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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 120 120 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 30 30 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 17 17 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 16 16 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 10 10 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 10 10 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 7 7 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 6 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 5 5 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 4 4 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Strength of General Lee's army in the Seven days battles around Richmond. (search)
we wonder why a resolution of Congress should be necessary to blot them from the list of Union victories recorded on the standards of its armies. We think that we know something about the second battle at Manassas, and yet is not General Fitz John Porter, who fought us so stubbornly at the first battle of Cold Harbor, now in disgrace; because it was proved to the satisfaction of a Federal court-martial that half the Confederate army was not where we all know it was on the morning of August 29th, 1862? And on our side, have we not read General Joseph E. Johnston's Contribution of materials for the use of the future historian of the war between the States, and has any one risen from the perusal of that interesting book, without the conviction that its distinguished author is mistaken as to some of his statements, or that all contemporaneous history is in error? I will venture to present only two of the perplexities in which the future historian of the war between the States will
es are very attentive; and they are said to be very well kept. I have been to a very large one to-day, in which our old home friends, Mrs. R. and Miss E. M., are matrons. Every thing looked beautifully neat and comfortable. As a stranger, and having so much to do for my patient at home, I find I can do nothing for the soldiers, but knit for them all the time, and give them a kind word in passing. I never see one without feeling disposed to extend my hand, and say, God bless you. August 29th, 1862. The Richmond papers of yesterday mention two severe skirmishes on the Rappahannock within a week The enemy are retreating through Culpeper, Orange, etc., and our men are driving them on. General Jackson has reached Warrenton. Burnside's army is said to be near Fredericksburg, and Pope retreating towards Manassas. The safe situation of this town makes it a city of refuge to many. Several of our old friends are here. Mr. and Mrs. D., of Alexandria, are just across the passage fro
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 8.58 (search)
tered the position held by the enemy's left on the evening of the 29th, also confirmed this statement. They reported to me the evacuation of these positions by the enemy, and that there was every indication of their retreat in the direction of Gainesville. On the morning of the 30th, as may be easily believed, our troops, who had been marching and fighting almost continuously for many days, were greatly exhausted. They had had Monument to the Union soldiers who fell at Groveton August 28, 29, and 30, 1862. from a photograph taken soon after the monument was erected in 1865. This view is taken from the edge of the railway cut, looking toward the Union lines. The shaft is of brown sandstone, and in design and material is like the monument erected on the Henry hill at the same time. The shot and shell that were fixed with mortar to the base and to the top of the shaft, and every vestige of the inclosing fence, have been carried off by relic-hunters. In May, 1884, the monument
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Jackson's raid around Pope. (search)
ressed a wish that we should hurry, our troops were allowed to take their natural swing under the inspiration of impending battle. As we approached the field the fire seemed to become more spirited, and gave additional impulse to our movements. According to the diary of the Washington Artillery we filed down the turnpike at Gainesville at 11:30 A. M. Gainesville, Ga., 8th January, 1886. My attention has just been called to a dispatch of the Federal General John Buford, written on August 29th, 1862, at 9:30 A. M., in which he gives information of my troops moving through Gainesville [Va.] some three-quarters of an hour before his note was written. This would place the head of my column at Gainesville about 9 A. M., and the line deployed and ready for battle at 12 M., which agrees with my recollection, and with my evidence in the F. J. Porter case. It seems that the Washington Artillery was halted some distance in rear to await my selection of the position to which it was assign
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The case of Fitz John Porter. (search)
n or communication with Reynolds, who held the left of the main line. Between them was a very wide gap, hidden by a wood through which Generals McDowell and Porter were unable to pass on horseback, and in which messengers sent by Porter to communicate with McDowell and others were captured by the enemy. The second order did not reach General Porter till 6:30 P. M., and before the dispositions immediately ordered to execute it could be completed, darkness interposed. It read: August 29th, 1862--4:30 P. M. Major-General Porter: Your line of march brings you in on the enemy's right flank. I desire you to push forward into action at one, on the enemy's flank and, if possible, on his rear, keeping your right in communication with General Reynolds. The enemy is massed in the woods in front of us, but can be shelled out as soon as you engage their flank. Keep heavy reserves and use your batteries, keeping well closed to your right all the time. In case you are obliged to fa
