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Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 8: commands the army defending Richmond, and seven days battles. (search)
ed easterly, crossing the Central Railroad below Hanover Court House about ten o'clock, and, taking the Mechanicsville road, camped for the night south of the Totopatomoy Creek at a place called Hundley's Corner, some seven or eight miles northeast of Mechanicsville. He was thus getting well in the rear of the right of the Federal army. Lee's preparations for assault had been completed. His battle order was as follows: General orders no. 75.headquarters, army of Northern Virginia, June 24, 1862. 1. General Jackson's command will proceed to-morrow from Ashland toward the Slash Church and encamp at some convenient point west of the Central Railroad. Branch's brigade, of A. P. Hill's division, will also to-morrow evening take position on the Chickahominy near Half-Sink. At three o'clock Thursday morning, 26th inst., General Jackson will advance on the road leading to Pole Green Church, communicating his march to General Branch, who will immediately cross the Chickahominy and
the gate. Mrs. W. (Mrs. B's daughter) supposing he was only wounded, ran out with restoratives to his assistance. While standing there, two Yankees came up. Mrs. W. ordered them to surrender, which one did without the slightest hesitation, giving up his arms, which she immediately carried in to her younger brother, who was badly armed. The other escaped, but her prisoner went along with the crowd. Yankee wagons are again taking off corn from W. The men are very impertinent to C. June 24th, 1862. Yankee scouts are very busy around us. to-day. They watch this river, and are evidently fearing a flank movement upon them. Wagons passing to Dr. N's for corn, guarded by Lancers, who are decidedly the worst specimens we have seen. Compared with them, the regulars are welcome guests. It is so strange that Colonel Rush, the son of a distinguished man, whose mother belonged to one of the first families in Maryland, the first-cousin of James M. Mason, and Captain Mason of our navy,
June 24th, 1862. Yankee scouts are very busy around us. to-day. They watch this river, and are evidently fearing a flank movement upon them. Wagons passing to Dr. N's for corn, guarded by Lancers, who are decidedly the worst specimens we have seen. Compared with them, the regulars are welcome guests. It is so strange that Colonel Rush, the son of a distinguished man, whose mother belonged to one of the first families in Maryland, the first-cousin of James M. Mason, and Captain Mason of our navy, of Mrs. General Cooper and Mrs. S. S. Lee, should consent to come among his nearest of kin, at the head of ruffians like the Lancers, to despoil and destroy our country! I suppose that living in Philadelphia has hardened his heart against us, for the city of Brotherly Love is certainly more fierce towards us than any other. Boston cannot compare with it. This is mortifying, because many of us had friends in Philadelphia, whom we loved and admired. We hope and believe that the Quak
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., East Tennessee and the campaign of Perryville. (search)
n the hands of the enemy, and that even the vigilance and resoluteness of escorts and guards were materially affected by the idea that captivity meant liberty and relaxation. To this rule there were of course honorable exceptions. The following orders concerning absentees and paroles were published in view of these evils, which were seriously impairing the strength and efficiency of the army: General orders, no. 26headquarters, army of the Ohio, in camp, near Florence, Ala., June 24th, 1862. There are 14,000 officers and soldiers absent from their duty with the various divisions of this army, i. e.. the five divisions south of the Tennessee River. Some of them have gone off without any authority; others with the permission of officers not authorized to grant it. In general, sickness is given as the cause of absence, but in very many cases that cause has notoriously ceased to exist, and men remain away, drawing the same pay as their comrades who are faithfully performin
f violence. The volcano will ever threaten. The brightest skies will be no security against a whirlwind. The craziest slaveholding traitor can have no objection to such a truce, which by leaving him without punishment, leaves him without warning against a repetition of his crime. The hour he will reason, may be lost but not the day. The quarrel may be for a little while adjusted, he will say to his fellows, but we have always at hand the means of its renewal at pleasure. He will fervently thank his stars for an enemy who, when victorious over him, left all his resources unimpaired, and pretending to make a peace, was content with an armistice. Southern Independence associations will flourish under the sacred noses of the Federal Courts, and men who have forfeited fifty lives will stalk and strut, bully and brag, as of old, in Washington. It is not a pleasant picture to contemplate, but we had better know the chances now, than blunder into a Century of Anarchy. June 24, 1862.
