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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 29 29 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 9 9 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 9 9 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 8 8 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 4 4 Browse Search
John D. Billings, The history of the Tenth Massachusetts battery of light artillery in the war of the rebellion 3 3 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 3 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 2 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 2 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 2 Browse Search
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General Stuart gave me a gratifying proof that he had been thinking of me in Pennsylvania, by bringing back with him an excellent bay horse which he had himself selected for my riding. As I am fortunate enough to have General Stuart's own official report in Ms. of this memorable enterprise among my papers, I give it here, in the belief that the reader will be glad to follow our horsemen upon their journey in the words of the dashing raider himself. headquarters, cavalry division, October 14, 1862. To General R. E. Lee, Through Colonel R. H. Chilton, A. A. General, Army of Northern Virginia. Colonel,--I have the honour to report that on the 9th inst., in compliance with instructions from the Commanding General, Army of Northern Virginia, I proceeded on an expedition into Pennsylvania with a cavalry force of 1800 men and four pieces of horse-artillery, under command of Brig.-Gen. Hampton and Cols. W. H. F. Lee and Jones. This force rendezvoused at Darkesville at 12 o'clock, a
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XIX. October, 1862 (search)
adjutants. So the command of the Secretary of War is approved by the New Yorker, Smith, after being first manipulated by Winder. It is an improvement, at all events, on the late mode of sending out spies-they cannot get passports for bribes now, without Smith's adjutant knowing something about it. Heretofore the Plug Uglies might take the bribe, and by their influence with Gen. Winder, obtain his signature to a blank passport. The following was received yesterday: Winchester, Va., Oct. 14, 1862. Hon. G. W. Randolph. The cavalry expedition to Pennsylvania has returned safe. They passed through Mercersburg, Chambersburg, Emmetsburg, Liberty, New Market, Syattstown, and Burnesville. The expedition crossed the Potomac above Williamsport, and recrossed at White's Ford, making the entire circuit, cutting the enemy's communications, destroying arms, etc., and obtaining many recruits. R. E. Lee, General. Thus, Gen. Stuart has made another circle round the enemy's army; and
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The defense of Vicksburg. (search)
ominent points I purposed to occupy with a system of redoubts, redans, lunettes, and small field-works, connecting them by rifle-pits so as to give a continuous line of defense. The work of construction was begun about the 1st of September with a force of negro laborers hired or impressed from the plantations of the adjacent counties. Haynes's Bluff on the Yazoo River and Warrenton, about six miles below Vicksburg, were fortified as flank protections to the main position. On the 14th of October, 1862, Lieutenant-General John C. Pemberton took command of the Department of Mississippi and East Louisiana, establishing his headquarters at Jackson. About the same time General Grant was placed in supreme command of the Federal forces in north Mississippi. Then followed a succession of movements against Vicksburg, having for their object the turning of that point. They were all uniformly unsuccessful, and were so remote from the city, with one exception, that the garrison of Vicksburg
pressions of numbers and mass in one case, or of space in the other. The following extract from General McClellan's Report will, we presume, be read with some surprise by most of our readers, as well as with interest. In a letter dated October 14, 1862, the general-in-chief says,-- It is also reported to me that the number of animals with your army in the field is about thirty-one thousand. It is believed that your present proportion of cavalry and of animals is much larger than that oand General McClellan distinctly states that on the 21st of October, after deducting the force engaged in picketing the river, he had but about a thousand serviceable cavalry-horses. General Halleck, in a letter to General McClellan dated October 14, 1862, in reply to a despatch of the 12th, says,-- In regard to horses, you say that the present rate of supply is only one hundred and fifty per week for the entire army here and in front of Washington. I find from the records that the issues
This list is furnished from the men actually buried, and the wounded in the hospitals. Some of the missing have since returned, having been taken prisoners while going for water, and paroled. The brigade went into action two thousand two hundred and fifty (2250) strong, including Simonson's battery. Very respectfully, L. A. Harris, Colonel Commanding Ninth Brigade. Report of Colonel Gooding. headquarters Thirtieth brigade, Ninth division army of the Ohio, Danville, Ky., Oct. 14, 1862. Gen. R. B. Mitchell, Commanding Division: sir: In obedience to your order requiring me to furnish a report of the part taken by my brigade in the late battle of Perryville, I have the honor herewith to submit the following: As ordered, I had massed my brigade in the edge of a dense wood, joining General Rousseau's right, to await your orders. Precisely at half-past 3 o'clock P. M., I received orders directly from Major-General Gilbert, Commanding Third corps d'armee, to proceed i
