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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 18 18 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 6 6 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 6 6 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 5 5 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 4 4 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 4 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 2 2 Browse Search
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So may it be, until the whole army melts with fervent heat. The gun-boats are rushing up and down the river, shelling the trees on the banks, afraid to approach Drury's Bluff. The Northern papers and Congress are making every effort to find out to whom the fault of their late reverses is to be traced. Our people think that their whole army might have been captured but for the dilatoriness of some of our generals. General Magruder is relieved, and sent to take command in the West. July 21st, 1862. Mr.--sick, but better to-day. This is the anniversary of the glorious battle of Manassas. Since that time we have had many reverses, but our victories, of late, have atoned for all, except the loss of life. We have had another naval fight on the Mississippi, just north of Vicksburg. Our large gun-boat, Arkansas, ran into the Federal fleet of twelve or thirteen gun-boats and rams, and overcame them completely. Vicksburg stands the bombardment with unflinching gallantry. No n
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., East Tennessee and the campaign of Perryville. (search)
uiry, instituted by General Rosecrans, at the request of General T. T. Crittenden, the commander of the brigade, after his exchange, acquitted the commander of blame, on the ground that he had only arrived the day before the attack, and had shown commendable energy in his new position. Colonel Duffield had also just arrived. He appeared to have behaved well in the attack, and was severely wounded: General orders, no. 32headquarters, army of the Ohio, in camp, Huntsville, Ala., July 21st, 1862. On the 13th instant the force at Murfreesborough, under command of Brigadier-General T. T. Crittenden, late colonel of the 6th Indiana Regiment, and consisting of 6 companies of the 9th Michigan, 9 companies of the 3d Minnesota, 2 sections of Hewett's (Kentucky) battery, 4 companies of the 4th Kentucky Cavalry, and three companies of the 7th Pennsylvania Cavalry, was captured at that place by a force of the enemy's cavalry variously estimated at from 1800 to 3500. It appears from t
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 7.83 (search)
r as a military commander. During that memorable march I rode at his side from day to day, and it was his habit to confide to me his hopes and fears. About the end of June, 1862, General Bragg was visited by many prominent citizens of Kentucky, who had abandoned their homes, and who assured him that Kentuckians were thoroughly loyal to the South, and that as soon as they were given an opportunity it would be proven. Fired with this idea, he planned his offensive campaign. On the 21st of July, 1862, the movement of the Army of Mississippi from Tupelo was ordered. The infantry moved by rail, the artillery and cavalry across the country. Headquarters were established at Chattanooga on the 29th. On the 30th Major-General Kirby Smith visited General Bragg at that point, and it was arranged that Smith should move at once against the Federal forces under General George W. Morgan in Cumberland Gap. In this interview General Bragg was very certain that he would begin his forward move
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington, Chapter 15: Confederate losses — strength of the Confederate Armies--casualties in Confederate regiments — list of Confederate Generals killed — losses in the Confederate Navy. (search)
point of loss, at various battles. The list is incomplete, as there are few Confederate official reports for the latter part of the war. Still the record is one which will ever redound to the credit of American manhood, and to the glory of the American soldier. List of battles showing Confederate regiments which sustained the greatest loss in each. Regiment. Brigade. Division. Killed. Includes the mortally wounded.Wounded. Missing. Total. First Bull Run, Va.             July 21, 1862.             8th Georgia Bartow's Johnston's 41 159 -- 200 4th Alabama Bee's Johnston's 40 157 -- 197 7th Georgia Bartow's Johnston's 19 134 -- 153 33d Virginia Jackson's Johnston's 45 101 -- 146 27th Virginia Jackson's Johnston's 19 122 -- 141 4th Virginia Jackson's Johnston's 31 100 -- 131 Hampton Legion ---------- Beauregard's 19 100 2 121 Wilson's Creek, Mo.             August 10, 1861.             3d Arkansas ---------- Pearce's 25 84 1
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, chapter 13 (search)
Chapter 11: Memphis to Arkansas post. July, 1862, to January, 1863. When we first entered Memphis, July 21, 1862, I found the place dead; no business doing, the stores closed, churches, schools, and every thing shut up. The people were all more or less in sympathy with our enemies, and there was a strong prospect that the whole civil population would become a dead weight on our hands. Inasmuch as the Mississippi River was then in our possession northward, and steamboats were freely plying with passengers and freight, I caused all the stores to be opened, churches, schools, theatres, and places of amusement, to be re-established, and very soon Memphis resumed its appearance of an active, busy, prosperous place. I also restored the mayor (whose name was Parks) and the city government to the performance of their public functions, and required them to maintain a good civil police. Up to that date neither Congress nor the President had made any clear, well-defined rules touchin
