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Lt.-Colonel Arthur J. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 4: The Cavalry (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 11, 1864., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Gettysburg campaign--official reports. (search)
g the operations around Gettysburg were-- Killed,219 Wounded,1,229 Missing,375   Total,1,823 I am, Major, with great respect, your obedient servant, Edward Johnson, Major-General. Report of Major-General H. Heth. headquarters Heth's division, Camp near Orange Courthouse, September 13, 1863. Captain — I have the honor to report the operations of my division from the 29th June until the 1st of July, including the part it took in the battle of Gettysburg--first day--July 1st, 1863. The division reached Cashtown, Pennsylvania, on the 29th of June. Cashtown is situated at the base of the South Mountain, on the direct road from Chambersburg via Fayetteville to Gettysburg, and nine miles from the latter place. On the morning of the 30th of June, I ordered Brigadier-General Pettigrew to take his brigade to Gettysburg, search the town for army supplies, shoes especially, and return the same day. On reaching the suburbs of Gettysburg, General Pettigrew found a lar
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Gettysburg-report of General G. Doles. (search)
Battle of Gettysburg-report of General G. Doles. headquarters Doles' brigade, July 19th, 1863. Major H. A. Whiting, Assistant Adjutant-General: Major — This brigade was formed into line of battle about. one o'clock P. M., July 1st, 1863, in front of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. We occupied the left of Major-General Rodes' division. The enemy's cavalry picket appearing in force on our front and left flank, skirmishers from this command were ordered to dislodge him. After a short engagbrigade, July 9th, 1863. Major — As an appendix to my official report of the battle of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 1st to 4th, 1863, I respectfully submit the following: While my command was advancing against the enemy on the evening of July 1st, 1863, my line was subjected to and did receive a severe fire from one of our own batteries, from which fire I lost several men killed and wounded. This was from a two-gun battery (brass pieces), stationed on the side of the hill where General Rod
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Gettysburg. (search)
nt bearing I cannot too highly make mention. I am, Captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant, George H. Steuart, Brigadier-General Commanding. Report of General Alfred Iverson. camp near Darkesville, July 17, 1863. Major H. A. Whiting, Assistant Adjutant-General: I have the honor to report that upon arriving in the vicinity of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, where a fight was progressing between the corps of Lieutenant-General A. P. Hill and the enemy on the morning of July 1st, 1863, my brigade, being in the advance of Major-General R. E. Rodes' division, was ordered by him to form line of battle and advance towards the firing at Gettysburg. This advance brought my brigade across a wooded height over-looking the plain and the town of Gettysburg. General Rodes here took upon himself the direction of the brigade and moved it by the right flank, changing at the same time the direction of the line of battle. Masses of the enemy being observed on the plain in front,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Gettysburg campaign--report of Brigadier-General Harry T. Hays. (search)
The Gettysburg campaign--report of Brigadier-General Harry T. Hays. headquarters Hays' brigade, August 3d, 1863. Major John W. Daniel, Assistant Adjutant-General, Early's Division: Major — I respectfully submit the following report of the operations of the troops under my command near the city of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. On Wednesday, July 1, 1863, after a march of twelve or fourteen miles returning from the city of York, I arrived with my brigade on the Heidlersburg road, within a mile and a half of Gettysburg. At this point I discovered that a space in the division line of battle had been left for my command, which had been marching in the rear of the column; Brigadier-General Gordon having deployed to the right; Brigadier-General Hoke's brigade, commanded by Colonel Avery, and Smith's brigade to the left. I formed my line of battle, extending across the road, placing the Fifth, Sixth and right wing of the Ninth regiments on the right of the road, the left wing of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Gettysburg. (search)
ou copies of the reports of officers commanding the different regiments composing this brigade. I have the honor to be, Very respectfully, your obedient servant, A. R. Wright, Brigadier-General Commanding Brigade. Report of Brigadier-General Joseph R. Davis. headquarters Davis' brigade, August 26th, 1863. Major R. H. Finney, Assistant Adjutant-General: Major — I have the honor to submit the following report to you of the part taken by my brigade in the battle of the 1st of July, 1863, at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. Early on the morning of the 1st I moved in rear of Archer's brigade, with three regiments of my command (the Eleventh Mississippi being left as a guard for the division wagon train) from camp on the heights near Cashtown, by a turnpike road leading to Gettysburg. When within about two miles from town our artillery was put in position and opened fire. I was ordered to take position on the left of the turnpike, and, with the right resting on it, press fo
