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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 39 39 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 25 25 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 25 25 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 19 19 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 11 11 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 10 10 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 6 6 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 6 6 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 4 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 4 4 Browse Search
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d the name of it Ebenezer, saying, Hitherto hath the Lord helped us. Oh! I trust that this day has been observed throughout the Confederacy. If all our duties were as easily performed, we should be very good Christians; but, alas! our hearts are often heavy, and do not cheerfully respond to the calls of duty. In prosperity, praise and thanksgiving seem to rise spontaneously to our lips, but to humble ourselves, and feel our entire dependence, is a much more difficult duty. Saturday, September 20th, 1862. An official account in the morning's paper of the surrender of Harper's Ferry to our men on Sunday last. Colonel Miles, the Federal commander, surrendered, unconditionally, to General Jackson, 11,000 prisoners, 50 pieces of artillery, 12,000 stand of arms, ammunition, quartermaster and commissary stores in large quantities. McClellan attempted to come to the rescue of Harper's Ferry. A courier was captured, sent by him to Miles, imploring him to hold out until he could br
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 5.26 (search)
ed his own division to the Williamsburg road, instead of moving to the attack by theNine-mile road, and he caused that division to take precedence of Huger's division at the crossing of Gilliss Creek, which at daylight was a raging torrent. General Huger, in a report, says: Longstreet's division got the road at the crossing first ; and adds that his own troops had to wait until they [Longstreet's division] had passed. The delay after that was the time necessary to cross. On the 20th of September, 1862, General Huger wrote to General Johnston: I beg to refer you to my letter of the 20th ultimo. I have waited one month, and no reply has been received from General Longstreet. As you have indorsed his erroneous statements, to my injury, I must hold you responsible, and desire to know from you if you have any reason to believe an answer will be made by General Longstreet. You must perceive that by postponing an answer your published report is allowed to go down to history as tru
the evacuation presented little difficulty, and was effected before daylight. On the 19th, General McClellan sent to the commander-in-chief a telegraphic report as follows--: I have the honor to report that Maryland is entirely freed from the presence of the enemy, who has been driven across the Potomac. No fears need now be entertained for the safety of Pennsylvania. I shall at once occupy Harper's Ferry. On the following day this despatch was received:-- Washington, September 20, 1862, 2 P. M. We are still left entirely in the dark in regard to your own movements and those of the enemy. This should not be so. You should keep me advised of both, so far as you know them. H. W. Halleck, General-in-Chief. Major-General G. B. Mcclellan. In reply to this curt and ungracious message, General McClellan, after giving the information sought, as far as it was in his power to do, said,-- I regret that you find it necessary to couch every despatch I have the honor to
lbyville, Tenn., June 27, 1863 9 Rome, Ga., Oct. 13, 1864 2 Verbilla, Tenn., Aug. 9, 1862 1 Chickamauga, Ga., Sept. 18, 1863 6 Lead's X Roads, Nov. 1, 1864 2 Gallatin, Tenn., Aug. 21, 1862 2 Mission Ridge, Tenn., Sept. 21, 1863 2 Bardstown Ky., Dec. 29, 1864 2 Fayetteville, Tenn., Sept., 9. 1862. 1 Cumberland Mountains, Oct. 4, ‘63 1 Selma, Ala., April 2, 1865 7 Brentwood, Tenn., Sept. 19, 1862 1 Dallas, Ga., May 27, 1864 5 Columbus, Ga., April 16, 1865 2 Bear Wallow, Ky., Sept. 20, 1862 1 Big Shanty, Ga., June 9, 1864 2 Ncar Macon, Ga., May 5, 1865 2 Lavergne, Tenn., Oct. 8, 1862 1 McAfee's X Roads, June 11, 1864 2 Picket Duty 2 Bowling Green, Ky., Oct. 22, 1862 1 Noonday Creek, Ga., June 20, 1864 3 Guerrillas 2 Stone's River, Tenn., Dec. 31, 1862 5 Flat Rock, Ga., July 28, 1864 1 Place unknown 2     Atlanta, Ga., Aug. 12, 1864 3     notes.--Organized at Harrisburg in the fall of 1861, from companies in various parts of the State. It left Harrisburg, <
-- 180 8th Connecticut Rodman's Ninth 34 139 21 194 108th New York French's Second 26 122 47 195 42d New York Sedgwick's Second 35 127 19 181 130th Pennsylvania French's Second 32 146 -- 178 Iuka, Miss.             Sept. 19, 1862.             5th Iowa Hamilton's ---------- 37 179 1 217 48th Indiana Hamilton's ---------- 37 56 7 100 26th Missouri Hamilton's ---------- 21 75 1 97 11th Missouri Stanley's ---------- 7 66 3 76 Shepherdstown, Va.             Sept. 20, 1862             118th Pennsylvania Morell's Fifth 63 101 105 269 Newtonia, Mo.             Sept. 30, 1862.             9th Wisconsin Salomon's ---------- 25 51 116 192 Corinth, Miss.             Oct. 3, 4, 1862.             63d Ohio Stanley's ---------- 24 105 3 132 9th Illinois Davies's ---------- 11 82 55 148 7th Iowa Davies's ---------- 21 87 14 122 47th Illinois Stanley's ---------- 19 79 10 108 12th Illinois Davie
