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Twenty dollars reward. --For my woman Virginia, commonly calls herself Jennie. She left my house on the morning of the 6th instant, was seen in Richmond soon after, and has been seen several times since on Cary street, between 17th and 18th. She is of medium size, quite dark, thick, bushy hair her words, has black mark on one check, is about 30 years old. Any information that may lead to her recover will be liberally rewarded, or the above reward will be paid for her delivery. H. G. Archer. Manchester, June 28, 1862. je 28--4t.
Twenty Dollars reward --For my woman Virginia, commonly calls herself Joulnic She left my house on the morning of the 6th instant, was seen in Richmond soon after, and had been seen several times since on Cary street, between 17th and 18th. She is of medium size, quite dark, thick, bushy hair, drawls her words, has a black mark on one check, is about 30 years old. Any information that may lead to her recovery will be liberally rewarded, or the above reward will be paid for her delivery. H. G. Archer. Manchester, June 28, 1862 je 28--4t*
Despotism in Norfolk. --The following order has been issued by Brig. Gen. E. L. Vicle, the Military Governor of Norfolk. This Vicle was a Captain of the New York Seventh regiment when it visited Richmond, and participated in the hospitalities extended them by the citizens of Norfolk, while on their way here: Office of military Governor, Norfolk, Va, June 28, 1862. Assemblages in the streets for purposes of political discussions being provocative of civil disturbance, are positively forbidden, and the exhibition of badges and flags indicative of disloyal sentiments will not be tolerated. Parents will be hold responsible for the conduct of their children in this particular. By command of Brig's General E. L. Vicle, Military Governor, C. T. Christensen, Provost Marshal, and Act'g Ass't Adj't Gen'l.
The Daily Dispatch: July 5, 1862., [Electronic resource], List of casualties in the recent battles before Richmond. (search)
hitlock. Company H.--Killed: Gorp'l J P Maiden, privates G W Burton, j M Mize. Wounded: Corp'l J O Smith; privates Dn Ball, B C Diion, M F Walker, J G powell, A N Steel, J York, L Lamberts. Company K.--Killed: Privates paul Barger, Geo Cauble, James Solemon. Wounded: Privates Alfred C Carter. Wm Morris, J F Thompson. The regiment went into the battle with 130 effective men. Killed 8, wounded 16--Total 51. Casualties in Company a; 5th battalion Alabama Volunteers, on the 28th and 29th June, 1862. Killed: Lt D W. Hustid, Orderly Sergt J H Boyle Sergt. J. W. Wrenn; Sergt. E. L Houston, Corpl B. Branch, Corpl T Camber, privates F. Eard, W Steelerd of Hodges, J Bennyeasth, R. H Moon, J. J. Whittaker, J Tompkins. W Murphy. Wounded; Capt A S Vance Graalf, slightly in foot; Phivates J. T. Bradshaw, arm, L. L Glarry; J. B. Bradshaw, leg; W. G frost; N. Little, head, slight; B. B. Little, side, slight; Newton Hill head, slight; J. W. Holloway, Bead, slight; B. d. nan
the Penitentiary, by Andy Johnson, of several clergymen of Nashville, who refused to take the oath of allegiance to the Abolition Government. The following are the orders of the Tennessee Haynan, in their cases: Executive Department, June 28, 1862. Lieut. Col. McLain. Acting Provost Marshal: Sir — I have to request that you will issue stringent orders prohibiting all visitors to the members of the clergy this day sent as prisoners to the penitentiary, except such as have special p our Government, and as such are entitled to, and should receive, such consideration as attaches to a person guilty of such a crime. Very respectfully, Andrew Johnson, Military Governor. State of Tenn., Ex'vr Department Nashville, June 28, 1862. Lieut. Col. McLain, Acting Provost Marshal: Sir--Rev. Drs. Howell, Ford, Sehen, Sawrie and Baldwin are under arrest, and they are hereby placed in your ensued. Should they desire to give evidence of their loyalty, by taking the oa
ws: Captain Biddle's note. "General McCall--Seneca Simmons, Colonel 5th Pennsylvania infantry, commanding brigade, died in hospital in woods by my side; is buried here. I laid out in field, mud holes house, and woods till dusk on 2d, and reached here at midnight. (Signed) "H. J. Biddle. "General McCall." Letter from a Union prisoner. The following letter is from a Union officer in prison at Salisbury, N. C.: Depot for Union Prisoners, Salisbury, N. C., June 28th, 1862. There are nearly two hundred officers and privates, and one hundred and fifty citizens, confined here. Privates Gould and Schwarts, of Philadelphians--, of Buffalo, and six citizen prisoners, have died within the last fortnight. There are fifty patients in the hospital. Scurvy is the prevalent complaint. There has been very little sickness among the officers confined here, and that only joying good health. We have this morning received permission from Major Gordon,
Entrenching Tool. Gen. McClellan seems always to have kept an eye to the spading business. The following circular was found on the battle-field. Headqrs army of the Potomac,June 28th, 1862. Circular Care will be taken by commanders to send forward with their wagons all the entrenching tools in the possession of their command. By command of Major-Gen. McClellan. S. Williams, A. A. General.
you are not strong enough to take Richmond just now, I do not wish you to." The young Napoleon modestly tells Able that his "change of base" was "unparalleled in the annals of war.-- There are a good many more amusing as well as instructive, things which the reader will meet with in perusing the correspondence. A fierce letter to the Secretary of War. On the night of the 28th, I sent the following to the Secretary of War: Headquarters Army of the Potomac, Savage Station, June 28. 1862. 12.00, A. M. I now know the full history of the day. On this side of the river, the right bank, we repulsed several strong attacks. On the left bank our men did all that men could do, all that soldiers could do, but they were overwhelmed by vastly superior numbers, even after I brought my last reserves into action. The loss on both sides later this. I believe it will prove to be the most desperate battle of the war. The sad remnants of my men behave as men; those battalions wh
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