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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 16 16 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 11 11 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 10 10 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 10 10 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 8 8 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 6 6 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 6 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 5 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 4 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 3 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Lt.-Colonel Arthur J. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States. You can also browse the collection for June 9th, 1863 AD or search for June 9th, 1863 AD in all documents.

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Lt.-Colonel Arthur J. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States, June, 1863. (search)
stop the flames abortive. The deserted state of the wharves is melancholy — the huge placards announcing lines of steamers to New York, New Orleans, and to different parts of the world, still remain, and give one an idea of what a busy scene they used to be. The people, however, all seem happy, contented, and determined. Both the great hotels are crowded; and well dressed, handsome ladies are plentiful; the fare is good, and the charge at the Charleston hotel is eight dollars a day. 9th June, 1863 (Tuesday). A Captain Feilden came to call upon me at 9 A. M. He is an Englishman, and formerly served in the 42d Highlanders. He is now in the Confederate army, and is on the staff of General Beauregard's army. I remember his brother quite well at Sandhurst. Captain Feilden accompanied me to General Ripley's office, and at 12 o'clock the latter officer took us in his boat to inspect Fort Sumter. Our party consisted of an invalid General Davis, a Congressman named Nutt, Captain Fei