f this order as authorizes seizures of persons and property, will not take effect until the command crosses the Pennsylvania line. The utmost activity is enjoined upon the detachments procuring horses, and unceasing vigilance upon the entire command. Major J. P. W. Hairston is hereby appointed Division Provost-Marshal. By command of Major-General J. E. B. Stuart. R. Channing Price, First Lieutenant and A. D. C. General Stuart's report. headquarters cavalry division, October 14, 1862. Col. R. H. Chilton, A. A. General Army Northern Virginia: Colonel: I have the honor to report that on the ninth instant, in compliance with instructions from the commanding general army of Northern Virginia, I proceeded on an expedition into Pennsylvania, with a cavalry force of one thousand eight hundred men and four pieces of horse-artillery, under command of Brig.-Gen. Hampton and Colonels W. H. F. Lee and Jones. This force rendezvoused at Darksville at twelve M., and marched th
I am, sir, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, J. G. Walker, Brigadier-General, commanding Division. Report of Brigadier-General Walker of battle of Sharpsburg. headquarters Walker's division, camp near Winchester, Va., October 14, 1862. Major G. M. Sorrell, A. A. G., Right Wing, Army of Northern Virginia: Major: I have the honor to make the following report of the part borne by the division under my command in the battle of Sharpsburg, Maryland, on the seventeenth of Se. Johnson. The loss of the brigade was six killed and forty-nine wounded. Respectfully, your obedient servant, J. L. Archer, Brigadier-General, commanding. Report of Brigadier-General Pender. Camp near Bunkersville, Virginia, October 14, 1862. Lieutenant-General T. J. Jackson: General: I have the honor to make the following report of the part taken by my brigade in the battle of Manassas Junction, the two days fighting at Manassas, the battles of Ox Hill, Harper's Ferry, Sharp
arge portion of the public press, for an imputed failure to provide adequately for the subsistence of the garrison of Vicksburg and Port Hudson. The government and my immediate military superior, perhaps better informed of facts, have, so far as I am aware, refrained from censure, reserving a decision until a full investigation shall have determined to what extent, if any, it is deserved. Immediately on assuming command of the Department of Mississippi and East Louisiana, on the fourteenth of October, 1862, I gave my earnest and unremitting attention to the reorganization of the several staff departments, and to the great question of supplies. It is unnecessary to speak of the great confusion and general want of system which prevailed. I found most of the district commanders exercising the authority which pertained only to the department commander, or to a General commanding an army in the field; each appeared in a great measure to be acting independently of the other. To some con
em. I, therefore, recommend that Second Lieutenant S. T. Clark, Company A, Fifteenth Mississippi regiment, be dismissed in disgrace, and that Corporal Bennett, and privates Applegate and Spiney, Company B, be drummed out of the service, and their names published with the sentence attached. Very respectfully, John S. Bowen, Brigadier-General, commanding. Report of Brigadier-General Villepigue. headquarters Second brigade, First division, army of District of the Mississippi, October 14, 1862.) Lieutenant-Colonel Edward Ivey, Assistant Adjutant-General, First Division, Army District of the Mississippi: Colonel: I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of the Second brigade, in the actions before Corinth, on the third and fourth instants: In approaching Corinth on the third instant, the Second brigade was in advance. An outpost of the enemy was met about five miles from the fortress, and driven into the outer intrenchments without much oppositi
turned in as unfit for service; thus leaving the active army some 700 short of the number required to make good existing deficiencies, to say nothing of providing remounts for men whose horses had died or been killed during the campaign and those previously dismounted. Notwithstanding all the efforts made to obtain a remount, there were, after deducting the force engaged in picketing the river, but about a thousand serviceable cavalry horses on the 21st day of Oct. In a letter dated Oct. 14, 1862, the general-in-chief says: It is also reported to me that the number of animals with your army in the field is about 31,000. It is believed that your present proportion of cavalry and of animals is much larger than that of any other of our armies. What number of animals our other armies had I am not prepared to say, but military men in European armies have been of the opinion that an army to be efficient, while carrying on active operations in the field, should have a cavalry force
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