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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 1.1 (search)
breached, and both guns and gunners were fully exposed. Nevertheless, after a four-hours' combat the monitor slowly retired, evidently in a damaged condition. The importance of the success of this engagement lay in the demonstrated fact that iron-clads were not as formidable as they were supposed to be against land-batteries. As yet, their final test of invulnerability had not been fully ascertained. Reflecting upon the result of that encounter, I wrote to Brigadier-General Ripley, February 8th, 1863, minute instructions, But I consider also that the attack on Sumter, whenever it takes place, will probably be made at long range with their heaviest guns and mortars. This being admitted, they will necessarily attack it where it is weakest,--i. e., the gorge, south-east angle, and east face,--taking their position close along the eastern shore of Morris Island, after silencing Wagner. By adopting this plan their steamers, gun-boats, etc., would be, moreover, farther removed fro
ugust 8th of that year, the Secretary of War was informed by the chief of ordnance that the use of American iron was what the ordnance officers were striving for without success. The Diversity of the Federal ordnance — Wiard gun batteries This view of the Washington Arsenal yard shows three batteries of Wiard steel guns. This was only one of many types which added to the complexity of the armaments of the Federal ordnance. It is recorded that the artillery with Rosecrans's Army February 8, 1863, included thirty-two 6-pounder smooth-bores, twenty-four 12-pounder howitzers, eight 12-pounder light Napoleons, twenty-one James rifles, thirty-four 10-pounder Wiard steel guns, two 6-pounder Wiard steel guns, two 16-pounder Parrotts, and four 3-inch rifle ordnance guns. Of the batteries here shown, two were rejected on account of reported defects in the guns. A 6-Pounder Wiard — a modern-appearing type Every inducement had been offered to manufacturers to prepare iron of a suit
and each small organization — company or battalion — entrenched its own part of the line. In timber, huge logs were placed in position and Soft walls better defenses than hard --Fort Sumter In 1863, the stone walls of Sumter were soon breached by the guns of the Federal fleet, but behind the breaches rose many feet of gabions filled with earth. These were replaced as fast as the guns of the fleet dislodged the soft earth. General G. T. Beauregard wrote in his official report of February 8, 1863: The introduction of heavy rifled guns and iron-clad steamers in the attack of masonry forts has greatly changed the condition of the problem applicable to Fort Sumter when it was built, and we must now use the few and imperfect means at our command to increase its defensive features as far as practicable. This beautiful view of Fort Sumter in 1865, clear in every detail, one of Barnard's photographic masterpieces, shows the battered parapets of the Fort strengthened again and again by
e as they were thought, against sand-batteries. Very little was known at that time of the capacity of the newly-built and so much talked — of Federal monitors and ironclads. Hence the importance of the result secured by this attack. General Beauregard had drawn his conclusions accordingly, and, in prevision of the danger threatening the works in front of Charleston, wrote the following letter to General Ripley: Headquarters, Department S. C., Ga., and Fla., Charleston, S. C., Feb. 8th, 1863. Brig.-Genl. R. S. Ripley, Commanding First Mil. Dist., Charleston, S. C.: General,—The recent attack of the enemy's ironclad monitor Montauk on the battery at Genesis Point (the first day at about one mile, and the second at about eight hundred or one thousand yards) would seem to indicate that the enemy is not so confident of the invulnerability of this kind of naval vessels. But I consider also that the attack on Sumter, whenever it takes place, will probably be made at long range
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles, Mississippi, 1863 (search)
