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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 49 49 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 32 32 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 13 13 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 9 9 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 9 9 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 5 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 4 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 4 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 3 3 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 2 2 Browse Search
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remendous hill over felled timber, which lay thickly upon it-the enemy's guns, supported by infantry in intrenchments, playing upon them all the while. What was their relief, therefore, to descry the white flag waving from the battlements! He thinks that, in the hands of resolute men, the position would have been impregnable. Thank God, the Yankees thought differently, and surrendered, thus saving many valuable lives, and giving us a grand success. May they ever be thus minded! September 30th, 1862. The Richmond Examiner of yesterday contains Lincoln's Proclamation, declaring all the negroes free from the 1st of January next The Abolition papers are in ecstasies; as if they did not know that it can only be carried out within their lines, and there they have been practically free from the moment we were invaded. The New York Tribune is greatly incensed at the capture of Harper's Ferry; acknowledges that the battle of Sharpsburg was a disaster to them-Sumner's corps alone hav
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The case of Fitz John Porter. (search)
the operations of the army under the command of Major-General D. C. Buell, in Kentucky and Tennessee, and punishment even inflicted, as in the former, without charges, or arraignment, and without other trial. No charges preferred against General Porter by General Pope have been found, save in his official reports of September 3d, 1862, and January 27th, 1863; and General Pope testified before the court-martial that he had in fact preferred none. In his letter to General Halleck of September 30th, 1862, General Pope speaks of having laid before the Government the conduct of McClellan, Porter, and Griffin, and of being not disposed to push the matter farther unless the silence of the Government . . . and the restoration of these officers without trial to their commands, coupled with my banishment to a distant and unimportant department, render it necessary as an act of justice to myself. In his reply, October 10th, Halleck says: Again you complain that Porter and Griffin have not be
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Iuka and Corinth. (search)
, 14; w, 111: m, 24 = 149. Artillery, Capt. Andrew u Hicken-looper: F, 2d Ill., Lieut. J. W. Mitchell; 1st Minn., Lieut. G. F. Cooke; 3d Ohio (section), Capt. Emil Munch, Sergt. Sylvanus Clark; 5th Ohio, Lieut. B. S. Matson; 10th Ohio, Capt. H. B. White. Artillery loss: w, 8. Total Union loss: killed, 355; wounded, 1841; captured or missing, 324 = 2520. The effective strength of Rosecrans's command is not specifically stated in the Official Records. According to the return for September 30th, 1862, his aggregate present for duty was 23,077 (Vol. XVII., Pt. II., p. 246). Probably not less than twenty thousand participated in the battle. On page 172, Vol. XVII., Pt. I., General Rosecrans estimates the Confederate strength at nearly forty thousand and says that was almost double his own numbers. The Confederate forces. Army of West Tennessee.--Major-General Earl Van Dorn. Price's Corps or Army of the West.--Major-General Sterling Price. first division, Brig.-Gen. Lo
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces at Corinth, Miss., October 3d and 4th, 1862. (search)
, 14; w, 111: m, 24 = 149. Artillery, Capt. Andrew u Hicken-looper: F, 2d Ill., Lieut. J. W. Mitchell; 1st Minn., Lieut. G. F. Cooke; 3d Ohio (section), Capt. Emil Munch, Sergt. Sylvanus Clark; 5th Ohio, Lieut. B. S. Matson; 10th Ohio, Capt. H. B. White. Artillery loss: w, 8. Total Union loss: killed, 355; wounded, 1841; captured or missing, 324 = 2520. The effective strength of Rosecrans's command is not specifically stated in the Official Records. According to the return for September 30th, 1862, his aggregate present for duty was 23,077 (Vol. XVII., Pt. II., p. 246). Probably not less than twenty thousand participated in the battle. On page 172, Vol. XVII., Pt. I., General Rosecrans estimates the Confederate strength at nearly forty thousand and says that was almost double his own numbers. The Confederate forces. Army of West Tennessee.--Major-General Earl Van Dorn. Price's Corps or Army of the West.--Major-General Sterling Price. first division, Brig.-Gen. Lo
Present, also, at Missionary Ridge; Rocky Face Ridge; Cassville; Lost Mountain; Sherman's March; The Carolinas; Averasboro. notes.--Organized at Binghamton, N. Y., from companies raised in the Twenty-fourth Senatorial District,--Broome, Tompkins, and Tioga counties. Recruiting commenced August 15, 1862, the full regiment being mustcred into service on the 25th of the following month. Leaving Binghamton, two days later, 1,008 strong, it went to Harper's Ferry, arriving there on September 30, 1862. While there it was assigned to the Third Brigade, Second Division (Geary's), Twelfth Corps--the White star Division — in which it remained permanently. This regiment won special honors at Gettysburg, then in Greene's Brigade, which, alone and unassisted, held Culp's Hill during a critical period of that battle against a desperate attack of vastly superior force. The casualties in the One Hundred and Thirty-seventh at Gettysburg exceeded those of any other regiment in the Corps, amo
