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Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 11: Chancellorsville. (search)
of the Rappahannock before delivering a general battle, the army has given renewed evidence of its confidence in itself and its fidelity to the principles it represents. That the Army of the Potomac was profoundly loyal, and confident of its strength, and would give or decline battle when its interests or its honor might demand. The events of last week, said he, might well swell with pride the heart of every officer and soldier of this army. And then in a letter to Mr. Lincoln, dated May 13th, 1863, Hooker says: Is it asking too much to inquire your opinion of my Order No. 49? If so, do not answer me. Jackson is dead, and Lee beats McClellan with his untruthful bulletins. It is not known whether Mr. Lincoln ever answered this question. The truth is, the Army of the Potomac was woefully mismanaged. Its commander guided it into the mazes of the Wilderness and got it so mixed and tangled that no chance was afforded for a display of its mettle. General Paxton was killed while lead
with the army of Northern Virginia; from which I inferred he was very averse to leaving Virginia. When the events occurred that have been narrated, General Pemberton had felt severely the need of cavalry for observation and to keep open communications with our troops in Mississippi. As soon as General Johnston assumed command in person, General Pemberton renewed his strenuous efforts to procure it from him, hoping to check the invading army. General Johnston arrived at Jackson on May 13, 1863, and telegraphed to James A. Seddon, Secretary of War, as follows: I arrived this evening, finding the enemy in force between this place and General Pemberton, cutting off communication. I am too late. In the order assigning General Johnston to the Geographical Department of the West, he was directed to repair in person to any part of his command, whenever his presence might be deemed for the time necessary or desirable. On May 9, 1863, General Johnston was ordered to pro
Richmond, May 13, 1863. The Quebec Journal says that news had reached that city that fifteen regiments had been ordered from England to Canada, in consequence of the American (Yankee) Ambassador having notified the British government that, in case the iron-clad steamers now building for the Emperor of China, should be allowed to depart, it will be considered an equivalent to a declaration of war against the United States. The Canadian journals also say that nine vessels had left England for Canada with arms, ammunition, and military stores, six of them being bound to Quebec, and three to Montreal.--Charleston Mercury.
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 22: the siege of Vicksburg. (search)
fierce encounter. The Eighth Missouri (Union) and Tenth Tennessee (Confederate), both Irish regiments, here met, and, the correspondent of the Cincinnati Commercial said, exchanged compliments with genuine Hibernian accent. and found there Jackson newspapers of the day before, announcing, in grandiloquent style, that the Yankees had been whipped at Grand Gulf and Port Gibson, and were falling back to seek the protection of their gun-boats. Correspondent of the Cincinnati Commercial, May 13, 1863. During the engagement McPherson and Logan were seen riding along the lines directing the battle, and exposed to death every moment. This conduct greatly inspirited their troops. McClernand and Sherman had skirmished pretty heavily while McPherson was struggling at Raymond, and when the result of that struggle was known to Grant, he ordered the other corps to move toward Jackson. He had learned that General Joseph E. Johnston, the ablest of the Confederate leaders, was hourly expecte
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Letters. (search)
tment of Mississippi until General Buford receives General Pemberton's orders. Do it at Atlanta, as well as Chattanooga. J. E. Johnston, General. Jackson, May 13, 1863. Hon. J. A. Seddon, Richmond: I arrived this evening, finding the enemy in force between this place and General Pemberton, cutting off the communication. I am too late. J. E. Johnston, General. Jackson, May 13, 1863. Lieutenant-General Pemberton: I have lately arrived, and learn that Major-General Sherman is between us, with four divisions, at Clinton. It is important to reestablish communication that you may be reenforced. If practicable, come up on his rear at once. To to see how feasible was such a movement. I have already given in the body of this report the two letters of instruction from General Johnston, dated respectively 13th and 15th of May, 1863. In obedience to the injunctions contained in the former, which was received on the morning of the 14th, I lost no time in putting my army i