e RiverMISSOURI--Battery "I" 1st Light Arty. Jan. 27: Skirmish, Centre HillILLINOIS--4th Cavalry. Feb. 2-5: Passage of Vicksburg and Warrenton BatteriesU. S. Ram "Queen of the West." Capture of Steamers "A. W. Baker," "Moro" and "Berwick Bay." Feb. 8: Affair near Camp SheldonMISSOURI--18th Infantry (Detachment). Union loss, 1 wounded. Feb. 8: Skirmish, Horn Lake CreekILLINOIS--2d Cavalry. Feb. 10: Affair near Camp SheldonMISSOURI--18th Infantry (Detachment). Feb. 11: Skirmish, Newcombe CreFeb. 8: Skirmish, Horn Lake CreekILLINOIS--2d Cavalry. Feb. 10: Affair near Camp SheldonMISSOURI--18th Infantry (Detachment). Feb. 11: Skirmish, Newcombe CreekILLINOIS--2d Cavalry. Feb. 14-29: Exp. from Greenville to Cypress Bend, ArkILLINOIS--2d Cavalry (Detachment). INDIANA--16th, 60th and 67th Infantry. MISSOURI--6th Cavalry (Detachment). OHIO--17th Indpt. Battery Light Arty.; 83d Infantry. WISCONSIN--23d Infantry. Feb. 16: Skirmish, Yazoo PassINDIANA--34th Infantry. IOWA--33d Infantry. Feb. 19: Skirmish, BurnsvilleILLINOIS--15th Cavalry. Feb. 19: Skirmish near Coldwater RiverINDIANA--1st Cavalry. Feb. 19: Skirmish near Yazoo PassINDIANA--1s
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles, Missouri, 1863 (search)
CarthageWISCONSIN--3d Cavalry. Jan. 21: Skirmish near ColumbiaMISSOURI--61st Enrolled Militia (Detachment). Union loss, 2 wounded. Jan. 27: Skirmish, BloomfieldMISSOURI--6th and 8th Enrolled Militia. Feb. 2-13: Scouts about Mingo SwampMISSOURI--12th State Militia Cavalry. Feb. 3: Skirmish, IndependenceMISSOURI--5th (Old) State Militia Cavalry. Feb. 3: Skirmish, Mingo SwampMISSOURI--12th State Militia Cavalry. Feb. 5: Skirmish, Bear Creek, Johnson CountyMISSOURI--40th Enrolled Militia. Feb. 8: Skirmish, IndependenceMISSOURI--5th State Militia Cavalry. Feb. 10: Skirmish, Sarcoxie Prairie, Newton CountyMISSOURI--8th State Militia Cavalry. Feb. 19: Skirmish, Spring RiverKANSAS--9th Cavalry (1 Co.). Feb. 19-22: Scouts in Barton and Jasper CountiesMISSOURI--8th State Militia Cavalry. March 1-2: Skirmishes, BloomfieldMISSOURI--2d State Militia Cavalry (Detachment). March 2: Skirmish, NeoshoKANSAS--3d Indian Home Guard. March 3: Raid on GranbyMISSOURI--8th State Militia Cavalry (D
H. G. Berry Brigadier GeneralFeb. 8, 1863, to May 3, 1863.Killed.2d Division, Third Army Corps, Army of the Potomac Brigadier GeneralMarch 13, 1862, to Aug. 5, 1862. 3d Brigade, 3d Division, Third Army Corps, Army of the Potomac Brigadier GeneralNov., 1862, to Jan., 1863. 3d Brigade, 1st Division, Third Army Corps, Army of the Potomac Brigadier GeneralSept. 1862, to Oct., 1862. 3d Brigade, 1st Division, Third Army Corps, Army of the Potoma
William Blaisdell Col. 11th Mass. InfantryDec., 1864, to March 24, 1864. 1st Brigade, 2d Division, Third Army Corps, Army of the Potomac Col. 11th Mass. InfantryJan. 12, 1863, to Feb. 8, 1863. 1st Brigade, 2d Division, Third Army Corps, Army of the Potomac Col. 11th Mass. InfantryJune 20, 1864, to June 22, 1864. 4th Brigade, 2nd Division, Second Army Corps, Army of the Potomac Col. 11th Mass. InfantryMay 3, 1863, to May 23, 1863. 1st Brigade, 2d Division, Third Army Corps, Army of the Potom
H. W. Brown Col. 3d N. J. InfantryApr. 10, 1863, to May 3, 1863. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, Sixth Army Corps, Army of the Potomac Col. 3d N. J. InfantryDec. 24, 1862, to Feb. 8, 1863. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, Sixth Army Corps, Army of the Potomac Col. 3d N. J. InfantryMarch 25, 1864, to May 9, 1864. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, Sixth Army Corps, Army of the Potoma
J. B. Carr Brigadier GeneralAug. 3, 1864, to Sept. 3, 1864. 1st Division, Eighteenth Army Corps, Army of the James Brigadier GeneralFeb. 8, 1863, to May 3, 1863. 1st Brigade, 2d Division, Third Army Corps, Army of the Potomac Brigadier GeneralJan. 12, 1863, to Feb. 8, 1863. 2d Division, Third Army Corps, Army of the Potomac Brigadier GeneralJuly 29, 1864, to Aug. 3, 1864. 3d Division, Eighteenth Army Corps, Army of the James Brigadier GeneralJuly 9, 1863, to July 10, 1863. 2d DivisiFeb. 8, 1863. 2d Division, Third Army Corps, Army of the Potomac Brigadier GeneralJuly 29, 1864, to Aug. 3, 1864. 3d Division, Eighteenth Army Corps, Army of the James Brigadier GeneralJuly 9, 1863, to July 10, 1863. 2d Division, Third Army Corps, Army of the Potomac Brigadier GeneralMarch 25, 1864, to May 2, 1864. 4th Division, Second Army Corps, Army of the Potomac Brigadier GeneralMay 23, 1863, to Oct. 5, 1863. 1st Brigade, 2d Division, Third Army Corps, Army of the Potomac Brigadier GeneralMay 3, 1863, to May 23, 1863. 2d Division, Third Army Corps, Army of the Potomac Brigadier GeneralOct. 5, 1863, to March 24, 1864. 3d Division, Third Army Corps, Army of the Potomac Brigadier GeneralSept. 16, 1863, to
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