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any innovation which, by comparison, should throw them into the background, for by that time the esprit de corps, the pride of organization, had begun to make itself felt. Realizing this fact, and regarding it as a manifestation that might be turned to good account, Major-General Joseph Hooker promulgated a scheme of army corps badges on the 21st of March, 1863, which was the first systematic plan submitted in this direction in the armies. Hooker took command of the Army of the Potomac Jan. 26, 1863. General Daniel Butterfield was made his chief-of-staff, and he, it is said, had much to do with designing and perfecting the first scheme of badges for the army, which appears in the following circular ;-- Headquarters Army of the Potomac. Circular. March 21, 1863. For the purpose of ready recognition of corps and divisions of the army, and to prevent injustice by reports of straggling and misconduct through mistake as to their organizations, the chief quartermaster will furnish
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 10: Sharpsburg and Fredericksburg. (search)
rom the Army Generals Hooker, Brooks, Cochrane, and Newton, and relieving from their commands Generals Franklin, W. F. Smith, Sturgis, Ferrero, and Colonel Joseph Taylor, Sumner's adjutant general. To approve the order, or accept his resignation, was the alternative presented to the President. Mr. Lincoln accepted his resignation, and immediately placed the baton of the army commander in the hands of Joseph Hooker, the head and front of the caballed officers. Mr. Lincoln's letter of January 26, 1863, to Hooker, is characteristic. He tells him he has thwarted Burnside as much as he could, doing a great wrong to his country and to a most meritorious brother officer; that he had heard of his saying that both the army and country needed a dictator. What I ask, he adds, is military success. In that event I will risk the dictatorship ; and concludes by begging him to Beware of rashness! Hooker, or Fighting Joe, as he was sometimes called, had managed a corps well, possessed persona
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Army Life in a Black Regiment, chapter 14 (search)
red out, &c. Geo. D. Walker, N. Y. Vol. Eng., Oct. 13, 1862; Captain, Aug. 11, 1863. W. H. Danilson, 48th N. Y., Oct. 13, 1862; Captain, July 26, 1863. J. H. Thibadeau, 8th Me., Oct. 13, 1862; Captain, Jan. 10, 1863. Ephraaim P. WrtITE, 8th Me., Nov. 14, 1862; Resigned, March 9, 1864. Jas. Pomeroy, 100th Pa., Oct. 13, 1862; Resigned, Feb. 9, 1863. Jas. F. Johnston, 100th Pa., Oct. 13, 1862: Resigned, March 26, 1863. Jesse Fisher, 48th N. Y., Oct. 13, 1862; Resigned, Jan. 26, 1863. Chas. I. Davis, 8th Me., Oct. 13, 1862; Resigned, Feb. 28, 1863. Wm. Stockdale, 8th Me., Oct. 13, 1862; Resigned, May 2, 1863. Jas. B. O'Neil, Promotion, Jan. 10, 1863; Resigned, May 2, 1863. W. W. Sampson, Promotion, Jan. 10, 1863; Captain, Oct. 30, 1863. J. M. Thompson, Promotion, Jan. 27, 1863; Captain, Oct. 30, 1863. R. M. Gaston, Promotion, April 15, 1863; Killed at Coosaw Ferry, S. C., May 27, 1863. Jas. B. West, Promotion, Feb. 28, 1863; Resigned, June 14
Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert, Chapter 12: between Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville (search)
is military history, with which we were familiar, we knew our man. We knew also the atmosphere that surrounded his appointment, but I for one never saw, until long after the war, the remarkable letter of Mr. Lincoln to his appointee, which not only revives and bears out my recollection of the spirit of the times, but fills me with amazement that a self-respectful officer could have accepted an appointment confirmed or accompanied by such a letter: executive mansion, Washington, D. C., January 26, 1863. Major-General Hooker: General:--I have placed you at the head of the Army of the Potomac. Of course I have done this upon what appears to me to be sufficient reasons. And yet I think it best for you to know that there are some things in regard to which I am not quite satisfied with you. I believe you to be a brave and skilful soldier, which, of course, I like. I also believe you do not mix politics with your profession, in which you are right. You have confidence in yourself, wh
Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert, Chapter 13: Chancellorsville (search)
son of his being brought, under the circumstances, into comparison with Lee's matchless second and his absolutely perfect appreciation, support, and execution of the plans of his great chief in this the most brilliant of his battles. Hooker's own part in these operations would seem to have been more creditable, but his great weakness was a tendency to boasting. There was a striking contrast between the records he made for himself in his order book and in the field. When, on the 26th of January, 1863, he took command of the Army of the Potomac, his first act was to christen it in the memorable, high-sounding phrase-The finest Army on the Planet. On the same day, in General Order No. 1, he emphasized the inferiority of its enemy, and added: Let us never hesitate to give him battle whenever we can find him. After just three months of waiting he did find him, right across the river where he had all the time been, and moved upon him. Then, after three days of really skilful maneuve
