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urgeon would look over the sick-list of animals, and prescribe for such as seemed worth saving or within the reach of treatment, while others would be condemned, led off, and shot. To bury these, and those dying without the aid of the bullet, I have shown, was a part of the fatigue duty of artillerymen and cavalrymen. The procuring of wood was often a task involving no little labor for all arms of the military service. At Brandy Station, Virginia, before the army left there on the 3d of May, 1864, some commands were obliged to go four or five miles for it. The inexperienced can leave little idea of how rapidly a forest containing many acres of heavy growth would disappear before an army of seventy-five or a hundred thousand men camped in and about it. The scarcity of wood was generally made apparent by this fact, that when an army first went into camp trees were cut with the scarf two or three feet above the ground, but as the scarcity increased these stumps would get chipped dow
John D. Billings, Hardtack and Coffee: The Unwritten Story of Army Life, XX.
Army road
and bridge Builders. (search)
s among his four corps, giving to each about nine hundred feet of bridge material. These pontons were suitably hinged to form a wagon A canvas pontoon boat. From a Photograph. body, in which was carried the canvas cover, anchor, chains, and a due proportion of other bridge materials. This kind of bridge was used by the volunteer engineers of the Army of the Potomac. I recall two such bridges. One spanned the Rapidan at Ely's Ford, and was crossed by the Second Corps the night of May 3, 1864, when it entered upon the Wilderness campaign. The other was laid across the Po River, by the Fiftieth New York Engineers, seven days afterwards, and over this Hancock's Veterans crossed — those, at least, who survived the battle of that eventful Tuesday-before nightfall. But all of the long bridges, notably those crossing the Chickahominy, the James, the Appomattox, which now come to my mind, were supported by wooden boats of the French pattern. These were thirty-one feet long, two
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 31: from the Rapidan to the James. (search)
Chapter 31: from the Rapidan to the James. On the 3rd of May, 1864, the positions of the Confederate Army under General Lee, and the Federal Army under Lieutenant General Grant in Virginia, were as follows: General Lee held the southern bank of the Rapidan River, in Orange County, with his right resting near the mouth of Mine Run, and his left extending to Liberty Mills on the road from Gordonsville (via Madison CourtHouse) to the Shenandoah Valley; while the crossings of the river on the right, and the roads on the left, were watched by cavalry: Ewell's corps was on the right, Hill's on the left, and two divisions of Longstreet's corps were encamped in the rear, near Gordonsville. Grant's army (composed of the Army of the Potomac under Meade, and the 9th corps under Burnside) occupied the north banks of the Rapidan and Robinson rivers; the main body being encamped in Culpeper County and on the Rappahannock River. I am satisfied that General Lee's army did not exceed 50,000
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 38: battle of the Wilderness. (search)
ned to withdraw without making battle. As the purpose of this writing is to convey ideas of personal observations and experience, it will be confined, as far as practicable, to campaigns or parts of them with which I was directly or indirectly connected. So, when participants and partisans have passed away, I shall have contributed my share towards putting the historian in possession of evidence which he can weigh with that of other actors in the great drama. At midnight of the 3d of May, 1864, the Army of the Potomac took its line of march for the lower crossings of the Rapidan River at Germania and Ely's Fords, the Fifth and Sixth Corps for the former, the Second for the latter, Wilson's division of cavalry leading the first, Gregg's the second column. The cavalry was to-secure the crossings and lay bridges for the columns as they came up. Wilson's cavalry crossed at Germania ford, drove off the Confederate outpost, and began the construction of a bridge at daylight. Gregg
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 3 (search)
Summary of the principal events. of some of the minor events noted in this summary no circumstantial reports are on file. All such are designated in the index. May 1, 1864.Skirmish at Stone Church. May 2, 1864.Skirmish at Lee's Cross-Roads, near Tunnel Hill. Skirmish near Ringgold Gap. May 3, 1864.Skirmish at Catoosa Springs. Skirmish at Red Clay. Skirmish at Chickamauga Creek. May 4, 1864.Maj. Gen. Frank P. Blair, jr., assumes command of the Seventeenth Army Corps. Skirmish on the Varnell's Station Road. May 5, 1864.Skirmish near Tunnel Hill. May 6-7, 1864.Skirmishes at Tunnel Hill. May 7, 1864.Skirmish at Varnell's Station. Skirmish near Nickajack Gap. May 8-11, 1864.Demonstration against Rocky Face Ridge, with combats at Buzzard Roost or Mill Creek Gap, and Dug Gap. May 8-13, 1864.Demonstration against Resaca, with combats at Snake Creek Gap, Sugar Valley, and near Resaca. May 9-13, 1864.Demonstration against Dalton, with combats near Varnell's Station (
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 10 (search)
