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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 102 102 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 18 18 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 16 16 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 13 13 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 10 10 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 7 7 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 7 7 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 6 6 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 7, April, 1908 - January, 1909 5 5 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 4 4 Browse Search
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Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies., Chapter 1: the situation. (search)
present for duty equipped at 97,273-in remarkable agreement with the figures taken in the field. Compare the admirable showing of that clear-headed officer, General A. A. Humphreys, Virginia Campaign, Appendix, p. 409. The number of men available for battle in the Fifth Corps at the start was 25,695. The character of the fighting in this campaign may be shown, however dimly, by citing here the report of our Corps field hospital for one day only, that of the engagement at Laurel Hill, May 8, 1864: Admitted to hospital, 3001; of whom 106 were from other corps; 27 Confederates; 107 sick. Sent to the rear, 2388; fell into the hands of the enemy, 391; died in hospital, 121; left 206, of whom 126 were able to walk in the morning. Or take the totals treated in the field hospital alone for the first nine days of the campaign. Number admitted, 5257; sent to the rear, 4190; died in hospital, 179; fell into hands of the enemy, 787. Adding to this the number killed outright, not less t
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 3 (search)
, assumes command of the Seventeenth Army Corps. Skirmish on the Varnell's Station Road. May 5, 1864.Skirmish near Tunnel Hill. May 6-7, 1864.Skirmishes at Tunnel Hill. May 7, 1864.Skirmish at Varnell's Station. Skirmish near Nickajack Gap. May 8-11, 1864.Demonstration against Rocky Face Ridge, with combats at Buzzard Roost or Mill Creek Gap, and Dug Gap. May 8-13, 1864.Demonstration against Resaca, with combats at Snake Creek Gap, Sugar Valley, and near Resaca. May 9-13, 1864.DemonstraMay 8-13, 1864.Demonstration against Resaca, with combats at Snake Creek Gap, Sugar Valley, and near Resaca. May 9-13, 1864.Demonstration against Dalton, with combats near Varnell's Station (9th and 12th) and at Dalton (13th). May 13, 1864.Skirmish at Tilton. May 14-15, 1864.Battle of Resaca. May 15, 1864.Skirmish at Armuchee Creek. Skirmish near Rome. May 16, 1864.Skirmish near Calhoun. Action at Rome (or Parker's) Cross-Roads. Skirmish at Floyd's Spring. May 17, 1864.Engagement at Adairsville. Action at Rome. Affair at Madison Station, Ala. May 18, 1864.Skirmish at Pine Log Creek. May 18-19, 1864.Combats near K
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 15 (search)
s. 15, 16, 17, and 18 will appear in the Atlas. It may not be inappropriate, now that I am separated from your army, to express my appreciation of the uniform confidence reposed in me by the commanding general, and to acknowledge that I owe any success or reputation I may have gained while in command of the Fourth Corps, in a great measure to himself. Herewith please find a list of casualties, also of recommendations for promotion. Report of casualties in Fourth Army Corps from May 8, 1864, to and including July 26, 1864. Command.Killed.Wounded.Missing.Aggregate. Officers.Men.Officers.Men.Officers.Men. Headquarters Fourth Army Corps002300235 First Division15661,149378841,4441,528 Second Division323751141,8640731462,3122,458 Third Division27370891,82242671202,4592,579 Total749622714,83874183526,2186,560 Aggregate strength on leaving Cleveland, excluding the regiments left back as guards at that place and Ooltewah, 20,000 (very nearly). Promotions for efficien
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 105 (search)
No. 101. report of Lieut. Col. Joseph H. Brigham, Sixty-ninth Ohio Infantry, of operations May 8-August 25. Hdqrs. Sixty-Ninth Ohio Vet. Vol. Infantry, Atlanta, Ga., September 10, 1864. The Sixty-ninth Regiment Ohio Veteran Volunteer Infantry, Col. M. F. Moore in command, reached Chattanooga, Tenn., on the 8th day of May, 1864, on return from veteran furlough. May 9, started for the front to join brigade; camped in Rossville, Ga., same night. Next day marched two miles beyond Ringgold, Ga., and went into camp. May 11, broke camp and marched to Buzzard Roost Gap, and there the command reported to General King, commanding Second Brigade, First Division, Fourteenth Army Corps. On the next evening the regiment continued their line of march, passing through Snake Creek Gap, and reaching the battle-ground of Resaca at sunset on the 13th day of May, and was placed in position on the front line and was relieved late in the evening by the Seventy-ninth Ohio Volunteer Infan
d got possession of Spottsylvania, driving the enemy's cavalry a mile beyond, as will be seen by the following despatch sent me at 9 A. M. of the 8th: headquarters Third division, cavalry Corps, Army of the Potomac. Spottsylvania Court House, May 8, 1864-9 A. M. Lieutenant-Colonel Forsyth, Chief-of-staff, C. C. Have run the enemy's cavalry a mile fiom Spottsylvania Court House; have charged them, and drove them through the village; am fighting now with a considerable force, supposed to be Ld whip Stuart. At this General Grant remarked: Did he say so? Then let him go out and do it. This intimation was immediately acted upon by General Meade, and a little later the following order came to me: headquarters Army of the Potomac. May 8th, 1864-1 P. M. General Sheridan, Commanding Cavalry Corps. The major-general commanding directs you to immediately concentrate your available mounted force, and with your ammunition trains and such supply trains as are filled (exclusive of ambula
