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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 15 15 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 8 8 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 7 7 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 6 6 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 6 6 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 5 5 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 4 4 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 4 4 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 4 4 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 3 3 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The treatment of prisoners during the war between the States. (search)
rly to cast out the moat out of thy brother's eye. We believe that there are many thousands of just, honorable and humane people in the United States, upon whom this subject, thus presented, will not be lost; that they will do all they can to mitigate the horrors of war; to complete the exchange of prisoners, now happily in progress, and to prevent the recurrence of such sufferings as have been narrated. And we repeat the words of the Confederate Congress, in their manifesto of the 14th of June, 1864: We commit our cause to the enlighted judgment of the world, to the sober reflections of our adversaries themselves, and to the solemn and righteous arbitrament of heaven. Rev. William Brown, D. D., of the Central Presbyterian, writes as follows in his paper: So far as the intentions and orders of the Confederate Government were concerned, no blame can rest upon it. The places selected were healthy, and the food and medicines ordered were the same as those assigned to
e, at Murfreesboro, at Chickamauga, in baffling Sherman in February, 1864, and in General J. E. Johnston's retreat from North Georgia, his courage and skill made him one of the main supports of the Confederate cause in the West. Whoever was at the head, it was upon Polk and Hardee, the corps commanders, as upon two massive pillars, that the weight of organization and discipline rested. General Polk was made a lieutenant-general, October 10, 1862, and was killed by a shell aimed at him, June 14, 1864, near Marietta, Georgia, while boldly reconnoitring the enemy's position. Hon. Thomas C. Reynolds, the constitutional Lieutenant-Governor of Missouri, and, after Governor Jackson's death, its legal Governor, has given the writer his recollections of General Johnston at Columbus. Himself a gentleman of fine talents and culture, Governor Reynolds's opinions and impressions cannot fail to receive consideration: My recollections of your illustrious father are of little or no histor
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 12.92 (search)
manding the maritime district, and to the United States commercial agent, bringing on his return the unanticipated news that Captain Semmes had declared his intention to fight. At first the assertion was barely credited, the policy of the Alabama being regarded as opposed to a conflict, and to escape rather than to be exposed to injury, perhaps destruction; but the doubters were half convinced when the so-called challenge was known to read as follows: C. S. S. Alabama, Cherbourg, June 14th, 1864. To A. Bonfils, Esq., Cherbourg. Sir: I hear that you were informed by the U. S. Consul that the Kearsarge was to come to this port solely for the prisoners landed by me, and that she was to depart in twenty-four hours. I desire you to say to the U. S. Consul that my intention is to fight the Kearsarge as soon as I can make the necessary arrangements. I hope these will not detain me more than until to-morrow evening, or after the morrow morning at furthest. I beg she will not depa
7, 1864 7 Ashby's Gap, Sept. 22, 1862 1 Strawberry Hill, May 12, 1864 3 Columbia Furnace, Oct. 8, 1864 1 Broad Run, April 1, 1863 7 In action, May 30, 1864 1 Mount Olive, Oct. 9, 1864 3 Greenwich, May 30, 1863 1 Ashland, June 1, 1864 3 Kernstown, Nov. 11, 1864 1 Gettysburg, July 3, 1863 17 Salem Church, June 3, 1864 3 Cedar Springs, Nov. 12, 1864 4 Cashtown, July 5, 1863 1 In action, June 12, 1864 1 Waynesboro, Mch. 2, 1865 1 Hagerstown, July 6, 1863 8 White Oak Swamp, June 14, 1864 1 Petersburg, April 3, 1865 2 Boonsboro, July 9, 1863 2 Malvern Hill, June 15, 1864 2 Appomattox, April 8, 1865 1 Culpeper, Sept. 13, 1863 1 Prince Geo. C. H., June 21, 1864 1 Picket, skirmishes, places unknown 8 notes.--Organized at Burlington,. Vt., leaving the State December 14, 1861, with ten companies only; Companies L and M were not recruited until a year later. In the spring of 1862 it was assigned to duty in Banks's Corps, then in the Shenandoah Valley, whereupon it
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 15: operations of the Army of the James around Richmond and Petersburg. (search)
out having any distance to march. What the weariness of the tired men was, and of what they were tired, and their joy in knowing that they were marching to have some works to defend, cannot be better stated than by one of their number, then a private soldier, Frank Wilkeson of the Eleventh New York Battery, who for his gallantry and good conduct was soon after appointed a lieutenant in the regular artillery. He says :-- Recollections of a Private Soldier, p. 153. On the night of June 14, 1864, the battery to which I belonged went into park close to the James River, but not within sight of it. . . . . . . . . . . . . . On the morning of June 15th we moved close to the James River and parked. I was lying under a tree near an old abandoned house. Below me and a little to my left, a pontoon bridge stretched across the muddy waters of the river James. A few steamboats were paddling to and fro, some ferrying troops across the river, others apparently doing nothing. The Seco