ame day, I was made prisoner by Brig.-Gen. Forrest, but in my then helpless condition was released upon my parole not to bear arms against the confederate States until I am regularly exchanged. I remain, Colonel, your obedient servant, William W. Duffield, Colonel Ninth Michigan Independent Volunteers, Commanding Twenty-third Brigade. Col. James B. Fry, A. A.G., Chief of Staff, Huntsville, Ala. General Buell's order. headquarters army of the Ohio, in camp, Huntsville, Ala., July 21, 1862. On the thirteenth instant the force at Murfreesboro, under command of Brigadier-General T. T. Crittenden, late Colonel of the Sixth Indiana regiment, and consisting of six companies of the Ninth Michigan, nine companies of the Third Minnesota, two sections of Hewitt's Kentucky battery, four companies of the Fourth Kentucky cavalry, and three companies of the Seventh Pennsylvania cavalry, was captured at that place by a force of the enemy's cavalry, variously estimated at from eightee
Doc. 154.-expedition to Beaver Dam, Va. Official report of General Pope. headquarters of the army of Virginia, Washington, July 21, 1862. To Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War: the cavalry expedition I directed Gen. King to send out, on the nineteenth, has returned. They left Fredericksburgh at seven P. M. on the nineteenth, and after a forced march during the night, made a descent at daylight in the morning upon the Virginia Central Railroad at Beaver Dam Creek, twenty-five miles west of Hanover Junction, and thirty-five miles from Richmond. They destroyed the railroad and telegraph-line for several miles, burned the depot, which contained forty thousand rounds of musket ammunition, one hundred barrels of flour, and much other valuable property, and brought in a captain in charge as a prisoner. The whole country was thrown into a great state of alarm. One private was wounded on our side. The cavalry marched eighty miles in thirty hours. The affair was most succe
Doc. 16.-Official Correspondence. Army of the Potomac. General Lee to General McClellan. headquarters, Department of Northern Virginia, July 21, 1862. To Major-General George B. McClellan, Commanding Army of the Potomac: General: It has come to my knowledge that many of our citizens, engaged in peaceful avocations, have been arrested and imprisoned because they refused to take the oath of allegiance to the United States, while others, by hard and harsh treatment, have been compelled to take an oath not to bear arms against that Government. I have learned that about one hundred of the latter class have been released from Fortress Monroe. This government refuses to admit the right of the authorities of the United States to arrest our citizens and extort from them their parole not to render military service to their country, under the penalty of incurring punishment in case they fall into the hands of your forces. I am directed by the Secretary of War to inform you th
Brown, A. A. General. General Huger's Report. Headquarters of division, falling Creek, Chesterfield County, July 21, 1862. General B. E. Lee, commanding Army Northern Virginia: General: I submit, herewith, the reports of different commavery respectfully, Your most obedient servant, Benjamin Huger, Major-General commanding Division. falling Creek, July 21, 1862. General R. E. Lee commanding: General: In forwarding my reports of the different engagements of the division whicral, commanding Right Wing. Report of battle of June 30. headquarters Fourth brigade, Longstreet's division, July 21, 1862. Major G. M. Sorrell, Assistant Adjutant-General: sir: I have the honor to submit the following report of the oper. Carpenter, Lieutenant, commanding Carpenter's Battery. Report of Captain Grimes. Camp near falling Creek, July 21, 1862. Major-General Benjamin Huger: sir: Below please find a report of the movements of my battery, from the twentieth
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Engagements of the Civil War with losses on both sides December, 1860-August, 1862 (search)
Union 17 killed, 34 wounded. Confed. 8 killed, 29 wounded. July 18, 1862: Memphis, Mo. Union, 2d Mo., 11th Mo. Cav. Opponents, Porter's independent forces. Losses: Union 83 killed and wounded. Porter's loss, 23 killed. July 21, 1862: Hartsville road, near Gallatin, Tenn. Union, detachments 2d Ind., 4th, 5th Ky., 7th Pa. Cav. Confed., Morgan's Cav. Losses: Union 30 killed, 50 wounded, 75 captured. Confed. No record found. July 21, 1862: Nashville Bridge,July 21, 1862: Nashville Bridge, Tenn. Union, 2d Ky. Confed., Forrest's Cav. Losses: Union 3 killed, 97 captured. Confed. No record found. July 25, 1862: Courtland Bridge and Trinity, Ala. Union, 10th Ky., 10th Ind., 31st Ohio. Confed., Armstrong's Cav. Losses: Union 2 killed, 16 wounded, 138 captured. Confed. 3 killed, 5 wounded. July 28, 1862: Moore's Mills, Mo. Union, 9th Mo., 3d Ia. Cav., 2d Mo. Cav., 3d Ind. Battery. Opponents, Porter's independent forces. Losses: Union 13
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