ew York Sedgwick's Second 35 127 19 181 130th Pennsylvania French's Second 32 146 -- 178 Iuka, Miss.             Sept. 19, 1862.             5th Iowa Hamilton's ---------- 37 179 1 217 48th Indiana Hamilton's ---------- 37 56 7 100 26th Missouri Hamilton's ---------- 21 75 1 97 11th Missouri Stanley's ---------- 7 66 3 76 Shepherdstown, Va.             Sept. 20, 1862             118th Pennsylvania Morell's Fifth 63 101 105 269 Newtonia, Mo.             Sept. 30, 1862.             9th Wisconsin Salomon's ---------- 25 51 116 192 Corinth, Miss.             Oct. 3, 4, 1862.             63d Ohio Stanley's ---------- 24 105 3 132 9th Illinois Davies's ---------- 11 82 55 148 7th Iowa Davies's ---------- 21 87 14 122 47th Illinois Stanley's ---------- 19 79 10 108 12th Illinois Davies's ---------- 15 79 15 109 14th Wisconsin McKean's ---------- 27 50 21 98 43d Ohio Stanley's ----------
ers and men were immediately paroled, and are about to start for the Ohio River. I have the honor to be, your ob't servant, J. T. Wilder, Colonel Commanding U. S. Forces at Green River. Colonel Dunham's report. Louisville, Ky., September 30, 1862. To the A. A. General and Chief of Staff of the Army of Kentucky: sir: I have the honor to report that in obedience to an order of Major-General Gilbert, on the thirteenth instant, at eleven o'clock P. M. left the depot of the Louisvillee, owing to the haste of the pursuit from that point. Four hundred small arms were taken from the opposite side of the Potomac. Geo. B. Mcclellan, Major-General Commanding. General Halleck to General McClellan. Washington, D. C., September 30, 1862. Major-General McClellan, Commanding, etc.: General: Your report of yesterday, giving the results of the battles of South-Mountain and Antietam, has been received and submitted to the President. They were not only hard-fought battles, b
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 121.-surrender of Munfordville, Ky. (search)
n Wednesday morning, at two A. M., marching out of the works at six A. M., with all the honors of war, drums beating and colors flying, we being allowed, by the terms of surrender, our side-arms and all private property, and four days rations. Officers and men were immediately paroled, and are about to start for the Ohio River. I have the honor to be, your ob't servant, J. T. Wilder, Colonel Commanding U. S. Forces at Green River. Colonel Dunham's report. Louisville, Ky., September 30, 1862. To the A. A. General and Chief of Staff of the Army of Kentucky: sir: I have the honor to report that in obedience to an order of Major-General Gilbert, on the thirteenth instant, at eleven o'clock P. M. left the depot of the Louisville and Nashville Railroad with six companies of the Fiftieth regiment Indiana volunteers, and one company (K) of the Seventy-eighth Indiana, attached to the Fiftieth for duty — in all four hundred and forty-six strong, rank and file — for Green River,
tam 14,000 small arms were collected, besides the large number carried off by citizens and those distributed on the ground to recruits and other unarmed men, arriving immediately after the battle. At South-Mountain no collection of small arms was made, owing to the haste of the pursuit from that point. Four hundred small arms were taken from the opposite side of the Potomac. Geo. B. Mcclellan, Major-General Commanding. General Halleck to General McClellan. Washington, D. C., September 30, 1862. Major-General McClellan, Commanding, etc.: General: Your report of yesterday, giving the results of the battles of South-Mountain and Antietam, has been received and submitted to the President. They were not only hard-fought battles, but well-earned and decided victories. The valor and endurance of your army in the several conflicts which terminated in the expulsion of the enemy from the loyal State of Maryland, are creditable alike to the troops and to the officers who command
ther parts of the St. John's River as should contain rebel works: Forty-seventh regiment Pennsylvania volunteers, Col. T. H. Good, effective strength, 825; Seventh regiment Connecticut volunteers, Col. Jos. Hawley, effective strength, 647; section of First Connecticut light battery, Lieut. Cannon, effective strength, 41 ; detachment of First Massachusetts cavalry, Captain Case, effective strength, 60: total, 1573. The expedition left Hilton Head, S. C., on the afternoon of the thirtieth of September, 1862, on the transports Ben Deford, Boston, Cosmopolitan, and Neptune, and arrived off the bar of St. John's River early on the following morning, October the first, but was unable to enter the river until two P. M. the same day, owing to the shallowness of the channel. This expedition was joined by the following fleet of gunboats, Captain Charles Steedman, United States Navy, commanding, ordered to cooperate with it: Paul Jones, (flag-ship,) Cimerone, (Captain Woodhull,) Water Witch,
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