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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Minnesota Volunteers. (search)
of Mobile April 12. March to Montgomery April 13-25 and duty there till May 10. Moved to Selma, Ala., and duty there till July 20. Moved to St. Paul, Minn., July 20-August 8. Mustered out August 16, 1865. Regiment lost during service 2 Officers and 31 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 138 Enlisted men by disease. Total 171. 8th Minnesota Regiment Infantry. 3, then join Sibley and assist in guarding Indian pris-City, St. Paul and Fort Snelling June 2 to September 1, 1862. On frontier duty at various points in Minnesota August, 1862, to May, 1864. At Anoka, Princeton, Monticello, Kingston, Manannah, Paynesville, Fort Ripley, Sauk Centre, Pomme de Terre, Alexandria and Fort Abercrombie guarding Sioux frontier. Concentrated at Paynesville May 24, 1864. Mounted and march to Fort Ridgly May 24-28. Sibley's Expedition against hostile Indians west of the Missouri River June 5-October 15, 1864. Battle of Tah kah a kuty or Killdeer Mountain July
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Missouri Volunteers. (search)
2, and duty there fitting out till August. Skirmish on Little Blue June 2. Ordered to Southwest Missouri August, 1862, and reported to General Egbert B. Brown. Attached to District of Southwest Missouri, Dept. of Missouri, to December, 1862. District of Central Missouri, Dept. of Missouri, to July, 1863. District of the Border, Dept. of Missouri, to January, 1864. District of Central Missouri, Dept. of Missouri, to July, 1865. Service. Pursuit of Coffee August 8-September 1, 1862. Between Stockton and Humansville and near Stockton August 12. Duty at Mount Vernon till September 30. Joined Totten's Division, Army of the Frontier. Oxford Bend, near Fayetteville, Ark., October 27-28. Expedition from Greenfield into Jasper and Barton Counties November 24-26. Operations against Marmaduke in Missouri December 31, 1862-January 25, 1863. Defence of Springfield, Mo., January 8, 1863. Duty in Central Missouri and guarding Missouri Pacific Railroad, wi
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, New York Volunteers. (search)
Surrender of Johnston and his army. Duty at Raleigh and in the Dept. of North Carolina till August. Mustered out August 30, 1865. Regiment lost during service 7 Officers and 70 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 160 Enlisted men by disease. Total 237. 47th New York Regiment National Guard Infantry. Mustered in for three months United States service May 27, 1862. Left State for Baltimore, Md., May 30, and duty at Fort McHenry till September. Mustered out September 1, 1862. Again mustered in for 30 days United States service June 17, 1863. Left State for Washington, D. C., June 18, 1863. Duty in the defenses of that city. Attached to 3rd Brigade, defenses south of the Potomac, 22nd Army Corps, till July. Mustered out July 23, 1863. 48th New York Regiment Infantry--Continental Guard, Perry's Saints. Organized at Brooklyn, N. Y., September 10, 1861. Left State for Annapolis, Md., September 17, 1861. Attached to Viele's 1st Brigad
tered out July 7, 1865. Regiment lost during service 2 Officers and 46 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 5 Officers and 286 Enlisted men by disease. Total 339. 97th Ohio Regiment Infantry. Organized at Zanesville, Ohio, September 1, 1862. Moved to Covington, Ky., September 7, thence to Louisville, Ky:, September 20. Attached to 21st Brigade, 6th Division, Army of the Ohio, September, 1862. 21st Brigade, 6th Division, 2nd Corps, Army of the Ohio, to November, 1862. and 137 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 3 Officers and 106 Enlisted men by disease. Total 148. 104th Ohio Regiment Infantry. Organized at Camp Massillon, Ohio, and mustered in August 30, 1862. Moved to Covington, Ky., September 1, 1862. Attached to 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, Army of Kentucky, Dept. of the Ohio, to November, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, Army of Kentucky, to January, 1863. 1st Brigade, District of Central Kentucky, Dept. of Ohio, to June, 1863.
