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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Kentucky Volunteers. (search)
ttanooga till May. Atlanta (Ga.) Campaign May to September. Duty in rear of army covering and protecting railroad at Wauhatchie, Lafayette, Calhoun, Dalton and Resaca. At Wauhatchie May 5 to June 18. (A detachment at Lexington, Ky., June 10, 1864.) At Lafayette till August 4. Actions at Lafayette June 24 and 30. At Calhoun August 4 to October 12. Pine Log Creek and near Fairmount August 14. Resaca October 12-13. Near Summerville October 18. Little River, Ala., Octon, 23rd Army Corps, Dept. of the Ohio, to August, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, District of Kentucky, Dept. of Ohio, to April, 1865. Service. Operating against guerrillas in Kentucky till April, 1865. Action at Lexington, Ky., June 10, 1864. Cynthiana June 12. Sibley County, Ky., September 3. Burbridge's Expedition to Southwest Virginia September 20-October 17. Laurel Creek Gap and Clinch Mountain October 1. Saltsville, Va., October 2. Kingsport, Tenn., October
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Michigan Volunteers. (search)
an February 6-7, 1864. Campaign from the Rapidan to the James May 4-June 9. Battles of the Wilderness May 5-7. Laurel Hill May 6. Spottsylvania May 8-12. Po River May 10. Spottsylvania Court House May 12-21. Assault on the Salient ( Bloody Angle ) May 12. Harris Farm, Fredericksburg Road, May 19. North Anna River May 21-23. On line of the Pamunkey May 26-28. Totopotomoy May 28-31. Cold Harbor June 1-9. Left front June 9. Non-veterans mustered out June 10, 1864. Veterans and Recruits transferred to 5th Michigan Infantry June 13, 1864. Regiment lost during service 4 Officers and 154 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 2 Officers and 89 Enlisted men by disease. Total 249. Reorganized. Organized at Grand Rapids, Adrian and Pontiac, Michigan, August 24 to October 12, 1864. Mustered in October 15, 1864. Left State for Decatur, Ala., October 20. Attached to District of Northern Alabama, Dept. of the Cumberland, to Novem
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Missouri Volunteers. (search)
Duty in 7th Military District, North Missouri. 64th Missouri Regiment Enrolled Militia Infantry. Duty in 1st Military District. 65th Missouri Regiment Enrolled Militia Infantry. Affair near Breckenridge June 9, 1864. Operations against Price September and October, 1864. Surrender of Carrollton October 17, 1864. Duty in District of North Missouri. 66th Missouri Regiment Enrolled Militia Infantry. Duty in 8th Military District, Dept. Missouri. At Milan, Mo., June 10, 1864. 66th Missouri Regiment Provisional Enrolled Militia Infantry. Duty in 8th Military District, North Missouri. 67th Missouri Regiment Enrolled Militia Infantry. Placed on duty in 8th Military District, North Missouri, June, 1864. 67th Missouri Regiment Provisional Enrolled Militia Infantry. At Danville, Mo. 68th Missouri Regiment Enrolled Militia Infantry. No details. 68th Missouri Provisional Enrolled Militia Infantry. Duty in 1st Military District, Dept. of
Columbus, Ohio, till March. Ordered to Lexington, Ky., March 24, thence to Frankfort, and duty there till May, operating against guerrillas. Moved to Nashville, Tenn., May 1-4, thence to Gallatin, Tenn., June, and guard duty along Louisville & Nashville Railroad from Nashville to borders of Kentucky till May, 1864. Butler's Mill, near Buck Lodge, June 30 (Detachment). Moved to Bridgeport, Ala., May 4. Garrison duty there till January, 1865. Skirmish at Cane Creek, Ala., June 10, 1864. At Stevenson, Ala., January to June, 1865. Mustered out June 29, 1865. Regiment lost during service 3 Officers and 27 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 1 Officer and 21 Enlisted men by disease. Total 52. 107th Ohio Regiment Infantry. Organized at Camp Taylor, Cleveland, Ohio, and mustered in September 9, 1862. Moved to Covington, Ky., September 28, and duty in the Defenses of Cincinnati, Ohio, till October 5, 1862. At Delaware, Ohio, October 5-12. Ord
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Pennsylvania Volunteers. (search)
November 7-8. Rappahannock Station November 7. Mine Run Campaign November 26-December 2. Mine Run November 26-30. Rapidan Campaign May and June, 1864. Battles of the Wilderness May 5-7; Laurel Hill May 8; Spottsylvania May 8-12; Spottsylvania Court House May 12-21. Assault on the Salient May 12. Harris Farm May 19. North Anna River May 23-26. Jericho Ford May 25. Line of the Pamunkey May 26-28. Totopotomoy May 28-31. Left front June 1. Mustered out June 10, 1864. Regiment lost during service 6 Officers and 102 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 2 Officers and 64 Enlisted men by disease. Total 174. 1st Pennsylvania Regiment Militia Infantry. Called September 4, 1862, to resist Lee's invasion of Maryland Disbanded September 24, 1862. 1st Pennsylvania Battalion Infantry. 6 months. Organized at Harrisburg June and July, 1863. Mustered out January 9, 1864. 100 days. Organized at Philadelphia, Pittsburg and Harris
