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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 35 35 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 13 13 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 9 9 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 6 6 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 6 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 5 5 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 4 4 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 4 4 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 3 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 3 Browse Search
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rn, held the surgeons and assistant surgeons and officers of ambulance corps to a strict accountability for a careful performance of their duties, while the latter fortified themselves by judicious oversight of their subordinates, the result was to place this department of the army on a footing which endured, with the most profitable of results to the service, till the close of the war. I vividly remember my first look into one of these field hospitals. It was, I think, on the 27th of November, 1863, during the Mine Run Campaign, so-called. General French, then commanding the Tiird Corps, was fighting the battle of Locust Grove, and General Warren, with the Second Corps, had also been engaged with the enemy, and had driven him from the neighborhood of Robertson's Tavern, in the vicinity of which the terrific Battle of the Wilderness began the following May. Near this tavern the field hospital of Warren's Second Division had been located, and into this I peered while my battery
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Army Life in a Black Regiment, chapter 14 (search)
863. C. W. Hooper, N. Y. Vol. Eng., Feb. 17, 1863; First Lt., April 16, 1863. N. G. Parker, 1st Mass. Cavalry, March, 1863; First Lt., May 5, 1863. A. H. Tirrell, 1st Mass. Cav., March 6, 1863; Resigned, July 22, 1863. A. W. Jackson, 8th Me., March 6, 1863; First Lt., Aug. 26, 1863. Henry A. Beach, 48th N. Y., April 5, 1863; First Lt., April 30, 1864. E. W. Robbins, 8th Me., April 5, 1863; First Lt., April 30, 1864. A. B. Brown, Civil Life, April 17, 1863; Resigned, Nov. 27, 1863. F. M. Gould, 3d R. I. Battery, June 1, 1863; Resigned, June 8, 1864. Asa child, 8th Me., Aug. 7, 1863; First Lt., Sept., 1865. Jerome T. Furman, 52d Pa., Aug. 30, 1863; Killed at Walhalla, S. C., Aug. 26, 1865. John W. Selvage, 48th N. Y., Sept. 10, 1863; First Lt. 36th U. S. C. T., March, 1865. Mirand W. Saxton, Civil Life, Nov. 19, 1863; Captain 128th U. S. C. T., June 25, 1864 [now Second Lt. 38th U. S. Infantry]. Nelson S. White, Dec. 22, 1863; First Lt
te the high-sounding proclamation that heralded its advance. This truth is mournful, yet it is no less a truth. Nor is it possible to review in connection the events of the last of April and first of May on the Rappahannock and on the Nansemond, without reflecting that had both Federal armies been commanded with equal ability, the united results might and could have been one of the most glorious triumphs to our arms that history has yet recorded. The Richmond Examiner of the twenty-seventh November, 1863, has the following in its leading editorial upon Lieutenant-General Longstreet and his Knoxville and Suffolk campaigns, which are pronounced as parallel failures: Perhaps the result might have been different if Longstreet and his corps of the Virginia army had been in line. His operations in East-Tennessee afford little compensation for the reverse at Chattanooga, nor have the late bare and scanty news from that quarter sustained the high hope which the public justly based
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Opposing forces in the Chattanooga campaign. November 23d-27th, 1863. (search)
Opposing forces in the Chattanooga campaign. November 23d-27th, 1863. For much of the information contained in this list and in similar lists to follow, the editors are indebted (in advance of the publication of the Official Records ) to Brigadier-General Richard C. Drum, Adjutant-General of the Army. K stands for killed; w for wounded; m w for mortally wounded; m for captured or missing; c for captured. The Union army: Maj.-Gen. Ulysses S. Grant. army of the Cumberland.--Maj.-Gen. George H. Thomas. General Headquarters: 1st Ohio Sharp-shooters, Capt. G. M. Barber; 10th Ohio, Lieut.-Col. W. M. Ward. Fourth Army Corps, Maj.-Gen. Gordon Granger. First division, Brig.-Gen. Charles Cruft. Escort: E, 92d Ill., Capt. Matthew Van Buskirk. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Walter C. Whitaker: 96th Ill., Col. Thomas E. Champion, Maj. George Hicks; 35th Ind., Col. Bernard F. Mullen; 8th Ky., Col. Sidney M. Barnes; 40th Ohio, Col. Jacob E. Taylor; 51st Ohio, Lieut.-Col. Charles H. W
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Confederate defense of Fort Sumter. (search)
bombardment, until, splintered to a stump, it ceased to be used, and a smaller flag was displayed on the walls. Before that, the large garrison flag had been cut away seven times, and replaced by climbing. This I saw done repeatedly by Private John Drury, and once by Sergeant Schaffer, both of the 1st South Carolina Artillery. Afterward, when the flag was flown from the south-eastern angle, and again from the center of the gorgewall, I witnessed feats of replacing it under fire. November 27th, 1863, the shot-marker at the lookout on the western extremity of the gorge, Private James Tupper, Jr., of the Charleston Battalion, seeing the flag shot away, walked, exposed the whole length of the crest, to the point where he was met by three others of the same command, C. B. Foster, W. C. Buck-heister, and A. J. Bluett, who had clambered up by the ladders. But his comrades were ready, and with their assistance he managed to display the flag in about twelve minutes. They were all expose