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Through the Wilderness. (search)
south, their left rested at the bridge. Brooke's and Brown's brigades were in front, or south of the Shady Grove road. North-east, and to their rear one and a half miles, Field's guns were planted in intrenchments, sweeping the ground behind them and covering the pontoon-bridge over the Po. Hancock drew back Brooke and Brown to the right and to the rear; and then Miles and Smyth retired to the crest south of the pontoon-bridges. Relative positions of the opposing Corps at Spotsylvania, May 8-21, 1864. These troops formed a tete-du-pont facing south. Heth's division, of Hill's corps, attacked the two right brigades with vigor, but was twice repulsed. The Union loss was very heavy. Hancock, finding the enemy repulsed and the woods on fire in the rear of his line, crossed to the north side of the Po River. One gun, the first ever lost by the Second Corps, was jammed between two trees in the midst of this fire, and was abandoned by Birney's men. Many of our wounded perished
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 4.19 (search)
The death of General John Sedgwick. condensed from a letter to General J. W. Latta, President of the Sedgwick Memorial association. by Martin T. Mcmahon, Brevet Major-General, U. S. V.; chief-of-staff, Sixth Corps. On May 8th, 1864, the Sixth Corps made a rapid march to the support of Warren, near Spot-sylvania Court House. We arrived there about 5 P. M., and passed the rest of the day in getting into position on Warren's left. After nightfall General Sedgwick rode back into an open field near General Warren's headquarters and, with his staff, lay down on the grass and slept until daylight. Shortly after daylight he moved out upon his line of battle. We had no tents or breakfast during that night or morning. The general made some necessary changes in the line and gave a few unimportant orders, and sat down with me upon a hard-tack box, with his back resting against a tree. The men, one hundred feet in front, were just finishing a line of rifle-pits, which ran to the rig
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 11: advance of the Army of the Potomac on Richmond. (search)
llage that derived its name from the edifice. This county received its name from Alexander Spottswood, Governor of Virginia, who owned and worked iron mines in that region, and at what is now known as Germania Ford, he founded a town, the inhabitants of which being chiefly German miners, it was called Germania. The last syllable of Spottswood's name, wood, was Latinized, and hence the name of Spottsylvania. been cut and felled across it, and it was about eight o'clock on Sunday morning May 8, 1864. before the head of Warren's column, composed of two brigades under General Robinson, emerged from the woods in battle order at Alsop's farm upon the high open plain two or three miles from Spottsylvania Court-House. There the road from Todd's Tavern forks, one branch leading toward the court-house, and the other to Laurel Hill. Beyond this plain was a slight depression, and where the road ascended to Spottsylvania Ridge the slope was covered with woods. Up to this time Warren had me
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 12: operations against Richmond. (search)
and when General Kautz struck the Weldon road, as we have seen, he found these re-enforcements for Lee passing over it. A large portion of them were left south of that cutting, D. H. Hill, with 8,000 troops, had passed northward, and Beauregard, with 5,000, was south of Stony Creek Station. Besides the bridge and track, a large quantity of provisions and forage was destroyed at that place. but as Kautz could not hold the road nor advance toward Petersburg, he returned to City Point, May 8, 1864. leaving the Confederates to make their way without further molestation. Before Petersburg was seriously threatened by Butler, Beauregard's troops were there in strong force. It was expected that General Butler's movements, after he should gain a position on the south side of the James River, and intrench it, should be governed much by those of the Army of the Potomac, with which he was acting as an auxiliary. It was believed that the latter would march quickly from the Rapid Anna to
Va., Oct. 27, 1864 16 Dahlgren Raid, Va., March--, 1864 10 Bellefield, Va., Dec. 10, 1864 1 Todd's Tavern, Va., May 8, 1864 1 Dinwiddie C. H., Va., March 31, 1865 27 South Anna, Va., May 10, 1864 2 Deatonsville, Va., April 6, 1865 7 Ash battles. K. & M. W. battles. K. & M. W. battles. K. & M. W. Leesburg, Va., Sept. 17, 1862 1 Todd's Tavern, Va., May 8, 1864 3 Boydton Road, Va., Oct. 27, 1864 6 Beverly Ford, Va., June 9, 1863 6 Near Richmond, Va., May 12, 1864 3 Prince Ge10 27 Gettysburg, Pa. 6 56   62 Bristoe Station, Va.     1 1 Wilderness, Va.   3   3 Corbin's Bridge, Va., May 8, 1864 5 31   36 Po River, Va., May 10, 1864 3 10   13 Spotsylvania, Va., May 12-18, 1864 13 38 2 53 North Anna and in May, 1864, it served under Sherman in the Atlanta campaign. The first battle of that campaign occurred at Dug Gap, May 8, 1864, the Twenty-ninth sustaining the heaviest loss in that action; its casualties at Dug Gap were 26 killed, 67 wounded, a
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