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 62.-Hoisting the Black flag — official correspondence and reports. (search)
the onus shall be with the Federal commander. I would like that the onus be put where it properly belongs, before the public, should the extremity arise. The correspondence is not complete yet, and the Department will be informed of the result at the earliest practicable moment. I am, General, yours respectfully, S. D. Lee, Lieutenant-General. General S. Cooper, A. and L G., Richmond, Va. General Forrest to General Washburn. headquarters Forrest's cavalry, in the field, June 14, 1864. Major-General Washburn, commanding United States Forces, Memphis: General: I have the honor herewith to enclose copy of letter received from Brigadier-General Buford, commanding United States forces at Helena, Arkansas, addressed to Colonel E. W. Rucker, commanding Sixth regiment of this command; also a letter from myself to General Buford, which I respectfully request you will read and forward to him. There is a matter also to which I desire to call your attention, which, until
come exposed. Not yet understanding the real state of affairs Meade continued to issue orders to advance. To do so was now beyond human possibility. The men could only renew the fire from the positions they had gained. General Smith received a verbal order from Meade to make another assault, and he flatly refused to obey. It was long past noon, and after Grant was cognizant of the full situation, that The forces at last join hands Charles City Court House on the James River, June 14, 1864. It was with infinite relief that Grant saw the advance of the Army of the Potomac reach this point on June 14th. His last flanking movement was an extremely hazardous one. More than fifty miles intervened between him and Butler by the roads he would have to travel, and he had to cross both the Chickahominy and the James, which were unbridged. The paramount difficulty was to get the Army of the Potomac out of its position before Lee, who confronted it at Cold Harbor. Lee had the sho
come exposed. Not yet understanding the real state of affairs Meade continued to issue orders to advance. To do so was now beyond human possibility. The men could only renew the fire from the positions they had gained. General Smith received a verbal order from Meade to make another assault, and he flatly refused to obey. It was long past noon, and after Grant was cognizant of the full situation, that The forces at last join hands Charles City Court House on the James River, June 14, 1864. It was with infinite relief that Grant saw the advance of the Army of the Potomac reach this point on June 14th. His last flanking movement was an extremely hazardous one. More than fifty miles intervened between him and Butler by the roads he would have to travel, and he had to cross both the Chickahominy and the James, which were unbridged. The paramount difficulty was to get the Army of the Potomac out of its position before Lee, who confronted it at Cold Harbor. Lee had the sho
Johnston from the slopes of the Allatoona Hills. From Kingston, the Federal leader wrote on May 23d, I am already within fifty miles of Atlanta. But he was not to enter that city for many weeks, not before he had measured swords again and again with his great antagonist. On the 25th of May, the two great Lieut.-Gen. Leonidas Polk, C. S. A. The blasted pine rears its gaunt height above the mountain slope, covered with trees slashed down to hold the Federals at bay; and here, on June 14, 1864, the Confederacy lost a commander, a bishop, and a hero. Lieut.-General Leonidas Polk, commanding one of Johnston's army corps, with Johnston himself and Hardee, another corps commander, was studying Sherman's position at a tense moment of the latter's advance around Pine Mountain. The three Confederates stood upon the rolling height, where the center of Johnston's army awaited the Federal attack. They could see the columns in blue pushing east of them; the smoke and rattle of musketr
Johnston from the slopes of the Allatoona Hills. From Kingston, the Federal leader wrote on May 23d, I am already within fifty miles of Atlanta. But he was not to enter that city for many weeks, not before he had measured swords again and again with his great antagonist. On the 25th of May, the two great Lieut.-Gen. Leonidas Polk, C. S. A. The blasted pine rears its gaunt height above the mountain slope, covered with trees slashed down to hold the Federals at bay; and here, on June 14, 1864, the Confederacy lost a commander, a bishop, and a hero. Lieut.-General Leonidas Polk, commanding one of Johnston's army corps, with Johnston himself and Hardee, another corps commander, was studying Sherman's position at a tense moment of the latter's advance around Pine Mountain. The three Confederates stood upon the rolling height, where the center of Johnston's army awaited the Federal attack. They could see the columns in blue pushing east of them; the smoke and rattle of musketr
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