hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 33 33 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 11 11 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 9 9 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 6 6 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 5 5 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 4 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 4 Browse Search
Judith White McGuire, Diary of a southern refugee during the war, by a lady of Virginia 3 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 2 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 2 2 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 114 results in 68 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
all day. Our loved ones, whether friends or strangers-all Southern soldiers are dear to us-lying dead and dying; the wounded in the hot sun, the dead being hastily buried. McClellan is said to be retreating. Praise the Lord, O my soul! June 28th, 1862. The casualties among our friends, so far, not very numerous. My dear R. T. C. is here, slightly wounded; he hopes to return to his command in a few days. Colonel Allen, of the Second Virginia, killed. Major Jones, of the same regimentard it is terrific. I doubt not that a general engagement is going on. O God! be with us now; nerve the hearts and strengthen the arms of our men! Give wisdom and skill to our commanders, and grant us victory for thy great name's sake! June 28th, 1862. We have just heard of our success, and that Jackson and Ewell have come from the Valley, and have flanked the enemy on the Chickahominy. Two of our troopers called in this morning. July 1st, 1862. Firing continues, but lower and l
June 28th, 1862. We have just heard of our success, and that Jackson and Ewell have come from the Valley, and have flanked the enemy on the Chickahominy. Two of our troopers called in this morning.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 5.26 (search)
emy after several hours' severe fighting; that he had been disappointed in not receiving assistance upon his left; and, although it was now nearly too late, that an attack, by theNine-mile road, upon the right flank and rear of the enemy would probably enable him to drive them into the Chickahominy before night. All of the foregoing quotations from my report were omitted from the copy that was put on file, in compliance with General Johnston's request, contained in his letter to me, June 28th, 1862, in which he said: I inclose herewith the three first sheets of your report, to ask a modification — or omission, rather. They contain two subjects which I never intended to make generally known, and which I have mentioned to no one but yourself, and mentioned to you as I have been in the habit of doing everything of interest in the military way. I refer to the mention of the misunderstanding between Longstreet and myself in regard to the direction of his division, and that of his
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The battle of Malvern Hill. (search)
Charles City cross-roads); the action of Turkey Creek, and the battle of Malvern Hill. Each was a success to our army, the engagement of Malvern Hill being the most decisive. The result of the movement was that on the 2d of July our army was safely established at Harrison's Landing, on the James, in accordance with General McClellan's design. The present narrative will be confined to events coming under my own observation, and connected with my command, the Fifth Army Corps. Saturday, June 28th, 1862, the day after the battle of Gaines's Mill, my corps spent in bivouac at the Trent farm on the south bank of the Chiekahominy. Artillery and infantry detachments guarded the crossings at the sites of the destroyed bridges. Our antagonists of the 27th were still north of the river, but did not molest us. We rested and recuperated as best we could, amid the noise of battle close by, at Garnett's and Golding's farms, in which part of Franklin's corps was engaged, refilling the empty
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 16: the Army of the Potomac before Richmond. (search)
ccordingly, directing Keyes to advance with his corps through the White Oak Swamp, across the creek that traverses it, and take position on the other side, so as to cover the passage of troops and trains. Before day-break the next morning June 28, 1862. General McClellan went to Savage's Station, and remained there all day, superintending the movement, which was commenced at an early hour. By noon Keyes was in the prescribed position. During the day Porter's shattered division was moved a time considered in the: text, and the out-buildings and about three hundred tents around them were filled with wounded men. 29th, and moved across the White Oak Swamp toward the front of his retreating columns. He had issued the day before June 28, 1862. two extraordinary documents. One was an order for the sick and wounded men who could not march, to be left at Savage's Station with surgeons, rations, and medical stores, to fall into the hands of the Confederates. The Commander ordered
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 21: capture of New Orleans.--first attack on Vicksburg by Farragut's fleet and mortar flotilla.--junction of flag-officers Farragut and Davis above Vicksburg.--ram Arkansas. (search)
