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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 508 508 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 23 23 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 18 18 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 17 17 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 14 14 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 12 12 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 8 8 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 7 7 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6 6 Browse Search
L. P. Brockett, Women's work in the civil war: a record of heroism, patriotism and patience 6 6 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The treatment of prisoners during the war between the States. (search)
Union prisoners, while a large number of the Confederates would have remained in prison, awaiting the chances of the capture of their equivalents. Ii. In January, 1864, and, indeed, some time earlier, it became very manifest that in consequence of the complication in relation to exchanges, the large bulk of prisoners on both ld have had different witnesses, with a different story. It will be borne in mind that nearly all of the suffering endured by Federal prisoners happened after January, 1864. The acceptance of the proposition made by me, on behalf of the Confederate Government, would not only have furnished to the sick medicines and physicians, buhout the surgeons) were sent in 1865, and were allowed to be distributed by Federal officers to Federal prisoners. Why could not the more humane proposal of January, 1864, have been accepted? Iii. When it was ascertained that exchanges could not be made, either on the basis of the cartel, or officer for officer and man for
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The treatment of prisoners during the war between the States. (search)
arched five days on one meal each day, carried through filthy cars to Camp Morton, Indiana, on the 19th of October, 1863, where he was imprisoned in an old horse stable on the Fair Ground, without blanket, thinly clad, and without fire, until January, 1864, when he received one blanket; his body covered with rags and vermin, when the snow was from six to ten inches deep. Two stoves were all that was used to warm three hundred men, and then wood for half the time only was allowed. The prisonerined there about ten thousand men. Those men were retained in a famishing condition by order of Edwin M. Stanton, Secretary of War. That order was approved by Abraham Lincoln. It was read before the inside garrison of the prison sometime in January, 1864. It was read at assembly for duty on the 2d, in front of the prison. It went into effect on the following day. It continued in force until the expiration of my term of service, and, I have understood, until the close of the war. When it
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraphs. (search)
cellaneous Confederate Documents. Judge John F. Lay.--Confederate newspapers 1861 and 1862.--Map of Virginia used on the retreat from Richmond.--Map of the Seat of War in South Carolina and Georgia. Major Norman S. Walker, Liverpool.--Five bound volumes of the London Index, from May 1st 1862, to August 12th 1865. E. V. Fox, Esq.--Fox's mission to Russia in 1866. Mrs. Henry Pye, Richmond, Virginia.--Mss. of General Lee's final and full Report of the Pennsylvania Campaign (dated January 1864), copied by Michael Kelly, Clerk to General S. Cooper. R. S. Hollins, Baltimore, Maryland.--One bound file of Baltimore Sun, from October, 1860, to December 31st, 1865.--T. Ditterline's sketch of the battles of Gettysburg.--M. Jacobs' Invasion of Pennsylvania and Battle of Gettysbnrg. John McRae, Camden, South Carolina.--Complete file of Charleston Courier from May 1856 to February 1865.--Complete file of Richmond Dispatch from April 1861 to April 1864. James T. Bowyer, Fincastl
Heros von Borcke, Memoirs of the Confederate War for Independence, Chapter 24: (search)
bodies of troops. These recommendations for promotion were approved by General Lee, and desired, I am proud to say, by all the officers and men of the cavalry crops; but the repeated applications made by my General with this object were as often rejected by the officials at Richmond, who hesitated, as it seemed, to promote a foreigner too rapidly. Great satisfaction, however, was afforded me by the public acknowledgment of my insignificant services, which took place during the month of January 1864, in the form of a joint resolution of thanks by both Houses of the Confederate Congress. Lafayette was the last foreigner to whom this honour was accorded in America, and out of courtesy the resolution was couched in the same words as had been used on that occasion, and which were as follows:-- Whereas Major Heros Von Borcke of Prussia, Adjutant and Inspector-General of the Cavalry Corps of the Army of Northern Virginia, having left his own country to assist in securing the independe
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Life in Pennsylvania. (search)
n the game being played by the two armies at Gettysburg. As to the abandonment of the tactical defensive policy that we had agreed upon, there can be no doubt that General Lee deeply deplored it as a mistake. His remark, made just after the battle, It is all my fault, meant just what it said. It adds to the nobility and magnanimity of that remark, when we reflect that it was the utterance of a deep-felt truth, rather than a mere sentiment. In a letter written to me by General Lee, in January, 1864, he says: Had I taken your advice at Gettysburg, instead of pursuing the course I did, how different all might have been. Captain T. J. Gorie, of Houston, Texas, a gentleman of high position and undoubted integrity, writes to me upon this same point as follows: Another important circumstance which I distinctly remember was in the winter of 1864, when you sent me from East Tennessee to Orange Court-House with dispatches for General Lee. Upon my arrival there, General Lee asked me in his
