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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 17 17 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 11 11 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 10 10 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 6 6 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 5 5 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 4 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 3 3 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 3 3 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 2 2 Browse Search
John D. Billings, The history of the Tenth Massachusetts battery of light artillery in the war of the rebellion 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Lt.-Colonel Arthur J. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States. You can also browse the collection for June 24th, 1863 AD or search for June 24th, 1863 AD in all documents.

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Lt.-Colonel Arthur J. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States, June, 1863. (search)
army. At no period of the war, they say, have the men been so well equipped, so well clothed, so eager for a fight, or so confident of success — a very different state of affairs from that which characterized the Maryland invasion of last year, when half of the army were barefooted stragglers, and many of the remainder unwilling and reluctant to cross the Potomac. Miss-- told me to-day that dancing and horseracing are forbidden by the Episcopal Church in this part of Virginia. 24th June, 1863 (Wednesday). Lawley being in weak health, we determined to spend another day with our kind friends in Winchester. I took the horses out again for six hours to graze, and made acquaintance with two Irishmen, who gave me some cut grass and salt for the horses. One of these men had served and had been wounded in the Southern army. I remarked to him that he must have killed lots of his own countrymen; to which he replied, Oh yes, but faix they must all take it as it comes. I have alw