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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 60 60 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 20 20 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 12 12 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 12 12 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 8 8 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 7 7 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 5 5 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 5 5 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 4 4 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 3 3 Browse Search
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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 22 (search)
28-September 8. Hdqrs. Thirty-Eighth Illinois Vet. Vol. Infty., Near Atlanta, Ga., September 11, 1864. Captain: I have the honor to make the following report of the part taken by the Thirty-eighth Regiment Illinois Veteran Volunteer Infantry in the campaign: The regiment left Chattanooga May 28, on its return to the field from veteran furlough, and reported at Rossville, by order of General Steedman, to take charge of and escort a drove of cattle to IResaca. Arrived at Resaca June 2, 1864. There the drove, numbering over 1,200 head, was transferred to Captain Thornton, commissary of subsistence. He called upon me for guard to the front, showing authority from General Sherman for his demand. Addition had been made to the drove, making over 1,700 head, thereby entailing very heavy guard upon the regiment, which numbered only 180 effective men. Arrived at Acworth, Ga., June 8. June 9, were relieved and reported to the brigade. June 10, moved with the brigade, and particip
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 43 (search)
ack. 8th, returned to Atlanta. The above summary indicates the marked points of a campaign of incessant marching, building works, and fighting. The records of the regiment exhibit the loss of several officers and many men, chief among them the accomplished, zealous, and brave Lieut. Col. George W. Chandler, killed in the charge of the 27th of June, than whom no purer or more gallant spirit has fallen as a sacrifice for the honor of the Government. First Lieut. Noah W. Rae, who died June 2, 1864, from wounds received May 17, was an excellent and brave officer. I deem worthy of special mention for meritorious conduct during the campaign the following officers: Capt. John W. Chickering, jr., Company F; Capt. Dean R. Chester, Company G; First Lieut. James Rhines, Company E; First Lieut. Albion G. Burnap, Company A. Accompanying this is a list of casualties Nominal list (omitted) shows 1 officer and 25 men killed, 4 officers and 81 men wounded, and 1 officer and 3 men missin
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 57 (search)
enemy's means of defense in our front. Intake pleasure in communicating the intelligence and zeal exhibited by my brigade commanders, General Hazen and Colonels Gibson and Knefler. I append a summary of casualties: Zzz Very respectfully, your obedient servant, th. J. Wood, Brigadier-General of Volunteers, Commanding. Colonel Fullerton, Assistant Adjutant-General. Addenda. General orders, no. 38. Hdqrs. 3D Div., 4TH Army Corps, In the Field, near Dallas, Ga., June 2, 1864. The general commanding desires to express to the division his high appreciation of their good conduct in the battles of the 27th ultimo, and to thank the officers and soldiers for their heroism displayed on that occasion. Ordered to assault a strongly intrenched position, the troops advanced to the attack with a vigorous, decided earnestness and heroic determination which covered all engaged with the highest honor, and would have insured success if their flanks could have been prope
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 114 (search)
ion of Company D, filling a gap between two battalions on the front line of the brigade. On the 30th of May the remaining seventy men of the battalion were directed to cross the creek, occupy and build works on a hill on the left of the brigade, a position not previously occupied by troops. Shortly after the specified works were commenced the enemy attacked the position, but were repulsed, with a loss to the battalion of 2 killed and 6 wounded. Was relieved from duty at this point on 2d of June, 1864. On the ensuing day relieved the First Battalion, Eighteenth U. S. Infantry, on first line of the brigade. On the morning of the 5th of June the rebels were found to have again vacated their works in our front. Marched on 6th about seven miles toward Big Shanty. Camped in thick woods. The battalion was employed until the 18th of June in digging rifle-pits, supporting batteries, performing the usual guard and picket duties, and in moving nearer to the line of railroad between Acwort
Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert, Chapter 20: from Spottsylvania to Cold Harbor (search)
hole he had dug to cook in — a sort of safety-kitchen. The man's back was turned toward us, his elbows were on his knees, and his head sunk in his hands. After Campbell's death, as he was still sitting there, thinking he must be wounded, I proposed to one of the men to run out and bring him back into the work. We tried it, but he cast off our hands and we had to leave him to his fate. In a few moments he was shot in the head and tumbled in upon the cook in the kitchen-dead. The 2d of June, 1864, was the heaviest, the hardest-worked and the most straining day of my life. Not only did I have my ordinary duties of a day of battle to perform, but I had, in addition, to open and to keep open roads for getting in ammunition, to bridge two or three ravines, to visit Falligant's gun several times and to keep it supplied with ammunition, which had to be passed along the infantry line by hand for quite a long distance. When night came I believe I was more nearly wornout than on any ot