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 35 (search)
Xxxiv. January, 1864 Hospitalities of the city to Gen. Morgan. call for a Dictator. letter from Gen. Lee. letters from Gov. Vance. accusation against Gen. Winder. treatment of Confederate prisoners (from the Chicago times). change of Federal policy. efforts to remove Col. Northrop. breach between the President and Congress. destitution of our prisoners. appeal of Gen. Lee to the army. New Conscription act. letter from Gen. Cobb. January 1 A bright windy day, and not cold. The President has a reception to-day, and the City Councils have voted the hospitalities of the city to Brig.-Gen. J. H. Morgan, whose arrival is expected. If he comes, he will be the hero, and will have a larger crowd of admirers around him than the President. The Councils have also voted a sword to ex-Gov. Letcher, whose term of service ended yesterday. Gov. Wm. Smith-nicknamed Extra-Billy — is to be inaugurated to-day. Flour is now held at $150 per barrel. Capt. Warner has ju
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Leading Confederates on the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
g in the game being played by the two armies at Gettysburg. As to the abandonment of the tactical defensive policy that we had agreed upon, there can be no doubt that General Lee deeply deplored it as a mistake. His remark, madb just after the battle, It is all my fault, meant just what it said. It adds to the nobility and magnanimity of that remark when we reflect that it was the utterance of a deep-felt truth rather than a mere sentiment. In a letter written to me by General Lee in January, 1864, he says: Had I taken your advice at Gettysburg instead of pursuing the course I did, how different all might have been. Captain T. J. Gorie, of Houston, Texas, a gentleman of high position and undoubted integrity, writes to me upon this same point as follows: Another important circumstance which I distinctly remember was in the winter of 1864, when you sent me from East Tennessee to Orange Courthouse with dispatches for General Lee. Upon my arrival there General Lee asked me in his te
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reply to General Longstreet's Second paper. (search)
ng out who that leader should have been — to wit: General James Longstreet. Accompanying the publication of the letter to his uncle, General Longstreet gave the following extract from a letter to him from General Lee, dated, as alleged, in January, 1864: Had I taken your advice at Gettysburg instead of pursuing the course I did, how different all things might have been. A letter from General Fitz Lee appeared in the public prints very shortly thereafter, and, in that letter, he spr all circumstances. It may be observed here, that, while General Longstreet has given a letter from General Lee to him, written since the war, to show their kindly personal relations, he has never yet given the full text of that letter of January, 1864, from which the brief extract before alluded to was taken, though the extract is repeated in the first article in the Times. Referring to the points made in the last-named article, General Longstreet says in the second article: These
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 9.97 (search)
. He was brave, honest, intelligent, a very capable soldier, subordinate to his superiors, just and kind to his subordinates, but jealous of his own rights, which he had the courage to maintain. He was never on the lookout to detect a slight, but saw one as soon as anybody when intentionally given. It may be that Longstreet was not sent to Knoxville for the reason stated, but because Mr. Davis had an exalted opinion of his own Departure of the First hospital train from Chattanooga, January, 1864, and interior of a hospital car. From a War-time sketch. military genius, and thought he saw a chance of killing two birds with one stone. On several occasions during the war he came to the relief of the Union army by means of his superior military genius. I speak advisedly when I say Mr. Davis prided himself on his military capacity. He says so himself virtually, in his answer to the notice of his nomination to the Confederate Presidency. Some of his generals have said so in th
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 4.14 (search)
oke.--editors. I then ordered the abandonment of Washington, but directed the holding of New Berne at all hazards. This was essential, because New Berne was a port into which blockade-runners could enter. General Banks had gone on an expedition up the Red River long before my promotion to general command. I had opposed the movement strenuously, but acquiesced because it was the order of my superior at the time. General Halleck's instructions for this movement were promulgated during January and February, 1864.--editors. By direction of Halleck I had reenforced Banks with a corps of about ten thousand men from Sherman's command. This reenforcement was wanted back badly before the forward movement commenced. But Banks had got so far that it seemed best that he should take Shreveport, on the Red River, and turn over the line of that river to Steele, who commanded in Arkansas, to hold instead of the line of the Arkansas. Orders were given accordingly, and with the expectation t
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