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 17: Pope's campaign in Virginia. (search)
treet. He directed McDowell and King to maintain their positions at all hazards; told Kearney to push forward from Centreville at one o'clock in the morning, Aug. 29, 1862. and follow Jackson closely along the Warrenton pike, to prevent his retreat northward toward Leesburg, and ordered Porter, whom he supposed to be at Manassas e sent out flanking parties (a strong one to Hopewell Gap), Ricketts yielded to necessity and fled toward Gainesville, rapidly followed early the next morning Aug. 29, 1862. by his antagonist. Pope's advantage was lost on the morning of the 29th. His army was scattered and somewhat confused, while the chances for a junction ofhe same material as that near the site of the Henry House, see page 607, volume I.) was this inscription: in memory of the patriots who fell at Groveton, August 28, 29, and 30, 1862. we are looking toward Manassas Junction, the place of which is indicated by the two birds. The single bird to the right indicates Groveton. Return
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 21: capture of New Orleans.--first attack on Vicksburg by Farragut's fleet and mortar flotilla.--junction of flag-officers Farragut and Davis above Vicksburg.--ram Arkansas. (search)
avy. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. P. S.--In the various encounters I have had since leaving St. Louis on the last cruise (July 6), the Essex has been struck by heavy shot perceptibly one hundred and twenty-eight times — glancing shot have left no record; three have broken the iron, and but one through, and that at a distance of a few feet from the battery delivering it. W. D. P. United States Gun-Boat Anglo-American, Off Bayou Sara, Louisiana, Aug. 29, 1862. Sir — In pursuance of your order, I proceeded down stream on the 24th instant, for New Orleans, arriving there on the morning of the 25th. We loaded up with coal, and left that city at 3.15 P. M., on Thursday, the 28th instant. Nothing of importance occurred until I reached Port Hudson. I noticed earthworks had been thrown up on the bluffs as well as the water line, but no guns being in sight, I kept on for about a mile, when another line of earthworks was discovered, as well as i
of Knox, Waldo, Kennebec, and Sagadahoc. The field officers had already served with honorable distinction in other Maine regiments. It arrived at Washington August 29, 1862, having been recruited, organized, and equipped within four weeks, a characteristic common to most of the regiments raised under the second call for troops. 1 Opequon, Va., Sept. 19, 1864 3 Thoroughfare Gap, Va., Aug. 28, ‘62 2 Culpepper, Va., Oct. 11, 1863 1 Luray Valley, Va., Sept. 22, 1864 3 Manassas, Va., Aug. 29, 1862 12 Buckland's Mills, Va., Oct. 19, 1863 3 Bridgewater, Va., Oct. 4, 1864 1 Leesburg, Va., Sept. 18, 1862 1 Raccoon Ford, Va., Dec. 5, 1863 1 New Market, Va.Plains; Hatcher's Run; Sailor's Creek; Farmville; Appomattox. notes.--Recruited and organized at Troy, N. Y. It was mustered into the United States service August 29, 1862, and left the State immediately, en route for Harper's Ferry, where it was captured on September 15th, at the surrender of that post. The captured garrison w
ive. headquarters army of Virginia, near Bull Run, Aug. 29, 1862--8 A. M. Major-Gen. Porter: General: McDowell has in A. D.C. headquarters army of Virginia, near Bull Run, Aug. 29, 1862--5 A. M. Major-Gen. Reno: General: I sent you some vrder no. 5. headquarters army of Virginia, Centreville, Aug. 29, 1862. Gens. Mcdowell and Porter: You will please move ford A. D.C. headquarters army of Virginia, in the field, Aug. 29, 1862--5 P. M. Major-General Banks: General: I would prefeW. B. Franklin, Major-General Commanding Sixth Corps. August 29, 1862--8 P. M. A true copy: T. C. H. Smith, Lieut.-Col. and Groveton. Battle at Groveton, near Bull Run, on Friday, August 29, 1862. On Thursday night, August 28, when the First c the Nineteenth Indiana volunteers in the battle of the twenty-ninth and thirtieth of August, 1862, at Bull Run: At one oe account of its operations, from July 25th, 1861, to August 29th, 1862. Washington, September 1, 1862. Brig.-General Wi
, Inclusive. headquarters army of Virginia, near Bull Run, Aug. 29, 1862--8 A. M. Major-Gen. Porter: General: McDowell has intercepteCol. and A. D.C. headquarters army of Virginia, near Bull Run, Aug. 29, 1862--5 A. M. Major-Gen. Reno: General: I sent you some verbal oreneral order no. 5. headquarters army of Virginia, Centreville, Aug. 29, 1862. Gens. Mcdowell and Porter: You will please move forward wit-Col. and A. D.C. headquarters army of Virginia, in the field, Aug. 29, 1862--5 P. M. Major-General Banks: General: I would prefer that ytfully, W. B. Franklin, Major-General Commanding Sixth Corps. August 29, 1862--8 P. M. A true copy: T. C. H. Smith, Lieut.-Col. and A. D.C. ing and Groveton. Battle at Groveton, near Bull Run, on Friday, August 29, 1862. On Thursday night, August 28, when the First corps was taken by the Nineteenth Indiana volunteers in the battle of the twenty-ninth and thirtieth of August, 1862, at Bull Run: At one o'clock A.
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