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington, Chapter 15: Confederate losses — strength of the Confederate Armies--casualties in Confederate regiments — list of Confederate Generals killed — losses in the Confederate Navy. (search)
on the 14th.89 9th Louisiana Starke's Jackson's 25 57 -- 82 49th North Carolina Ransom's Walker's 16 61 -- 77 Munfordville, Ky.             Sept. 14-17, 1862.             10th Mississippi Chalmers's Withers's 13 95 -- 108 Iuka, Miss.             Sept. 19, 1862.             3d Texas (dismounted cav'y) Hebert's Little's 22 74 -- 96 1st Texas Legion Hebert's Little's 18 80 1 99 40th Mississippi Hebert's Little's 10 39 21 70 Shepherdstown, Va.             Sept. 20, 1862.             14th South Carolina Gregg's A. P. Hill's 10 45 -- 55 Corinth, Miss. Includes loss at Hatchie Bridge, October 5th.             Oct 3-5, 1862.             6th Texas Phifer's Maury's 55 63 30 148 35th Mississippi Moore's Maury's 32 110 347 489 6th Missouri Green's Hebert's 31 130 53 214 2d Missouri Gates's Hebert's 19 122 21 162 43d Mississippi Green's Hebert's 13 56 156 225 21st Arkansas Cabell's Maury's 27
Colonel McMillen's report. Headquabters Ninety-Fifth regiment O. V. L., camp Chase, September 20, 1862. Governor: I have the honor to submit the following report of the part taken by the Ninon, A. A.G. Report of General Cox. headquarters Kanawha division, Ninth army corps, Sept. 20, 1862. Lieutenant-Colonel L. Richmond, A. A.G., General Burnside's Headquarters, Right Wing Army oeport of Colonel Meredith. Gibbon's brigade headquarters, camp near Sharpsburgh, Md., September 20, 1862. Hon. O. P. Morton, Governor of Indiana: dear sir: I most respectfully submit to you tholonel Kimball's report. headquarters Ninth New-York volunteers, near Sharpsburgh, Md., Sept. 20, 1862. Colonel: I beg to report that in accordance with your orders I left Frederick with my reoc. 126.-the battle of Iuka, Miss. Official report of General Grant. Iuka, Miss., September 20, 1862. To Major-General Halleck, General-in-Chief: General Rosecrans, with Stanley and Hamilt
eived in the last action near Richmond may speedily heal, and that you may soon be able to take the field again. I herewith transmit the report of Col. Mahan, of the Fifty-fifth Indiana; and as soon as reports are received from the other regiments of my command, I will forward them to you. I am, sir, very respectfully, yours, M. D. Manson, Brigadier-General Commanding Forces at Richmond. Colonel McMillen's report. Headquabters Ninety-Fifth regiment O. V. L., camp Chase, September 20, 1862. Governor: I have the honor to submit the following report of the part taken by the Ninety-fifth regiment Ohio volunteers, in the battles before Richmond, Kentucky, on Saturday, August thirtieth, 1862. About three o'clock P. M., on Friday, twenty-ninth of August, I received an order from Brigadier-General Cruft, commanding the Twenty-first brigade of the army of Kentucky, directing me to form my regiment quietly in line of battle, and to wait further orders. The regiment remaine
wounded. I am, Major, very respectfully, your obedient servant, A. Doubleday, Brigadier-General Volunteers, Commanding Division. Major Jos. Dickenson, A. A.G. Report of General Cox. headquarters Kanawha division, Ninth army corps, Sept. 20, 1862. Lieutenant-Colonel L. Richmond, A. A.G., General Burnside's Headquarters, Right Wing Army of the Potomac: sir: I have the honor to submit the following report of the part taken by the Kanawha division, Ninth army corps, Major-General Burnnown they very greatly exceeded our own. Very respectfully, Your obedient servant, J. D. Cox, Brig.-General, Commanding Kanawha Division. Report of Colonel Meredith. Gibbon's brigade headquarters, camp near Sharpsburgh, Md., September 20, 1862. Hon. O. P. Morton, Governor of Indiana: dear sir: I most respectfully submit to you the following report of the part taken by the Nineteenth Indiana volunteers in the battle of the fourteenth instant, at South-Mountain. On the evening
men in action, especially of the true soldierly bearing of Col. Goodrich, the daring and courage of Lieut.-Col. Austin, and the valuable service of Capt. Redington, of the Sixtieth New-York, and First Lieutenant McGregor, of the Seventy-eighth New-York, the two last having charge of the skirmishers. Respectfully submitted. Charles R. Brundage, Lieutenant Commanding Third Brigade. Lieut.-Colonel Kimball's report. headquarters Ninth New-York volunteers, near Sharpsburgh, Md., Sept. 20, 1862. Colonel: I beg to report that in accordance with your orders I left Frederick with my regiment on the morning of the thirteenth, and took position about three miles on the Jefferson road. I here received orders from Colonel Rush, of the United States Lancers, to reconnoitre the enemy, who was reported in front in position with artillery and cavalry. I did so by throwing forward company B, Lieut. Bartholomew, on the left, who soon reported the enemy as having left the position he oc
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