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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Kansas Volunteers. (search)
as a Battalion of 4 Companies for escort to General Blunt. Regiment organized at Fort Scott, December, 1863. Attached to District of the Frontier, Dept. of Missouri, April, 1863, to January, 1864. Unattached, District Frontier, 7th Corps, Dept. Arkansas, to March, 1864. 3rd Brigade, Frontier Division, 7th Corps, to January, 1865. 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division, 7th Corps, to February, 1865. Unattached, 7th Corps, Pine Bluff, Ark., to June, 1863. Service. Cabin Creek, C. N., July 1-2, 1863 (Co. B ). Operations against Quantrell in Kansas August 20-28. Massacre at Lawrence August 21 (Detachment). Operations in Cherokee Nation September 11-25. Waldron September 11. Baxter Springs October 6 (Co. B ). Regiment moved to Fort Smith, Ark., November 20-December 3. Duty there scouting and foraging till February 23, 1864. Expedition into Choctaw County February 1-21. Moved to Ozark February 26-28, and duty there till April 6. Flint Creek March 6.
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Massachusetts Volunteers. (search)
son, Barnard, Craig and Tillinghast till August 23, 1862. Moved to Cloud's Mills August 23. March to Manassas, Va., August 26-30. Return to Washington and garrison Forts Albany, Craig, Tillinghast, Woodbury and DeKalb, Defenses South of the Potomac till May, 1864. (Cos. H and I detached September 27, 1862, and moved to Harper's Ferry, W. Va. Co. C ordered to Harper's Ferry October 27, 1862. Co. B ordered to Harper's Ferry, W. Va., December 23, 1862; garrison duty there till July 1, 1863. Co. I moved to Winchester June 10, 1863, and participated in the Battle of Winchester June 13-15, and retreat to Harper's Ferry. Defence of Harper's Ferry June 16-July 1. Evacuation of Harper's Ferry and march to Frederick, Md., July 1-2. Duty with Artillery Reserve, Army of the Potomac, to July 11-22. Moved to Harper's Ferry July 22 and duty there till December 1, when ordered to Washington and rejoin Regiment.) Regiment moved to join Army of the Potomac at Belle Plain, V
Participating in skirmish at Bloomery Gap, Va., February 4, 1862. Advance on Winchester March 7-15. Battle of Winchester March 23. Occupation of Mount Jackson April 17. Battle of Cedar Mountain August 9. Pope's Campaign in Northern Virginia August 16-September 2. Catlett's Station August 22. Centreville August 27-28. Groveton August 29. Bull Run August 30. Chantilly September 1. Duty in Defenses of Washington till June, 1863. Battle of Gettysburg, Pa., July 1-3, 1863. Monterey Gap July 4. Emmettsburg July 5. Hagerstown July 6-12. Falling Waters July 14. Hartwood Church August 28. Advance from the Rappahannock to the Rapidan September 13-17. Bristoe Campaign October 9-22. Hartwood Church November 5. Mine Run Campaign November 26-December 2. In Defenses of Washington, D. C., till January, 1864, when rejoined Regiment. Regiment lost during service 6 Officers and 45 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 3 Offic
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Pennsylvania Volunteers. (search)
mpanies A and B duty at Fort Delaware till December, 1862. Transferred to 3rd Pennsylvania Heavy Artillery February 17, 1863, as Companies A, B, G, H, K and L (which see). Commonwealth Independent Company Heavy Artillery Organized at Philadelphia April 24, 1861. Duty at Fort Delaware. Mustered out August 5, 1861. Ermentrout's Company Militia Heavy Artillery Organized at Reading July 3, 1863. Mustered out August 26, 1863. Guss' Battery Militia Light Artillery Organized at West Chester July 1, 1863. Mustered out August 24, 1863. Jones' Independent Company Heavy Artillery Schooley's Independent Company Heavy Artillery Tyler's Independent Battery Heavy Artillery Organized at Pittsburg June 16, 1863. On duty at Harper's Ferry and other points in the Department of West Virginia. Mustered out January 28, 1864. Woodward's Independent Company Heavy Artillery Organized at Philadelphia July 9, 1863. Mustered out February 1, 1864.