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Extract from report of Colonel Baldwin, Chief of ordnance A. N. V. (search)
Extract from report of Colonel Baldwin, Chief of ordnance A. N. V. Captured and brought off from the field at Gettysburg in the actions of July 1st and 2d, 1863, seven pieces of artillery. Left near the battle-field, one 12-pound howitzer and carriage, which was afterwards secured and brought off in a wagon of the reserve ordnance train, the carriage having been destroyed on the field. Abandoned on the road near Fairfield, one 12-pound howitzer and carriage and one 6-pound bronze gun and carriage, which were afterwards secured and brought off in wagons, the carriages having been destroyed. Number of pieces artillery actually gained, seven. Two pieces and carriages lost at Falling Waters not reported to me. Briscoe G. Baldwin, Lieutenant Colonel and Chief of Ordnance A. N. V. Ordnance Office, A. N. V., January 19, 1864.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Gettysburg campaign-operations of the Artillery. (search)
nd Acting Chief Artillery Second Corps. Report of Lieutenant-Colonel William Nelson. Headquarters Artillery battalion, August 4, 1863. Colonel J. Thompson Brown, Acting Chief Artillery, Second Corps: Colonel,--In accordance with orders just received, I have the honor to make the following report of the operations of the respective batteries of my command in the battle of Gettysburg and all engagements since that time. I reached Gettysburg with my command Wednesday evening, July 1st, 1863, and received orders to report to Major-General Rodes, who ordered me to report to Lieutenant-Colonel Carter, commanding artillery of his division. Having done so, I was ordered early on Thursday morning to keep my guns in readiness for action immediately in rear of heights over-looking the town, and about one-fourth of a mile to the left of the Cashtown turnpike. About 11 o'clock, A. M., I was ordered to bring my battalion to a point immediately in rear of the Gettysburg College, pa
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Campaigns of the civil war — ChancellorsvilleGettysburg. (search)
0 or 63,000 men and 190 guns, the 80,000 or 82,000 men and 300 guns with which Meade encountered him at Gettysburg. General Doubleday has evidently counted Stuart's cavalry twice in the above statement, while he has counted Pleasanton's cavalry but once. But why at this day should General Doubleday resort to the complicated calculations by which the Count of Paris, several years ago, and in the absence of the official returns, attempted to arrive at the numbers of the Federal army on July 1st, 1863? General Meade's official return for June 30th, the day before the battle of Gettysburg began, has been more than once published. It is given in the article of General Early, which follows in the Southern Historical papers the very letter from which General Doubleday quotes, and of course it settles the question as to Meade's numbers. It gives the present for duty in the Federal infantry and artillery at that date as 89,283, and gives the strength of the cavalry as taken from the retur
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Battles. (search)
hickasaw Bayou (Miss.)Dec. 27-29, 1862 Stone River (Murfreesboro, Tenn.)Dec. 31, 1862 and Jan. 3, 1863 Arkansas Post (Ark.)Jan. 11, 1863 Grierson's RaidApril 11 to May 5, 1863 Port Gibson (Miss.)May 1, 1863 Chancellorsville (Va.)May 1-4, 1863 Raymond (Miss.)May 12, 1863 Jackson (Miss.)May 14, 1863 Champion Hill (Miss.)May 16, 1863 Big Black River (Miss.)May 17, 1863 Vicksburg (Miss.)May 19-22, 1863 Port Hudson (La.)May 27, 1863 Hanover Junction (Pa.)June 30, 1863 Gettysburg (Pa.)July 1-3, 1863 Vicksburg (Surrendered)July 4, 1863 Helena (Ark.)July 4, 1863 Port Hudson (Surrendered)July 9, 1863 Jackson (Miss.)July 16, 1863 Fort Wagner (S. C.)July 10-18, 1863 Morgan's Great Raid (Ind. and O.)June 24 to July 26, 1863 ChickamaugaSept. 19 and 20, Campbell's Station (Tenn.)Nov. 16, 1863 Knoxville (Tenn.; Besieged)Nov. 17 to Dec. 4, 1863 Lookout Mountain (Tenn.)Nov. 24, 1863 Missionary Ridge (Tenn.)Nov. 25, 1863 Olustee (Fla.)Feb. 20, 1864 Sabine Cross Roads (La.)Apri
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Lee, Robert Edward 1807- (search)
under Rosecrans, assisted by Generals Cox, Schenck, and Benham. The belligerents remained in sight of each other for about three weeks. Wise, then under Lee's command, was recalled to Richmond. Lee's campaign in western Virginia was regarded by the Confederate government as a failure, and he, too, was soon afterwards recalled and sent to South Carolina, where he planned and partially constructed the coast defensive works. See Charleston. After his disastrous experience at Gettysburg (July 1, 2, and 3, 1863), General Lee began a retreat for Virginia on the night of the 5th, having previously sent forward his enormous wagon-trains and sick and wounded men. Sedgwick's corps and Kilpatrick's cavalry were sent in pursuit. Sedgwick overtook the Confederate rear-guard at a pass in the South Mountain range, but was recalled, and the whole army, having rested, were put in motion for a flank movement through the lower passes of South Mountain. But the movement was so tardy that when Me
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