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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 253 253 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 44 44 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 27 27 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 26 26 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 22 22 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 16 16 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 14 14 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 13 13 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 10 10 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 8 8 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3.. You can also browse the collection for July 3rd, 1863 AD or search for July 3rd, 1863 AD in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The great charge and artillery fighting at Gettysburg. (search)
fired by the Washington Artillery. In the United service magazine for August, 1885, Lieutenant-Colonel William Miller Owen, of the Washington Artillery, says: Returning to the position of the Washington Artillery, we all quietly awaited the order to open the ball. At 1:30 P. M. a courier dashed up in great haste, holding a little slip of paper, torn evidently from a memorandum-book, on which, written in pencil and addressed to Colonel Walton, was the following: headquarters, July 3d, 1863. Colonel: Let the batteries open. Order great care and precision in firing. If the batteries at the Peach Orchard cannot be used against the point we intend attacking, let them open on the enemy on the rocky hill. Most respectfully, J. Longstreet, Lieutenant-General Commanding. The order to fire the signal-gun was immediately communicated to Major Eshleman, commanding the Washington Artillery, and the report of the first gun rang out upon the still summer air. There was a momen
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 4.53 (search)
l's line. It needs but a moment's examination of the official map to see that our troops on the left were locked up. As to the center, Pickett's and Pettigrew's assaulting divisions had formed no part of A. P. Hill's line, which was virtually intact. The idea that there must have been a gap of at least a mile in that line, made by throwing forward these divisions, and that a prompt advance Colonel Eliakim Sherrill, commanding the Third Brigade of Hays's division, Second Corps. Killed July 3, 1863. from a photograph. from Cemetery Ridge would have given us the line, or the artillery in front of it, was a delusion. A prompt counter-charge after a combat between two small bodies of men is one thing; the change from the defensive to the offensive of an army, after an engagement at a single point, is quite another. This was not a Waterloo defeat with a fresh army to follow it up, and to have made such a change to the offensive, on the assumption that Lee had made no provision again
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., General Hancock and the artillery at Gettysburg. (search)
en how demoralizing it is to endure artillery fire without reply. Now, on the question thus raised, who was the better judge, General Hunt or General Hancock? Had Henry J. Hunt taken command of a brigade of infantry in 1861, had he for nearly two years lived with the infantry, marching with them, camping among them, commanding them in numerous actions, keeping close watch of their temper and spirit, observing their behavior under varying conditions and trials, I believe that by the 3d of July, 1863, he would have become one of the most capable and judicious corps commanders of the army. But in so doing he would necessarily have forfeited nearly all of that special experience which combined with his high intelligence and great spirit to make him one of the best artillerists whom the history of war has known. Certainly a service almost wholly in the artillery could not yield that intimate knowledge of the temper of troops which should qualify him, equally with Hancock, to judge wh
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces at Gettysburg, Pa., July 1st-3d, 1863. (search)
The opposing forces at Gettysburg, Pa., July 1st-3d, 1863. The composition, losses, and strength of each army as here stated give the gist of all the data obtainable in the Official Records. K stands for killed; w for wounded; m w for mortally wounded; m for captured or missing; c for captured. The Union army. Army of the Potomac--Major-General George G. Meade. Staff loss: w, 4. Command of the Provost Marshal General, Brig.-Gen. Marsena R. Patrick: 93d N. Y., At Taneytown and not engaged in the battle. Lieut.-Col. Benjamin C. Butler; 8th U. S., At Taneytown and not engaged in the battle. Capt. Edwin W. H. Read: 2d Pa. Cav., Col. R. Butler Price; E and I, 6th Pa. Cav., Capt. James Starr; Detachments 1st, 2d, 5th and 6th, U. S, Cav. Guards and Orderlies: Oneida (N. Y.) Cav., Capt. Daniel P. Mann. Artillery, See artillery brigades attached to army corps and the reserve. Brig.-Gen. Henry J. Hunt. U. S. Engineer Battalion, Capt. George H. Mendell. First Army
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 5.69 (search)
while Bowen suggested that the Confederate army should be allowed to march out, with the honors of war, carrying their small-arms and field-artillery. This was promptly and unceremoniously rejected. The interview here ended, I agreeing, however, to send a letter giving final terms by 10 o'clock that night. I had sent word to Admiral Porter soon after the correspondence with Pemberton had commenced, so that hostilities might be stopped on First conference between Grant and Pemberton, July 3, 1863. from a sketch made at the time. Grant and Pemberton met near the tree and went aside to the earth-work, where they sat in conference. To their right is a group of four, including General John S. Bowen, C. S. A., General A. J. Smith, General James B. McPherson, and Colonel L. M. Montgomery. Under the tree are Chief-of-Staff John A. Rawlins, Assistant Secretary of War Charles A. Dana, and Theodore R. Davis, special artist, who made the above and many other sketches of the Vicksburg s
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The terms of surrender. (search)
--editors. Philadelphia, June 12, 1875. Dear Sir — I give you with pleasure my version of the interview between General Grant and myself on the afternoon of July 3, 1863, in front of the Confederate lines at Vicksburg. If you will refer to the first volume of Badeau's life of U. S. Grant, you will find a marked discrepancy bo the council and approved, was sent to General Grant under a flag of truce by the hands of Major-General J. S. Bowen, on the morning of the 3d: Vicksburg, July 3d, 1863. Major-General Grant, Commanding United States Forces near Vicksburg, Mississippi. General: I have the honor to propose to you an armistice of------hours, wit Pemberton, Lieutenant-General Commanding. In due time the following reply was handed to me: headquarters, Department of the Tennessee, near Vicksburg, July 3d, 1863. Lieutenant-General John C. Pemberton, Commanding Confederate Forces, etc. General: Your note of this date is just received, proposing an armistice for several