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 39: Miscellaneous operations, land and sea.--operations in the Nansemond, Cape Fear, Pamunky, Chucka Tuck and James Rivers.--destruction of blockade-runners.--adventures of Lieutenant Cushing, etc. (search)
or Acting-Rear-Admiral Lee should assume the responsibility of placing the obstructions in Trent's Reach, although why there should have been any dispute in such a matter it is difficult to see. It was certainly distasteful to the Confederates, who saw all their schemes of fire-rafts, torpedo-boats and iron-clad raids completely circumvented. The following letter from General Butler to Acting Rear-Admiral Lee will show the General's views on the subject: Headquarters In The Field, June 2d, 1864. S Admiral: Your communication dated June 2d, in regard to the obstructions, is received. The five vessels sent up were procured by my order for the purpose of being used as obstructions to the river, if, in the judgment of the naval commander, they would add to the security of his fleet. I have no difficulty as to the point at which we desire to secure the river. It is at the right of my line, near Curtis' House, at the ravine; but whether the river should be secured by obstruct
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 59: (search)
il 23, 1864 Niphon. Schooner Corse 5,850 66 754 51 5,096 15 Key West Jan. 7, 1865 Rachel Seaman, Kensington.   Cotton, 10 1/2 bales 2,735 11 394 60 2,340 5<*> do June 1, 1864 Roebuck.   Cotton, 64 bales 16,867 72 1,735 06 15,132 66 do June 2, 1864 James L. Davis.   Cotton, 154 bales, and 5 hogsheads sugar 33,901 53 7,916 89 25,984 64 Springfield May 19, 1864 Conestoga.   Cotton, 6 bales 1,444 97 140 13 1,304 84 do Jan. 6, 1865 Pittsburg.   Cotton, 10 bales 2,202 48 168 86 2,03312, 1864 Keystone State, James Adger. Schooner Exchange 6,052 87 1,052 55 5,000 32 New Orleans April 23, 1864 Antona. Schooner Ellen 5,557 23 970 58 4,586 65 do June 10, 1864 Gertrude. Schooner Edward 2,343 64 203 66 2,139 98 Key West June 2, 1864 San Jacinto. Schooner Excelsior 2,630 88 678 31 1,952 57 New Orleans May 21, 1864 Katahdin. Steamer Emilie 28,305 97 3,929 13 24,376 84 Philadelphia April 26, 1865 Flag, Restless. Schooner Experiment 20,785 18 1,460 11 19,325 07 New O
th Tennessee (Unions), Company C:--Sergeant John Gossett; killed at Utoy Creek while planting his colors on the enemy's works. Nineteenth Wisconsin:--Chaplain J. H. Nichols; died Jan., 1863, in an insane asylum. Fifty-second Indiana, Company B:--Timothy Westport; discharged April 27, 1863, for loss of speech. Twenty-first Illinois:--Colonel U. S. Grant; enlisted June 15, 1861; promoted Brigadier dier General, Aug. 7, 1861. Twenty-fifth Wisconsin, Company G:--(Geo. W. Ide; died June 2, 1864, at Dallas, Ga., of sunstroke. First Kentucky Cavalry (Union), Company H:--Geo. W. Eller; killed Feb. 10, 1863, in a personal difficulty, A frequent item in the Tennessee and Kentucky rolls. in Wayne Co., Ky. Fifth Tennessee Cavalry (Union), Company F:--J. N. Gilliam; killed near Tracy City, Tenn., by guerrillas, A frequent item in the Tennessee and kentucky rolls. Aug. 4, 1864. Eighteenth Wisconsin, Company B:--Redmond McGuire; killed April 10, 1862, in prison, by rebel gu
mville, Va., April 7, 1865 2 Hawes' Shop, Va., May 28, 1864 1 Appomattox, Va., April 9, 1865 7 Cold Harbor, Va., June 2, 1864 2 Picket Duty 2 Skirmish, Va., June 19, 1864 1 Place Unknown 11 notes.--This regiment sustained the heaviest sustained its greatest loss; 30 killed, 104 wounded, and 69 missing or prisoners. In the affair at Bermuda Hundred, June 2d, 1864, it also lost 78 captured, in addition to 25 killed or wounded. The regiment sailed with General Terry's expedition ow Bridge, Va., May 13, 1864 2 Deep Creek, Va., April 3, 1865 1 Williamsport, Md., July 6, 1863 2 Cold Harbor, Va., June 2, 1864 3 Namozine Church, Va., April 3, ‘65 3 Boonsboro, Md,, July 8, 1863 5 White Oak Swamp, Va., June 13, ‘64 3 Appomatt1864 24 Cedar Creek, Va. 6 Spotsylvania, Va., May 18, 1864 1 Petersburg, Va., March 25, 1864 4 Cold Harbor, Va., June 2, 1864 6 Fall of Petersburg, Va. 2 Cold Harbor, Va., June 3, 1864 6 Nov. 1864, Place unknown 1 Present, also, at Ant
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), IV. Cold Harbor (search)
on him. Then he called Wright slow (a very true proposition as a general one). In the midst of these night-thoughts, comes here from General Smith bright, active, self-sufficient Engineer-Lieutenant Farquhar, who reports that his superior had arrived, fought, etc., etc., but that he had brought little ammunition, no transportation and that he considered his position precarious. Then, why in Hell did he come at all for? roared the exasperated Meade, with an oath that was rare with him. June 2, 1864 To-day has been occupied with strategy; but our strategy is of a bloody kind, and even the mere movements have not passed without the sounds of cannon and musketry for two or three hours. Sharp as steel traps those Rebs! We cannot shift a hundred yards, but presto! skirmishers forward! and they come piling in, pop, pop, pop; with reserves close behind and a brigade or two hard on the reserves, all poking and probing as much as to say: Hey! What! Going are you! Well, where? How fa
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