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), April 29-June 10, 1862.-advance upon and siege of Corinth, and pursuit of the Confederate forces to Guntown, Miss. (search)
Col. Wm. Preston Johnston.] Memorandum of a conversation with General Beauregard, in accordance with my letter of instructions see report no. 38. of June 14, 1862, held after receiving his letter in reply to the interrogatories therein, June 24, 1862, at Mobile. see p. 774.Mobile, Ala., June 24, 1862. General Beauregard informs me that his army numbered less than 45,000 effective men, after deducting those who were reported present for duty, but were sent back on railroad as unfit fJune 24, 1862. General Beauregard informs me that his army numbered less than 45,000 effective men, after deducting those who were reported present for duty, but were sent back on railroad as unfit for service, some 3,000 or 4,000 in number. He places the enemy's numbers at 90,000 effective men, and certainly not less than 85,000. The prisoners and deserters reported Halleck's army at 125,000 or 130,000 men, but General Beauregard bases his estimate on the facts, as he learns them, that they have three corps and a reserve corps, four in all and estimates to each corps four divisions, to each division three brigades, to each brigade four regiments, to each regiment 500 men; making about t
r. (4) Col. John H. Gleason; Bvt. Major-Gen. (5) Col. James D. Brady. Losses. Officers. En. Men. Total. Killed or mortally wounded 15 141 156 Died of disease, accidents, etc. 1 62 63 Died in Confederate prisons   30 30   Totals 16 233 249     Total enrollment, 1,411; killed, 156;==11.0 per cent. Battles. Killed. Wounded. Includes the mortally wounded. Missing. Includes the captured. Total. Fair Oaks, Va. 1 2 1 4 On Picket, Va., June 24, 1862   2   2 On Picket, Va., June 26, 1862 1 7   8 Seven Days Battle, Va. 2 17 51 70 Antietam, Md. 35 165 2 202 Fredericksburg, Va. 2 38 4 44 Chancellorsville, Va. 1 3 2 6 Gettysburg, Pa. (2 cos.) 5 10 8 23 Bristoe Station, Va.   2 7 9 Wilderness, Va. 9 78 8 95 Spotsylvania, Va. 6 22 3 31 North Anna, Va.   4   4 Totopotomoy, Va. 2 4 2 8 Cold Harbor, Va. 1 23 5 29 Siege of Petersburg, Va. 11 48 19 78 Deep Bottom, Va., August 14-18, 1864   10 1
ments made to me subsequently by Gens. Casey and Naglee, I am induced to believe that portions of the division behaved well, and made a most gallant stand against superior numbers; but at present the accounts are too conflicting to enable me to discriminate with certainty. When the facts are clearly ascertained, the exceptional good conduct will be properly acknowledged. G. B. Mcclellan, Major-General Commanding. Rebel reports and narratives. Gen. Johnston S report. Richmond, June 24, 1862. Gen. S. Cooper, Adjutant and Inspector-General: sir: Before the thirtieth of May I had ascertained from trusty scouts that Keyes's corps was encamped on this side of the Chickahominy, near the Williamsburgh road. On that day Major-Gen. D. H. Hill reported a strong body immediately in his front. On receiving this report, I determined to attack them next morning, hoping to be able to defeat Keyes's corps completely in its more advanced position before it could be reenforced. Written
in which he was untiringly aided by Captain S. R. Johnson, of the Provisional Engineers; Majors Talcott and Venable, in examining the ground and the approaches of the enemy; Majors Taylor and Marshall, in communicating orders and intelligence. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, R. E. Lee, General. Appendix to General Lee's Report of the operations of the army of Northern Virginia. General orders no. 75.headquarters army of Northern Virginia, June 24, 1862. I. General Jackson's command will proceed to-morrow from Ashland toward the Slash Church, and encamp at some convenient point west of the Central Railroad. Branch's brigade, of A. P. Hill's division, will also, to-morrow evening, take position on the Chickahominy, near Half Sink. At three o'clock Thursday morning, twenty-sixth instant, General Jackson will advance on the road leading to Pale Green Church, communicating his march to General Branch, who will immediately cross the Chi
at the Wilderness and in the Bloody angle at Spotsylvania the following year. It fought at Cold Harbor, and went to Petersburg, but returned to Washington with the veteran Sixth Army Corps to defend the city from Early's attack. It then accompanied Sheridan on his Shenandoah Valley Campaign and fought at the battle of Opequon. It was mustered out, October 19, 1864, at the expiration of its term. The Eighth Battery of Massachusetts Light Artillery was organized for six months service June 24, 1862. It fought at the second battle of Bull Run, at South Mountain, and Antietam. The regiment was mustered out November 29, 1862. Major Asa M. Cook Dinner time first Massachusetts light battery in camp Lieutenant Josiah Jorker, with the first Massachusetts artillerymen Fourteen batteries of seventy-five guns and forty mortars were established across the Peninsula, the work of constructing emplacements beginning on April 17th and ending on May 3d. During the night of May 3d,
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