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Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 39 39 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 32 32 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 24 24 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 21 21 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 20 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 14 14 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 13 13 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 13 13 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 10 10 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 10 10 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for July 4th, 1863 AD or search for July 4th, 1863 AD in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Prison life at Fort McHenry. (search)
Prison life at Fort McHenry. By Rev. Dr. T. D. Witherspoon, late Chaplain of the Forty-Second Mississippi Regiment. Paper no. 1. On the evening of the 4th of July, 1863, when it became apparent that the army of General Lee was in quiet and undisturbed retreat from its position before Gettysburg, I found myself in the midst of three or four hundred men of the brigade in which I served, who were too severely wounded to be transported to the rear. Two alternatives presented themselves, to leave these men in the hour of their distress, or to remain within the enemy's line. The decision was soon made; and the consent of superior officers having been obtained, I stood by the roadway waving adieu as the little remnant of the gallant brigade tramped silently and sorrowfully by; and then turned to the tenderest and saddest ministry of my life, as under open flies, on the bare ground, or a mere pile of straw, these gallant men lay heroically suffering or unconsciously moaning their li