Doc. 190.-the battle at Raymond, Miss. Cincinnati commercial account. Raymond, Miss., May 13, 1863. the battle fought yesterday within three miles of the town of Raymond, Mississippi, ought to be called the battle of Farnden's Creek, from the stream near which it commenced, and whose banks last evening bore witness to the dreadful struggle, by the number of dead and wounded that lay strewn along them. As a battle, the engagement of yesterday is, of course, not entitled to rank with such bloody contests as Shiloh and Donelson, but many who participated in it, and some who witnessed it, agree in pronouncing it, what an officer called it this morning, one of the heaviest small battles of the war. I was attempting to narrate the leading events of the day this morning, but had made only a very little progress when the special messenger, on whom I relied for the transmission of my letter to Milliken's Bend, compelled me to close, as he was about to start for the river, and
e; corporal B. P. Pryor; privates B. F. Norris, G. W. Rape, J. M. Lindsay, and John H. Lewis. Company K, Twenty-seventh Georgia regiment.--Private William Connell. Report of Brigadier-General Iverson. headquarters Iverson's brigade, May 13, 1863. Captain G. Peyton, A. A. G.: Having rested on our arms on the extreme left of the third line of battle, composed of the troops of Rodes's division, during the night of May second, about six o'clock A. M., of May third, we advanced with the of regiments, giving more particular details which are interesting. Very respectfully, Carnot Posey, Brigadier-General, commanding. Report of Brig.-General A. B. Wright. headquarters Wright's brigade, camp near Guineas's Station, May 13, 1863. To Major Thomas S. Mills, A. A. G., Anderson's Division: Major: I herewith enclose a report of the part taken by my brigade in the recent engagements near Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, together with a correct list of casualties sust
y knowledge of the circumstances surrounding me, I thought offered a possibility of success. Had I moved directly to Clinton the enemy would not have given me battle in front, but would have interposed a force greater than my own between me and Vicksburg. It is only necessary to refer to the maps accompanying this report to see how feasible was such a movement. I have already given, in the body of this report, the two letters of instructions from General Johnston, dated respectively the thirteenth and fifteenth of May, 1863. In obedience to the injunctions contained in the former, which was received on the morning of the fourteenth, I lost no time in putting my army in motion in the direction already stated, and for the reasons given. About seven A. M., on the sixteenth, I received the latter, which reiterated the previous instructions. I had in no measure changed my views as to the propriety of the movement therein indicated, but I no longer felt at liberty to deviate from Gener
nteers entered the war as the Westchester Chasseurs. It was organized at New York City and mustered in for two years, Colonel H. Seymour Lansing in command. The regiment left for Washington June 21, 1861, and was stationed near Miner's Hill, just across the District of Columbia line, a mile and a half from Falls Church. It fought on the Peninsula, at the second Bull Run, at Antietam, Fredericksburg, and Chancellorsville, and took part in the famous mud march January 20 to 24, 1863. On May 13, 1863, the three-years men were detached and assigned to a battalion of New York volunteers, and on June 23, 1863, were transferred to the 146th New York Infantry. The regiment was mustered out June 2, 1863, having lost during service five officers and thirty-two enlisted men killed and mortally wounded, and three officers and thirty-seven enlisted men by disease. A dress parade of the seventeenth New York in 1861 The seventeenth New York at Miner's hill, near Washington Father Scu
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 12.89 (search)
bank of the Rappahannock, before delivering a general battle to our adversaries, the army has given renewed evidence of its confidence in itself and its fidelity to the principles it represents. * * * Profoundly loyal and conscious of its strength, the army of the Potomac will give or decline battle whenever its interests or honor may demand. * * * The events of the last week may swell with pride the heart of every officer and soldier of this army. And then in a letter to Lincoln, dated May 13th, 1863, Hooker says, near its close, Is it asking too much to inquire your opinion of my Order No. 49? If so, do not answer me. Jackson is dead and Lee beats McClellan in his untruthful bulletins. I cannot find that Lincoln ever answered this question. Aye, my comrades, the battle of Chancellorsville is over. When written history shall truly record the struggle which ended thus, every leaf may be dripping with the tears of grief and woe, but not a page will be stained with a stigma of sha
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