Doc. 111. loss of the Housatonic. Charleston, S. C., June 10, 1864. Since the destruction of the Housatonic, at Charleston, nothing has been heard of Captain Dixon and his crew, by whom the act was accomplished. The following letter on the subject is addressed to Major-General Maury: Office Submarine defence, Charleston, April 29, 1864. General — The United States sloop of war Housatonic was attacked and destroyed by Lieutenant Dixon and crew on the night of the seventeenth of February. See Rebellion Record, Vol. 8, p. 391. Documents. Since that time no information has been received of either boat or crew. I am of the opinion that the torpedo being placed at the bow of the boat, she went into the hole made in the Housatonic by explosion of the torpedo, and did not have power sufficient to back out, consequently sunk with her. I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant, M. M. Gray, Captain in charge Torpedoes. To Major-Gener
imals. And the rank of Captain by brevet upon Ferdinand Owen, First Lieutenant Company I, Tenth Missouri cavalry,who when his company reached the bridge at Columbus, gallantly led it over, and immediately upon a rebel battery of two guns while completely surrounded by the enemy. And the rank of First Lieutenant by brevet, upon Lloyd H. Dillon, Second Lieutenant Company C, Fourth Iowa cavalry, who has repeatedly acted in the most gallant manner. He was severely wounded at Guntown, June tenth, 1864. At Selma, he led his company, which he was commanding, upon the enemy, killing several with his pistol and sabre. At Columbus he was among the first men to rush upon the enemy, and over the bridge into the city. regiments. killed. wounded. missing. aggregate. Officers. Enlisted men. Total. Officers. Enlisted men. Total. Enlisted men. Total. Third Iowa 1 3 4 2 37 39 3 3 46 Fourth Iowa 1 2 3   22 22     25 Tenth Missouri   1 1   4 4 6 6 11   2 6 8 2 63 65 9 9 82 <
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Appendix no. 2: the work of grace in other armies of the Confederacy. (search)
to camp at Camp Bragg, thirty miles west of Camden, we there commenced our work in earnest. Through the winter of 1863–‘64 we kept up our meetings in camp, had seats and pulpit prepared, and were successful in having more than one hundred conversions. After the battles of Mansfield and Pleasant Hill, in Louisiana, our armies returned to Arkansas and made an encampment at a place called Three Creeks, on the southern line of the State of Arkansas. Here I commenced preaching on the 10th of June, 1864, and continued our meetings until the 10th of September. An extensive revival commenced within a few days after our meeting commenced, and grew in interest and power to the close. We had preaching, beginning at early candle-light—or rather pine-knot fires on stands around the preaching-place. After about ten o'clock at night, the preaching and other exercises at the stand closed; but this was but the beginning of the night's work. As soon as dismissed, the young converts gathered<
nt into camp at Camp Bragg, 30 miles west of Camden, we there commenced our work in earnest. Through the winter of 1863-64 we kept up our meetings in camp, had seats and pulpit prepared, and were successful in having more than one hundred conversions. After the battles of Mansfield and Pleasant Hill, in Louisiana, our armies returned to Arkansas and made an encampment at a place called Three-Creeks, on the southern line of the State of Arkansas. Here I commenced preaching on the 10th of June, 1864, and continued our meetings until the 10th of September. An extensive revival commenced within a few days after our meeting commenced, and grew in interest-and power to the close. We had preaching, beginning at early candle-light-or rather pine-knot fires on stands around the preaching-place. After about ten o'clock at night, the preaching and other exercises at the stand closed; but this was but the beginning of the night's work. As soon as dismissed, the young converts gathered
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 4: the reelection of Lincoln.—1864. (search)
ttentions. Tilton and I went afterwards to see where we could find a room at the principal hotel to occupy, but our application was in vain. Every hotel is more than full. Fortunately for us, Senator Wilson insisted on our coming to his hotel (the Washington), and by his influence got a room for us. We have dined and taken tea with Wilson, who is unremitting in his attentions. To-morrow we shall go to the House of Representatives—to Arlington Heights—etc., etc. . . . Washington, June 10, 1864.Ms. At the White House. I am now at the White House, with Tilton, waiting to have a second interview with the President. He has been receiving, for the last hour, the delegates from the several States that voted for his nomination at the Baltimore Convention. I have no special desire to see him again, except that yesterday he expressed the hope that I would call again; for I know he must be bored with callers. Philadelphia, June 11, 1864. Ms. It is now 3 o'clock P. M. I
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