re directed to facilitate these movements, and always with a distinct idea of their object. First. The Atlanta campaign, from the 1st of July, 1864, to the occupation of the city, September 2, 1864. On the 1st of July, 1864, I was on duty as chief engineer with the army commanded by Maj. Gen. W. T. Sherman, then before Kenesaw Mountain, a position to which I had been assigned by Special Field Orders, No. 1, headquarters Military Division of the Mississippi, dated Chattanooga, Tenn., May 3, 1864. At that time the engineer organization for the army in the field was altogether inadequate. There were within the limits of the military division the following engineer organizations, viz: First Michigan Engineers and Mechanics, and First Missouri Engineers. Both these regiments belonged to the Army of the Cumberland, and were distributed as follows: The former along the railroads forming our lines of supply, engaged in building block-houses to defend them against raiding parties of
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 23 (search)
de, First Division, Fourth Army Corps, during the months of May and June, 1864. Zzz G. W. Pepoon, First Lieutenant and Provost-Marshal. Inclosure no. 2. Effective force of Second brigade, First Division, Fovrth Army Corps, May 3, 1864. Zzz H. F. Temple, Captain and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General. Blue Springs, Tenn., May 3, 1864. Inclosure no. 3. Report of killed, wounded, and missing of the Second brigade, First Division, Fourth Army Corps, froepoon, First Lieutenant and Provost-Marshal. Inclosure no. 2. Effective force of Second brigade, First Division, Fovrth Army Corps, May 3, 1864. Zzz H. F. Temple, Captain and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General. Blue Springs, Tenn., May 3, 1864. Inclosure no. 3. Report of killed, wounded, and missing of the Second brigade, First Division, Fourth Army Corps, from May 3 to June 30, 1864. Zzz H. F. Temple, Captain and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 27 (search)
th Illinois, Colonel Bennett; Eighty-fourth Illinois, Colonel Waters; Eightieth Illinois, Lieutenant-Colonel Kilgour; N inth Indiana, Colonel Suman; Thirty-sixth Indiana, Lieutenant-Colonel Carey; Thirtieth Indiana, Captain Dawson; Seventy-seventh Pennsylvania, Capt. J. J. Lawson, to which was attached Batltry B, Pennsylvania. Effective force, officers and men, about 2,900. By orders from Major-General Stanley, division commander, we marched with the balance of his command on the 3d day of May, 1864, from our camp at Blue Springs, near Cleveland, Tenn., to Red Clay, on the Georgia line, and camped for the night. May 4, marched with the division to Catoosa Springs, Ga. (with light skirmishing), for concentration with the army, where we rested until May 7, when we marched with the corps, drove the enemy from and took possession of Tunnel Hill, Ga. For several succeeding days we advanced upon and ineffectually endeavored to drive the enemy from Rocky Face Ridge in our front. My po
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 30 (search)
No. 26. report of Col. John E. Bennett, Seventy-fifth Illinois Infantry. Hdqrs. Seventy-Fifth Illinois Vol. Infantry, Near Atlanta, Ga., September 13, 1864. Captain: In compliance with orders received from headquarters Third Brigade, I have the honor to make the following report of the part taken by the Seventy-fifth Illinois Volunteers in the recent campaign resulting in the capture of the city of Atlanta: On the morning of May 3, 1864, in obedience to the order of Col. William Grose, commanding brigade, this regiment marched from Blue Springs, Tenn., in the direction of Red Clay, Ga., at which place the command went into camp for the night. At 6 a. m. the next day moved toward Dalton, and in the afternoon formed line of battle and bivouacked near Catoosa Springs. Again, on the morning of the 7th, moved to Tunnel Hill, formed line of battle, and advanced upon the enemy, who were behind works, but they soon evacuated them, leaving our troops in possession of the town
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 32 (search)
Ninth Indiana Infantry. Hdqrs. Ninth Indiana Veteran Vol. Infty., Near Atlanta, Ga., September 10, 1864. Captain: In obedience to orders I submit the following report as to the part taken by my regiment in the late campaign, commencing May 3, 1864, and ending September 5, 1864: Left camp, Blue Springs, Tenn., May 3, 1864, and marched in the direction of Dalton, Ga.; reached Red Clay and encamped for the night. Reached Catoosa Springs at 2 p. m. May 4; remained at the above place alMay 3, 1864, and marched in the direction of Dalton, Ga.; reached Red Clay and encamped for the night. Reached Catoosa Springs at 2 p. m. May 4; remained at the above place all day of the 5th of May. On the morning of the 6th moved half a mile to the right and fortified. Marched at 5 o'clock on the morning of the 7th due south; reached Tunnel Hill at 2 p. m., and there encamped for the night. May 8, moved forward about four miles; there was some skirmishing, and the enemy were driven through the gap leading to Dalton; remained in camp the rest of the day and night. May 9, remained in position until 2 p. m., when we moved three or four miles to the right, where w
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