Flag-Ship Hartford, above Vicksburg, June 28, 1862. Sir — I passed up the river this morniofficer Farragut's report of the action of June 28, 1862, at Vicksburg. United States Flag-Ship Hartford, above Vicksburg, Mississippi, June 28, 1862. Sir — I have the honor to report the ftates Steam-Sloop Oneida, Above Vicksburg, June 28, 1862. Sir — I have the honor to report the per Richmond, Above Vicksburg, Mississippi, June, 28, 1862. Sir — In accordance with your instruct Flag-Ship Hartford, above Vicksburg, June 28, 1862. Sir — I have the honor to report the fd States Gun-Boat Sciota, above Vicksburg, June 28, 1862. Sir — I have to report that, in passind States Gun-Boat Winona, above Vicksburg, June 28, 1862. Sir — I am happy to be able to report J. P. Jackson, of the attack on Vicksburg, June 28, 1862. United States Flag-Ship Hartford, ader P. Crosby, of the attack on Vicksburg, June 28, 1862; also the report of Lieutenant-Commander S[1
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), April 29-June 10, 1862.-advance upon and siege of Corinth, and pursuit of the Confederate forces to Guntown, Miss. (search)
2; Third Kentucky, 1; Twenty-sixth Ohio, 2; Sixty-fifth Ohio, 2; Thirteenth Michigan, 3; Third Ohio Battery, 1. I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, th. J. Wood, Brigadier-General of Volunteers, Commanding. Col. J. B. Fry, Assistant Adjutant-General, Chief of Staff. No. 20.-report of Brig. Gen. William S. Rosecrans, U. S. Army, commanding right wing Army of the ]Mississippi, of operations from May 28 to June 12. Hdqrs. Right wing Army of the Mississippi, June 28, 1862. General: I have deferred my report of the operations of this wing for the brief period of my command until the reports of the division commanders were received. I have now the honor to forward these reports, accompanied by the following report: When I assumed the command of Paine's and Stanley's divisions they were bivouacked and intrenched in two lines, facing south and west, Paine's center being on the Farmington and Danville road, Stanley on his right, extending the right, re
army of the Potomac, June 27-12 M. My change of position on the other side just in time. Heavy attack now being made by Jackson and two divisions. Expect attack also on this side. headquarters army of the Potomac, Svage's Station, June 28, 1862-12:20 A. M. I now know the whole history of the day. On this side of the river — the right bank — we repulsed several strong attacks. On the left bank, our men did all that men could do, all that soldiers could accomplish; but they were ou, or to any other persons in Washington. You have done your best to sacrifice this army. G. B. McClellan, Maj.-Gen. To Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War. To these reproachful missives, the President thus responded: Washington, June 28, 1862. Save your army at all events. Will send reenforcements as fast as we can. Of course, they can not reach you to-day, to-morrow, or next day. I have not said you were ungenerous for saying you needed reenforcements; I thought you were unge
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington, Chapter 15: Confederate losses — strength of the Confederate Armies--casualties in Confederate regiments — list of Confederate Generals killed — losses in the Confederate Navy. (search)
ox's Longstreet's 27 130 -- 157 6th Georgia Colquitt's D. H. Hill's 22 131 3 156 1st South Carolina Gregg's A. P. Hill's 20 125 -- 145 18th Georgia Hood's Whiting's 14 128 3 145 9th Alabama Wilcox's Longstreet's 34 96 4 134 4th Alabama Law's Whiting's 22 108 2 132 10th Alabama Wilcox's Longstreet's 24 105 -- 129 18th Virginia Pickett's Longstreet's 14 99 5 118 13th Virginia Elzey's Ewell's 27 84 -- 111 Garnett's Farm, Va.--Golding's Farm, Va.           June 27, 28, 1862.             2d Georgia Toombs's Jones's 14 106 -- 120 8th Georgia Anderson's Jones's 24 57 11 92 7th Georgia Anderson's Jones's 12 66 -- 78 Savage Station, Va.             June 29, 1862.             3d South Carolina Kershaw's McLaws's 23 108 4 135 7th South Carolina Kershaw's McLaws's 13 64 5 82 10th Georgia Semmes's McLaws's 10 47 -- 57 Glendale, Va.             June 30, 1862.             Palmetto Sharpshooters Anderson's Longs
plies,--as our fleets were both above and below the town — it might have been starved out in twenty days, as Grant a year afterwards captured it by starvation of its forces, after he had lost many men in assaults, and from the unhealthiness of the region. Ellet with his fleet had captured Fort Pillow; and the river would have been opened from St. Louis down to the sea, if Halleck had complied with Farragut's request. This was Farragut's letter:-- aboard flag-boat, above Vicksburg, June 28, 1862. Major-General Halleck: Sir:--I have the honor to inform you that I have passed the batteries and am now above Vicksburg with the greatest part of my fleet. I drove the men from the batteries, but they remained quiet till we passed, and then they up again and raked us. They have some eight regiments, or ten thousand troops, to replenish the batteries and prevent us from landing. Brigadier-General Williams is acting in concert with me, but his force is too small to attempt to land on
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...