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., John Morgan in 1864. (search)
John Morgan in 1864. by Basil W. Duke, Brigadier-General, C. S. A. General John H. Morgan escaped from the prison at Columbus, Ohio, November 27th, 1863, Generals Morgan and Duke and sixty-eight other officers of Morgan's command, captured in Ohio, at the close of July, 1863 [see Vol. III., p. 634], were confined in the State penitentiary at Columbus. On the night of November 27th, Morgan and Captains J. C. Bennett, L. D. Hockersmith, C. S. Magee, Ralph Sheldon, Samuel Taylor, and Thomas H. Hines escaped from their cells, having cut a way through the cell-walls into an air-chamber, and tunneled the outer foundation-walls of the prison at the end of the chamber. The tools used in cutting away the masonry and the earth were two small knives, and the work was accomplished in twenty days, of five hours labor each day. After leaving the prison the party separated. General Morgan and Captain Hines took the cars at Columbus for Cincinnati. At Cincinnati they crossed into Kentuck
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 5: the Chattanooga campaign.--movements of Sherman's and Burnside's forces. (search)
nly. The Thirteenth Illinois made a desperate attempt to dislodge the foe, but failed, with heavy loss. Yet the struggle went on, and finally, in the afternoon, when some of Hooker's guns were brought into position and the post was flanked by his infantry, Cleburne retreated, having inflicted a loss on the Nationals of four hundred and thirty-two men, of whom sixty-five were killed, Cleburne left one hundred and thirty killed and wounded on the field. So ended the battle of Ringgold. Nov. 27, 1863. General J. C. Davis's division, which had been attached to Sherman's command, reached Ringgold just after Cleburne fled, ready to press on in pursuit; but there it ended. Grant would gladly have continued it, and would doubtless have captured or destroyed Bragg's army; but he was compelled to refrain, because Burnside needed immediate relief, so as to save East Tennessee from the grasp of Longstreet. He had informed Grant that his supplies would not last longer than the 3d of Dece
l, Va., July 28, 1864 7 Andersonville Prison 1 Sulphur Springs, Va., Oct. 12, 1863 8 Deep Bottom, Va., Aug. 14, 1864 2 Place unknown 5 Mountain Run, Va., Nov. 27, 1863 10 Vaughn Road, Va., Oct. 1, 1864 4     notes.--Of the 272 cavalry regiments in the Union Army, the First New Jersey stands sixth in point of losses in a 17 killed, 124 wounded, and 12 missing; total, 153. Major Phillip J. Kearney was mortally wounded in this battle. In the action at Locust Grove (Mine Run), November 27, 1863, the regiment lost 6 killed, 20 wounded, and 4 missing. This was the last battle of the Third Corps, for in March, 1864, the War Department issued the foolisfederate prisons (previously included), 76. battles. K. & M. W. battles. K. & M. W. battles. K. & M. W. Hanover Pa., June 30, 1863 1 Morton's Ford, Va., Nov. 27, 1863 2 Luray, Va., Sept. 24, 1864 1 Gettysburg, Pa., July 3, 1863 15 Todd's Tavern, Va., May 6, 1864 5 Woodstock, Va., Oct. 8, 1864 1 Cashtown, Md., July 5, 1
's Seventeenth 20 46 27 93 1st Ohio T. J. Wood's Fourth 11 68 -- 79 6th Indiana T. J. Wood's Fourth 13 63 -- 76 27th Pennsylvania Steinwehr's Eleventh 12 59 13 84 36th Ohio Baird's Fourteenth 10 62 3 75 10th Missouri J. E. Smith's Seventeenth 11 53 -- 64 76th Ohio Osterhaus's Fifteenth 18 43 2 63 5th Kentucky T. J. Wood's Fourth 10 52 -- 62 92d Ohio Baird's Fourteenth 12 46 -- 58 26th Missouri J. E. Smith's Seventeenth 15 34 4 53 Ringgold, Ga.             Nov. 27, 1863.             7th Ohio Geary's Twelfth 16 58 -- 74 28th Pennsylvania Geary's Twelfth 4 30 -- 34 76th Ohio Osterhaus's Fifteenth 18 43 2 63 13th Illinois Osterhaus's Fifteenth 4 58 1 63 4th Iowa Osterhaus's Fifteenth 10 37 2 49 Mine Run, Va.             Nov. 26-28, 1863.             10th Vermont Carr's Third 11 56 2 69 14th New Jersey Carr's Third 14 47 -- 61 151st New York Carr's Third 9 43 1 53 6th Maryland Carr's Third 10 42 -- 52 17t
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington, Chapter 15: Confederate losses — strength of the Confederate Armies--casualties in Confederate regiments — list of Confederate Generals killed — losses in the Confederate Navy. (search)
ll's 10 103 19 132 Bristoe Station, Va.             Oct. 14, 1863.             27th North Carolina Cooke's Heth's 30 174 -- 204 48th North Carolina Cooke's Heth's 8 115 -- 123 15th North Carolina Cooke's Heth's 14 87 -- 101 26th North Carolina Kirkland's Heth's 16 83 -- 99 Wauhatchie, Tenn.             Oct. 27, 1863.             5th South Carolina Bratton's Jenkins's 9 84 9 102 ----Hampton Legion Bratton's Jenkins's 8 65 12 85 Mine Run, Va.             Nov. 27, 1863.             3d North Carolina Steuart's Johnson's 7 65 -- 72 4th Virginia Walker's Johnson's 7 48 4 59 Olustee, Fla.             Feb. 20, 1864.             32d Georgia Harrison's Finnegan's 15 149 -- 164 64th Georgia Harrison's Finnegan's 17 88 2 107 2d Florida Battalion Harrison's Finnegan's 12 95 2 109 There are no muster-out rolls of the Confederate regiments. There are partial sets of muster-rolls and monthly retur
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