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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 11 11 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 5 5 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 4 4 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 2 2 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 13, 1865., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 1 1 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4. You can also browse the collection for February 14th, 1863 AD or search for February 14th, 1863 AD in all documents.

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 48: Seward.—emancipation.—peace with France.—letters of marque and reprisal.—foreign mediation.—action on certain military appointments.—personal relations with foreigners at Washington.—letters to Bright, Cobden, and the Duchess of Argyll.—English opinion on the Civil War.—Earl Russell and Gladstone.—foreign relations.—1862-1863. (search)
aw in it a mode of enlisting private enterprise in aid of the government, calling privateers the militia of the seas; and he was supported in debate by McDougall and Collamer. Sumner thought the measure of evil import from the beginning. As soon as the bill came to light he sought Lieber's views, saying, I wish to do what is best for the country and civilization. Lieber's opinion was rather in favor of the measure. In the debate he contested the measure earnestly and pertinaciously. Feb. 14 and 17, 1863. Works, vol. VII. pp. 278-300. He opposed this resort to licensed rovers seeking prey, as an expedient once prevailing in maritime wars, but now discountenanced by the highest authorities and rejected by civilization; as demoralizing to the parties engaged in it, who were stimulated by booty; as a two-edged sword, likely to be turned against us hereafter; as uncalled for by any exigency, the rebels having no commerce to reward privateers. But the objection which, in view of
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 50: last months of the Civil War.—Chase and Taney, chief-justices.—the first colored attorney in the supreme court —reciprocity with Canada.—the New Jersey monopoly.— retaliation in war.—reconstruction.—debate on Louisiana.—Lincoln and Sumner.—visit to Richmond.—the president's death by assassination.—Sumner's eulogy upon him. —President Johnson; his method of reconstruction.—Sumner's protests against race distinctions.—death of friends. —French visitors and correspondents.—1864-1865. (search)
. p. 269. Sumner attacked at different sessions the worst monopoly ever known in the country, which long resisted the spirit of the ageā€”the pretension of the State of New Jersey to levy exceptional tolls on passengers and freight passing through it, between New York and Philadelphia, which were not levied on passengers and freight passing from point to point within the State, June 9 and Dec. 5, 1862, Works, vol. VII. p. 121; Dec. 22, 1863, Congressional Globe, p. 76; April 25, 1864, Feb. 14, 18, 23, 24, and March 3, 1865, Globe, pp. 790. 889, 1008, 1009, 1059, 1064, 1339; May 29, 1866, Globe, p. 2870; Works, vol. IX. pp. 237-265; vol. x. pp. 469-471. Its legislature also invested one corporation with the exclusive power of maintaining a railway within the State between those two cities. This corporation pushed its pretension to the extent of denying the right of the United States to transport between those cities soldiers and military stores over other railways. The monopo