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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 43 43 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 15 15 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 8 8 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 7 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 7 7 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 5 5 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 4 4 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 4 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 3 3 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 2 Browse Search
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terrible fighting which commenced immediately upon their arrival. While at Cold Harbor, these two divisions of the Tenth Corps were known as part of the Eighteenth Corps, forming the Third Division, under command of General Devens. Upon the close of the fighting at Cold Harbor, the two divisions returned by water transports to Bermuda Hundred, but consolidated as the Second Division, Tenth A. C. A division of Ohio troops--hundred-days' men — was attached temporarily to the corps on June 19, 1864, as a Third Division. On the 14th of August, the Tenth Corps, under command of General David B. Birney, crossed the James and became engaged with the enemy at Deep Bottom, General Terry's division taking a prominent part in this action. The casualties in the corps were: 213 killed, 1,154 wounded, 311 missing; total, 1,678. On September 29th, Birney crossed again with his corps, and fought at Chaffin's Farm, his command consisting of Terry's and Ames' divisions, together with a brig
, Va., April 7, 1865 2 Hawes' Shop, Va., May 28, 1864 1 Appomattox, Va., April 9, 1865 7 Cold Harbor, Va., June 2, 1864 2 Picket Duty 2 Skirmish, Va., June 19, 1864 1 Place Unknown 11 notes.--This regiment sustained the heaviest loss, killed in action, of any cavalry regiment in the entire army. Besides the actions icksburg, Va. (1862) 1 Cold Harbor, Va., June 9, 1864 1 Fredericksburg, Va. (1863) 17 Petersburg, Va., June 18, 1864 7 Gettysburg, Pa. 4 Petersburg, Va., June 19, 1864 1 Brandy Station, Va. 1 Petersburg, Va., June 23, 1864 1 Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864 45 Fort Stevens, D. C. 4 Wilderness, Va., May 6, 1864 2 Opequon,129 1,056 157 killed == 14.8 per cent. Total of killed and wounded, 448. battles. K. & M. W. battles. K. & M. W. Shiloh, Tenn. 86 Kenesaw, Ga., June 19, 1864 1 Russell's House, Tenn. 2 Kenesaw, Ga., June 27, 1864 16 Chickasaw Bayou, Miss. 3 Atlanta, Ga., July 22, 1864 6 Arkansas Post, Ark. 1 Ezra Chapel, Ga
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington, Chapter 14: the greatest battles of the war — list of victories and defeats — chronological list of battles with loss in each, Union and Confederate. (search)
7,287 Sept. 19-20, 1863. Chickamauga 1,656 9,749 4,774 16,179 June 1-4, 1864. Cold Harbor 1,844 9,077 1,816 12,737 Dec. 11-14, 1862. Fredericksburg 1,284 9,600 1,769 12,653 Aug. 28-30, 1862. Manassas Including Chantilly, Rappahannock, Bristoe Station, and Bull Run Bridge. 1,747 8,452 4,263 14,462 April 6-7, 1862. Shiloh 1,754 8,408 2,885 13,047 Dec. 31, 1862. Stone's River Including Knob Gap, and losses on January 1st and 2d. 1863. 1,730 7,802 3,717 13,249 June 15-19, 1864. Petersburg (Assault) 1,688 8,513 1,185 11,386 As before, the missing includes the captured; but the number missing at Fredericksburg and Cold Harbor may be fairly added to the killed and wounded, as it represents men who fell in an unsuccessful assault. In connection with these matters the question naturally arises,--Which were victories, and which were defeats? To answer fairly and without prejudice would only invite bitter and senseless criticism from both sides. It is too s
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), IV. Cold Harbor (search)
es that they deemed desperate. Another attack at six resulted no better, save that the lines were at all points pressed close in on those of the enemy. Birney, during the day, made a grand attack with no better success, on the right. I returned after dark, feeling pretty sad. General Meade was much disappointed, but took it cheerfully as he does every matter which affects him personally. The whole thing resulted just as I expected. You cannot strike a full blow with a wounded hand. June 19, 1864 It having been represented to General Meade that there were some wounded and a good many dead between the lines, he determined to send a flag to get a short armistice, as at Cool Arbor. I was again selected, as the man having good clothes, to undertake the mission. This time I determined to have a bugler, and so I did, and very spruce he was, with a German-silver key-bugle. Likewise was there a tall[ sergeant, in Sunday best, with General Seth Williams's new damask tablecloth, on a
United States steamer Kearsarge, Cherbourg, France, afternoon, June 19, 1864. sir: I report the following casualties resulting from the e Cherbourg by the United States steamer Kearsarge, on the nineteenth of June, 1864, do solemnly affirm my sacred word of honor that I will noE. Hartwell, Captain's Clerk. United States steamer Kearsarge, June 19, 1864. We, the undersigned, officers of the late (so-called) confeNavy. United States ship Kearsarge, Port of Cherbourg, France, June 19, 1864. We, the seamen and others, lately belonging to the steamer United States steamer Kearsarge, off this port, on the nineteenth day of June, 1864, now prisoners of war, do hereby solemnly pledge our sacy. United States steamer Kearsarge, Port of Cherbourg, France, June 19, 1864. We, the wounded prisoners of war, late seamen and others on Cherbourg by the United States steamer Kearsarge, on the nineteenth of June, 1864, do solemnly affirm, upon our sacred word of honor, that w