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Pennsylvania Volunteers. (search)
giment Militia Infantry. Organized at Reading July 1, 1863, for the protection of Pennsylvania during Lee'sent Militia Infantry. Organized at Harrisburg July 1, 1863, for the protection of Pennsylvania during Lee'sent Militia Infantry. Organized at Harrisburg July 1, 1863, for the protection of Pennsylvania during Lee'sent Militia Infantry. Organized at Huntingdon July 1, 1863, for the protection of Pennsylvania during Lee'sent Militia Infantry. Organized at Harrisburg July 1, 1863, for the protection of Pennsylvania during Lee'sment Militia Infantry. Organized at Pittsburg July 1, 1863. Duty in Pennsylvania during Lee's invasion at Militia Infantry. Organized at Philadelphia July 1, 1863. Duty in Pennsylvania during Lee's invasion aompany Militia Infantry. Organized at Altoona July 1, 1863. Mustered out August, 1863. Luther's Indepy Militia Infantry. Organized at West Chester July 1, 1863. Mustered out July 8, 1863. Spear's Indepe
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, United States Veteran Reserve Corps. (search)
May 20, 1864. Consolidated with 14th Company, 2nd Battalion, August 7, 1865. 2nd United States Veteran Reserve Company, 2nd Battalion Formerly known as Company G, 11th Regiment, Veteran Reserve Corps. Organized at Washington, D. C., July 1, 1863. Designation changed to 2nd Company, 2nd Battalion, April 25, 1864. Mustered out by detachments July 19-November 21, 1865. 3rd United States Veteran Reserve Company, 2nd Battalion Formerly known as Company H, 11th Regiment, Veteran Reserve Corps. Organized at Washington, D. C., July 1, 1863. Designation changed to 3rd Company, 2nd Battalion, April 25, 1864. Consolidated with 16th Company, 2nd Battalion, September 3, 1865. 4th United States Veteran Reserve Company, 2nd Battalion Formerly known as Company G, 10th Regiment, Veteran Reserve Corps. Designation changed August 1, 1864. Transferred to 5th Independent Company January 4, 1866. 5th United States Veteran Reserve Company, 2nd Battalion Formerl
L. Burt, of Boston, was appointed judgeadvocate-general, Oct. 1, 1862, and was promoted to the rank of brigadier-general, Feb. 9, 1865. Charles Sprague Sargent, of Brookline, was appointed assistant quartermaster-general, with the rank of first lieutenant, Nov. 3, 1862. William Sturgis Hooper, of Boston, was appointed assistant adjutant-general, with the rank of captain, Nov. 19, 1862. Captain Hooper served with this rank at New Orleans as staff officer under General Banks, and died July 1, 1863. The foregoing pages bring the history of Massachusetts in the war to the close of the year 1862, at which time Massachusetts was represented by her brave men in nearly every field of service, and upon the decks of every ship in the American navy. She had given martyrs to the great cause on nearly every battlefield, and in every naval engagement, in the war. Many had died; many had their limbs severed from their bodies; many households had been made desolate; many stood by the buts of
. Some contracts were made by Mr. Forbes in London. Colonel Ritchie, having arranged his business, accepted the appointment in August, and early in September sailed for England to purchase ordnance. His experience abroad, and the success of his mission, forms one of the most interesting episodes in the war history of Massachusetts, as we shall show hereafter, and for the present pass to other matters. In the preceding pages, we have brought the correspondence of the Governor down to July 1, 1863. Not that we have given any thing approaching a full record of it: that would be impossible in a publication like this. We have given only those relating to matters of general interest, which we have abridged from seven volumes, each containing upwards of four hundred letters, and which relate to every conceivable subject connected with the war, and the civil policy of the State. In the Adjutant-General's office, an equal number were written, of which we can refer only to a few, to ill
of the Adjutant-General reports of General William Raymond Lee Colonel Ritchie sent to England Democratic State Convention Republican State Convention re-election of Governor Andrew the President calls for three hundred thousand more Volunteers extra session of the Legislature called Governor's address bounties increased abstract of laws. The preceding chapter brought the record of the State, as it relates to the military correspondence of the Governor and the departments, to July 1, 1863. Before proceeding farther, we propose to briefly sketch the military operations in the several departments from Jan. 1 to July 1, and particularly in regard to the nine months regiments, the services they performed, and their return home at the expiration of their terms of service. General Banks was in command of the Department of the Gulf; General Hooker, of the Army of the Potomac; and General Foster, of North Carolina. All of the nine months regiments, except the Sixth, were in the
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 31: after the battle. (search)
must here say, in justice to the citizens, that they manifested a spirit unexpected and worthy of the name of the town—something that we had been unaccustomed to in our previous experience with the population of Maryland. It so happened that our marching rations were exhausted, and our teams behind. The citizens gave my men supper in their houses, and breakfast in the morning, refusing pay from any enlisted man, and making very moderate charges to the officers. This was the morning of July 1st, 1863. Early we commenced to distribute rations, but had scarcely begun when sudden orders to move set us on the march and my men had to leave with empty haversacks. We marched all that day until after nightfall, the moon shining with extreme brightness, and we were placed in line of battle in rear of Round Top, where it was understood we might expect to meet the enemy—the First and Eleventh Corps, under Reynolds and Howard, having met with severe disaster during the day and at and beyond
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