 1862.-skirmish at Readyville, Tenn. Report of Col. J. W. Starnes, Third Tennessee Cavalry. Loudon, Tenn., June 18, 1862. Captain: I have the honor to report that about the 1st of this month I crossed the Cumberland Mountains with 300 men of my regiment, a section of Captain Kain's battery of artillery, and 80 men under command of Major Estes. In accordance with arrangements made with Colonels Adams and Davis, I moved from Hulbert's Cove to form a junction with them at or near Rutledge's, some 4 miles from Cowen's Depot. On arriving at the point designated I found the enemy passing up the mountain with a force of about 4,500 men, under command of General Negley. Believing I could form a junction with Colonels Adams and Davis at Jasper before the enemy could reach that point, I recrossed the mountain at night by way of Tracy City. On reaching Tracy City I learned the enemy were already in possession of Jasper, and my command would be entirely cut off from Chatt
is order, as a violation of law for the purpose of returning fugitives to Rebels, was arrested and deprived of his command. Lt.-Col. D. R. Anthony, 7th Kansas, was likewise arrested and deprived of his command in Tennessee, for issuing June 18, 1862. an order, which said: The impudence and impertinence of the open and earned Rebels, traitors, Secessionists, and Southern-rights men of this section of the State of Tennessee, in arrogantly demanding the right to search our camp for fugi. Any officer or soldier of this command, who shall arrest and deliver to his master a fugitive slave, shall be summarily and severely punished, according to the laws relative to such crimes. Maj.-Gen. David Hunter, having succeeded June 18, 1862. to command at Hilton Head, issued the following: headquarters Department of the South, Hilton head, S. C., May 9, 1862. General Order, No. 11. The three States of Georgia, Florida, and South Carolina, comprising the Military Departm
lled by explosion of ammunition, August 8, 1864, at City Point, Va. Sixteenth Wisconsin, Company A:--George Halsey; drafted----; died February 27, 1865, Lynch Creek, S. C., of fatigue. One Hundred and Seventy-ninth New York, Company E:--Charles Clements; killed November 14, 1864, by falling from cars while on furlough. Thirty-ninth Illinois, Company D:--John Hays; killed in a row, July 4, 1865. Second Ohio, Company B:--George D. Wilson; executed by the Rebels at Atlanta, Ga., June 18, 1862; charged with being a bridge-burner. (One of the famous party who captured a locomotive at Big Shanty, Ga.) Fifth New York Cavalry, Company H:--Edgar C. Shephard; drowned April 22, 1863, while en route home on furlough. One Hundred and Fifty-ninth New York, Company D:--A. W. Rackett; killed April 17, 1863, by a shot from a house while filling his canteen at a well near Vermillion Bayou, La. Fifth Ohio, Company H:--Thos. Kelly; murdered by a comrade. Eighth Tennessee (Union),
ase includes 30 deaths in Confederate prisons. battles. K. & M. W. battles. K. & M. W. Williamsburg Road, Va., June 18, 1862 29 Gettysburg, Pa. 23 Oak Grove, Va., June 25, 1862 4 Locust Grove, Va. 2 Glendale, Va. 7 Wilderness, Va. 10 er its arrival there, the regiment was ordered to develop the enemy's position in the woods on the Williamsburg Road--June 18, 1862--in which affair the Sixteenth established a reputation for efficiency under fire; its loss in that fight was 17 killho had been educated at West Point, and had distinguished himself in the Mexican War. He commanded the regiment until June 18, 1862, when he died suddenly at Fort Pulaski. The Forty-eighth left Fort Hamilton, N. Y., on September 15, 1861, and afterVa. 1 Mine Run, Va. 1 Yorktown, Va. 2 Wilderness, Va. 5 Fair Oaks, Va. 2 Spotsylvania, Va. 10 Skirmish, Va., June 18, 1862 1 Cold Harbor, Va. 10 Picket, Va., June 19, 1862 2 Siege of Petersburg, Va. 13 Savage Station, Va. 4 Weldon Rai
38 4th U. S. Colored Hinks's Eighteenth 15 110 10 135 2d Penn. H. A. Martindale's Eighteenth 16 94 16 126 148th New York Martindale's Eighteenth 16 74 26 116 89th New York Martindale's Eighteenth 10 82 2 94 25th Massachusetts Martindale's Eighteenth 11 44 -- 55 5th U. S. Colored Hinks's Eighteenth 8 48 20 76 11th Connecticut Martindale's Eighteenth 6 52 5 63 Petersburg, Va. The Ninth Corps assaulted on the 17th; the Second Corps on the 18th.             June 17-18, 1862. Includes losses in the trenches, June 19-30th.             24th N. Y. Cav'y (dism'ted) Willcox's Ninth 38 156 3 197 2d Michigan Willcox's Ninth 21 170 13 204 187th Pennsylvania Griffin's Ninth 23 165 1 189 37th Wisconsin Willcox's Ninth 33 122 2 157 170th New York Gibbon's Second 22 111 3 136 27th Michigan Willcox's Ninth 17 106 5 128 36th Wisconsin Gibbon's Second 16 107 -- 123 109th New York Willcox's Ninth 26 81 20 127 4th Delaware Cutler's Fifth 21 91
up. Rebellion record. General Wright's report. headquarters First division, N. D. D. S., James Island, S. C., June 18, 1862. Major: I have the honor to present the following report of my division in the action of the sixteenth inst.: Bt, Robert Williams, Col. First Mass. Cavalry, Commanding Post. Major Metcalf's report. James Island, S. C., June 18, 1862. Lieutenant: I have the honor to report, that in accordance with instructions received in the evening of the fifte Stevens's order. headquarters Second division, Northern District, Department of the South, James Island, S. C., June 18, 1862. General order No. 26. The Brigadier-General commanding the Second division, in communicating to his command the al Stevens. hazard Stevens, Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General. Charleston Mercury account. Charleston, June 18, 1862. Secessionville is a small village, the summer retreat of a few of the James Island planters. It is on the easter
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