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Pennsylvania Volunteers. (search)
Enlisted men by disease. Total 232. 68th Pennsylvania Regiment Infantry. Organized at Philadelphia August, 1862. Left State for Washington, D. C., September 1, 1862. Camp at Arlington Heights till October. Moved to Poolesville, Md., and attached to 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 3rd Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to men killed and mortally wounded and 1 Officer and 70 Enlisted men by disease. Total 167. 139th Pennsylvania Regiment Infantry. Organized at Pittsburg September 1, 1862. Moved to Washington, D. C., September 1-3. Attached to 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 4th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to September, 1862. 2nd Brigen killed and mortally wounded and 3 Officers and 76 Enlisted men by disease. Total 246. 142nd Pennsylvania Regiment Infantry. Organized at Harrisburg September 1, 1862. Left State for Washington, D. C., September 2, and duty there till September 19. Moved to Frederick, Md., September 19. Attached to 2nd Brigade, 3r
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Rhode Island Volunteers. (search)
ngton, D. C., May 27-29. Attached to Samuel D. Sturgis' Command, Military District of Washington. Duty at Camp Frieze, Tennallytown, till June 26. Assigned to garrison duty in the Defenses of Washington. Company A at Fort Franklin, B and K at Fort Pennsylvania, C at Fort Cameron, D at Fort DeRussy. E and I at Fort Alexander, F at Fort Ripley, G at Fort Gaines, H at Battery Vermont and Battery Martin Scott and L near Fort Pennsylvania. Left for home August 25. Mustered out September 1, 1862. Regiment lost 3 by disease. 11th Rhode Island Regiment Infantry. Organized at Providence and mustered in October 1, 1862. Left State for Washington, D. C., October 6. Attached to Military District of Washington to December, 1862. District of Alexandria, Defenses of Washington, and 22nd Army Corps, to April, 1863. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 7th Army Corps, Dept. of Virginia, to June, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 4th Army Corps, Dept. of Virginia, to July, 18
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Vermont Volunteers. (search)
ers and 200 Enlisted men by disease. Total 438. 1st Vermont Regiment Heavy Artillery Organized at Brattleboro and mustered in as 11th Vermont Infantry September 1, 1862. Left State for Washington, D. C., September 7, 1862. Designation of Regiment changed to 1st Heavy Artillery December 10, 1862. (Co. L organized Juld mortally wounded and 3 Officers and 278 Enlisted men by disease. Total 305. 10th Vermont Regiment Infantry. Organized at Brattleboro and mustered in September 1, 1862. Moved to Washington, D. C., September 6-8. Attached to Grover's Brigade, Military District of Washington, to February, 1863. Jewett's Brigade, Prov and 140 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 203 Enlisted men by disease. Total 352. 11th Vermont Regiment Infantry. Organized at Brattleboro September 1, 1862. Left State for Washington, D. C., September 7. Attached to 1st Brigade, Haskins' Division, Military District of Washington, to December, 1862. Duty
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Appendix: letters from our army workers. (search)
bad way all the time; it is too late, too late. How dreadful to be without Christ! what a blessed thing it is to have Him for our friend, living and dying. With kind regards for you, and best wishes for God's blessing on your enterprise, I remain yours very truly, James McDowell. From Rev. W. L. Curry, Baptist, chaplain Fiftieth Georgia Regiment. near Milford, Georgia, March 20, 1867. Dear Brother Jones: . . . I was appointed chaplain of Fiftieth Georgia about September 1, 1862, just as we were entering upon the first Maryland campaign. For several months the army was in such constant motion that little could be done besides occasional preaching. Soon after the Fredericksburg battle, December 13, we went into winterquar-ters. I then commenced pastoral work-visiting among the tents, holding prayermeetings, etc. I commenced a sunrise prayer-meeting, which was attended, of course, only by the more earnest of the brethren, who were quite few in number, and k
is ended than nearly all succumbed to fever, or the exhaustion of excessive and protracted fatigue. Nevertheless, within a few days after Miss Wormeley's return home, the Surgeon-General, passing through Newport, came to call upon her and personally solicit her to take charge of the Woman's Department of the Lowell General Hospital, then being organized at Portsmouth Grove, R. I. After a brief hesitation, on account of her health, Miss Wormeley assented to the proposal, and on the 1st of September, 1862, went to the hospital. She was called, officially, the Lady Superintendent, and her duties were general; they consisted less of actual nursing, than the organization and superintendence of her department. Under her charge were the Female Nurses, the Diet Kitchens, and Special diet, the Linen Department, and the Laundry, where she had a steam Washing Machine, which was capable of washing and mangling four thousand pieces a day. The hospital had beds for two thousand five hundred
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 48: Seward.—emancipation.—peace with France.—letters of marque and reprisal.—foreign mediation.—action on certain military appointments.—personal relations with foreigners at Washington.—letters to Bright, Cobden, and the Duchess of Argyll.—English opinion on the Civil War.—Earl Russell and Gladstone.—foreign relations.—1862-1863. (search)
of freedmen on the Sea Islands, bearing witness to the general's cordial and effective co-operation in that work, as well as to his ability and devotion as an officer. As soon as the letter came to hand, Sumner called up the case, read the letter in the Senate, and moved the confirmation, which was carried. The senator's casting aside of personal or partisan prejudice in these two instances was justified by the event. Both officers fell on the field,— Stevens at Chantilly in Virginia, Sept. 1, 1862, and Stevenson at Spottsylvania, May 10, 1864. Antislavery people were in 1863 anxious to have General Fremont called from retirement and put in command of a large body of colored troops. Sumner introduced to the President a body of gentlemen who visited Washington for the purpose, and he did what he could to further the plan. The President in a letter to Sumner showed his desire to advance the wishes of the deputation. Fortunately for the country these well-meant efforts came to n
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