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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 566 566 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 45 45 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 24 24 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 14 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 13 13 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 11 11 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 10 10 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 8 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 7 7 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 7 7 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 9: Poetry and Eloquence. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for May 6th, 1864 AD or search for May 6th, 1864 AD in all documents.

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ng composed entirely of troops from one State. It contained the Second, Third, Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Vermont Infantry, and later the First Vermont Heavy Artillery. It was in this respect conspicuous in the Union army, which did not adopt the Confederate policy of grouping regiments from the same State in brigades. The gallant record of the Vermont brigade was nowhere more conspicuous than in the Wilderness campaign. The first five regiments lost in the battle of the Wilderness, May 5-6, 1864, 195 killed, 1,017 wounded, and 57 missing, making a total of 1,269. Within a week its loss had amounted to 58 per cent. of the number engaged. The words of the poet are therefore no merely fanciful picture of frightful loss in battle. There were a dozen battles in which the Federal armies alone lost more than 10,000 men, enough in each case to populate a city, and it has been estimated that the totals on both sides amounted to more than 700,000 killed and wounded. When it is recalled th
ome Southern home was robed in gloom, Some wife or mother looked with longing eyes Through the sad days and nights with tears and sighs, Hope slowly hardening into gaunt Despair. Then let your foeman's grave remembrance share: Pity a higher charm to Valor lends, And in the realms of Sorrow all are friends. Henry Peterson. Hollywood cemetery in Richmond, Virginia: 1,800 Confederate soldiers lie buried here. Confederate graves in the Wilderness: reminders of the battle of May 5-6, 1864. Graves of Federal soldiers: near Burnside's bridge on the battlefield of Antietam A corner of Hollywood cemetery: Richmond, Virginia, in 1865 The cemetery at Antietam, not far from the scene of the photograph above, taken soon after the battle on September 16-17, 1862, contains the graves of 4,684 soldiers, of which 1,829 are marked unknown. Even a frail memorial like the one at the grave of the Georgia Volunteer usually fails to record the native heath of him who lies below, or