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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., East Tennessee and the campaign of Perryville. (search)
invading army by a successful war upon its too long and inadequately protected communications, with an enemy in its front. The line in this case was a single railroad, 350 miles long, through a population either hostile to the invader, or at least in a considerable degree friendly to his opponent. Under the circumstances that were to ensue, it is not perhaps to be accounted a misfortune that the contemplated advance was checked at the start. A Union army of 31,000 men at Chattanooga in July, 1862, without supplies, with its communications broken for 400 miles, and the Government on the Potomac appealing for 25,000 men which could not be spared from Corinth, might well have been in a worse condition than the stronger army in November, 1863, which was reduced to horse and mule meat for its ration, with its communications complete to within 30 miles, and with an unoccupied army from Vicksburg and consider able reenforcements from the Potomac hastening to its succor. The reports of
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 2.21 (search)
o declared the fight a draw. They ended the matter with a coffee and tobacco trade and an agreement to do no more firing at picket-lines, unless an advance should be ordered. It was this agreement that enabled Lieutenant Rogers to save a long picket-line that was to have been sacrificed when we fell back. Racine, Wis., October 3d, 1886. Ii. By Orson B. Curtis, Corporal, Co. D, 24th Michigan. Since Private Smith, above, mentions the 24th Michigan as bounty men, let me state that in July, 1862, a war meeting held in Detroit to promote enlistments under Lincoln's call for 300,000 men was broken up by the disturbance created by a large number of Confederate refugees from Windsor, Canada, with the aid of some antiwar men here. To wipe out the unexpected insult, a second war meeting was held, which resolved to raise immediately an entire regiment,--the 24th Michigan,--in Wayne County alone, in addition to its regular quota; and within 20 days said regiment was recruited and mustere
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 5.67 (search)
troops in Mississippi, in two bodies, one commanded by Major-General Van Dorn, the other by Major-General Price. Those two officers were independent of each other — and, strange to say, of General Bragg also.--J. E. J. In the first half of July, 1862, General Halleck was ordered to Washington as general-in-chief. Before leaving Corinth he transferred General Buell, with his troops, to middle Tennessee, and left General Grant in command of those holding in subjection north-eastern Mississipon which gave the enemy control of the Mississippi and divided the Confederacy, and would have given the Confederacy the ascendency on that frontier. It is evident, and was so then, that the three bodies of Confederate troops in Mississippi in July, 1862, should have been united under General Bragg. The army of above 65,000 men so formed could not have been seriously resisted by the Federal forces, not only greatly inferior to it in numbers, but so distributed that the various parts could have
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Union vessels in the Vicksburg operations. (search)
Lieut.-Com. J. A. Greer (Vicksburg, Grand Gulf), 16 guns; Essex, Com. W. D. Porter, Com. C. H. B. Caldwell (Port Hudson), Com. R. Townsend, 5 guns, 1 howitzer; July, 1862, 7 guns, 1 howitzer; June 10th, 1863, 8 guns, 2 howitzers; August 1st, 1863, 8 guns, 4 howitzers. Eads iron-Clads.--St. Louis (Baron De Kalb), Lieut. W. McGu2), Lieut. J. M. Murphy (Steele's Bayou, Vicksburg, and Grand Gulf), 13 guns, 1 howitzer; May 15th, 1863, 11 guns; Cincinnati, Lieut.-Com. B. Wilson (Vicksburg, July, 1862), Lieut. George M. Bache (Arkansas Post, Steele's Bayou, Vicksburg, May 27th), 13 guns, 1 howitzer; Louisville, Com. B. M; Dove (Vicksburg, July, 1862), Lieut.-July, 1862), Lieut.-Com. E. K. Owen (Arkansas Post, Steele's Bayou, Vicksburg, and Grand Gulf), 13 guns, 1 howitzer; Mound City, Com. A. H. Kilty (St. Charles), Lieut.-Com. W. Gwin (Yazoo River Raid, Aug., ‘62), Lieut. B. Wilson (Steele's Bayou, Vicksburg, and Grand Gulf, Warrenton), 13 guns, 1 howitzer; May 28, ‘63, 11 guns; July 26, ‘63,13 guns; Pi<