such colored volunteer, on being mustered into the service, shall be free. The report of the Conference Committee was agreed to by the two Houses respectively, and the bill, thus amended, became the law of the land. By a section of the-Act of 1862, aforesaid, the said persons of African descent were to be paid $10 per month, $3 of it in clothing; while the pay of the White soldiers was $13 per month, beside clothing. Gov. Andrew, of Mass., on his solicitation, was authorized Jan. 26, 1863. by Secretary Stanton to raise of three years men volunteer companies of artillery for duty in the forts of Massachusetts and elsewhere, and such companies of infantry for the volunteer military service as he may find convenient, and may include persons of African descent, organized into separate corps. Under this order, Gov. A. proceeded to raise two full regiments of Blacks, known as the 54th and 55th Massachusetts; which in due time were mustered without objection into the service of
ng of spring. Major-General Joseph Hooker, popularly known as Fighting Joe Hooker, who had succeeded Burnside in command of the Army of the Potomac, soon had A man of whom much was expected General Joseph Hooker. A daring and experienced veteran of the Mexican War, Hooker had risen in the Civil War from brigade commander to be the commander of a grand division of the Army of the Potomac, and had never been found wanting. His advancement to the head of the Army of the Potomac, on January 26, 1863, was a tragic episode in his own career and in that of the Federal arms. Gloom hung heavy over the North after Fredericksburg. Upon Hooker fell the difficult task of redeeming the unfulfilled political pledges for a speedy lifting of that gloom. It was his fortune only to deepen it. the troops on a splendid campaign footing by a positive and vigorous method of reorganization, and aroused them to enthusiastic loyalty. It was the month of April, and field and woodland had begun to
, Second Bull Run, Chantilly, South Mountain and Antietam. He commanded the center grand division of the Army of the Potomac at Fredericksburg. At last, on January 26, 1863, he was assigned by President Lincoln to the command of the Army of the Potomac. On the 4th of May, 1863, his right flank was surprised by Jackson at Chanceary, 1863. The successive commanders of the Army of the Potomac were: Major-General George B. McClellan to November 9, 1862; Major-General A. E. Burnside to January 26, 1863; Major-General Joseph Hooker to June 28, 1863, being succeeded by Major-General George G. Meade, who remained at its head until it was discontinued, June 28,2, he rose to corps commander, and was at the head of the Center Grand Division in Burnside's organization. He was commander of the Army of the Potomac from January 26, 1863, to June 28th. Later, he exhibited great gallantry as corps commander at Lookout Mountain, and in the Atlanta campaign. On October 1, 1864, he was placed a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 6.34 (search)
our years had borne upon their bayonets the mightiest Revolt in history. Nor shall those men ever forget the generous bearing of the victorious host, which even in that supreme moment of triumph remembered that this gaunt remnant were the survivors of an army which but two years before had dealt them such staggering blows that there were more deserters from the Army of the Potomac than there were men for duty in the Army of Northern Virginia At the moment I was placed in command (26th January, 1863), I caused a return to be made of the absentees of the army, and found the number to be 2,922 commissioned officers and 81,964 non-commissioned officers and privates. The desertions were at the rate of about 200 a day. --Testimony of Major-General Joseph Hooker before the Congressional Committee, March 11th, 1865, Report on the Conduct of the War, vol. i, p. 112. The field returns for month of January, 1863, give 72,226 men for duty in the whole Department of Northern Virginia.--that
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 12.89 (search)
enerals Burnside, Sumner and Franklin, his right and left grand division commanders, from duty, and placed Major-General Hooker in command of the army. They were removed, the order states, at their own request. But Burnside (Report of Committee on Conduct of War, page 721) says the order did not express the facts in the case as far as he was concerned. The day after Hooker was placed in command he read the following letter from Mr. Lincoln: Executive mansion, Washington, D. C., January 26, 1863. Major-General Hooker: General — I have placed you at the head of the Army of the Potomac. Of course I have done this upon what appears to me to be sufficient reasons. And yet I think it best for you to know that there are some things in regard to which I am not quite satisfied with you. I believe you to be a brave and skillful soldier, which, of course, I like. I also believe you do not mix politics with your profession, in which you are right. You have confidence in yourself, w
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