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore), 2. Captain Semmes, C. S. A. N. June 19, 1864. (search)
2. Captain Semmes, C. S. A. N. June 19, 1864. Out of Cherbourg harbor, one clear Sunday morning, the cavalier, Captain Semmes, with his cap a-cock, Sailed from the friendly Frenchman's dock. Gaily along the rebel came, Under the flag of the cross of shame; Knight of the handcuff and bloody lash, He twirled the point of his red moustache, And swore, in English not over nice, To sink our Yankee scum in a trice, Or burn our ship, as the thing might be, Where the eyes of Cherbourg all should see. “Heigh-ho! you don't say so!” Whispered his friend, little Jean Crapeau. Semmes has been a wolf of the deep For many a day to harmless sheep; Ships he scuttled and robbed and burned, Watches pilfered and pockets turned; And all his plunder, bonds, and gold, He left for his Gallic friend to hold. A little over prudent was he For a cavalier of high degree; And Raphael Semmes don't sound, indeed, As if it came of the purple seed; But all the blood in his veins was blue, And his clay was porcelai
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 62.-Hoisting the Black flag — official correspondence and reports. (search)
ommand, I would thank you to inform me, with as little delay as possible, if it is your intention, or the intention of the Confederate government, to murder colored soldiers that may fall into your hands, or treat them as prisoners of war, and subject to be exchanged as other prisoners. I am, General, respectfully, Your obedient servant, C. C. Washburn, Major-General, commanding. General Washburn to General Forrest. headquarters District of West Tennessee, Memphis, Tenn., June 19, 1864. Major-General N. B. Forrest, commanding Confederate Forces: General: Your communication of the fourteenth instant is received. The letter to Brigadier-General Buford will be forwarded to him. In regard to that part of your letter which relates to colored troops, I beg to say that I have already sent a communication on the subject to the officer in command of the Confederate forces at Tupelo. Having understood that Major-General S. D. Lee was in command there, I directed my let
Mo. Cav. Losses: Union, 8 killed, 1 wounded. June 15, 1864: Samaria Church, Malvern Hill, Va. Union, Wilson's Cav.; Confed., Hampton's Cav. Losses: Union, 25 killed, 3 wounded; Confed., 100 killed and wounded. June 15-19, 1864: Petersburg, Va., commencement of the siege that continued to its fall (April 2, 1865). Union, Tenth and Eighteenth Corps, Army of the James, Maj.-Gen. B. F. Butler; Second, Fifth, Sixth, and Ninth Corps, Army of the Potomac, Maj.-Gen. Geo. , Va. Union, Sullivan's and Crook's divisions and Averell's and Duffie's Cav., Army of West Virginia; Confed., Gen. Jubal Early's command. Losses: Union, 100 killed, 500 wounded, 100 missing; Confed., 200 killed and wounded. June 19, 1864: destruction of the Confed. cruiser Alabama, off Cherbourg, France, by U. S. cruiser Kearsarge. Losses: Union, 3 wounded; Confed., 9 killed, 21 wounded, 10 drowned, and 70 captured. June 21, 1864: Salem, Va. Union, Averell's
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The Confederate cruisers and the Alabama : the Confederate destroyers of commerce (search)
r Bahama to join Ship no. 290, built at the Lairds' shipyard, which received her guns and crew on the high seas off the Azores. advantage that was proved completely in the action between the two well-matched vessels when at last they met. June 19, 1864, was the momentous day of the meeting. The Kearsarge had located the Alabama in the harbor of Cherbourg, France, and on the 14th of the month had steamed in and passed out again without anchoring. This was both a challenge and a defiance, ae war captain Winslow and his officers on the Kearsarge Here on the deck of the Kearsarge stand Captain John A. Winslow (third from left) and his officers after their return from the victorious battle with the Alabama. On Sunday morning, June 19, 1864, Captain Winslow, who had been lying off the harbor of Cherbourg waiting for the Confederate cruiser to come out, was conducting divine service. Suddenly a cry--She's coming, and heading straight for us --rang out on the deck. Laying down h
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Naval chronology 1861-1865: important naval engagements of the Civil war March, 1861-June, 1865 (search)
ederates in strong force attacked 3 of Adml. Porter's gunboats on the Red River. May, 1864. May 6, 1864. U. S. gunboat Commodore Jones blown up by Confed. torpedo in James River. May 13, 1864. Adml. Porter's fleet above Alexandria Falls released by Col. Bailey's dam. June, 1864. June 3, 1864. Capture of U. S. S. Water Witch, Lieut.-Comdr. Austin Pendergrast by boat expedition under Lieut. J. P. Pelot, C. S. N., in Ossabaw Sound, Ga., Lieut. Pelot killed. June 19, 1864. The Confed. cruiser Alabama, Capt. Semmes, was sunk off the harbor of Cherbourg, France, by U. S. sloop-of-war Kearsarge, Capt. Winslow. 70 of the Confed. crew were taken on board the Kearsarge, and 115 reached England and France. 3 persons only were wounded on the Kearsarge. The Kickapoo A forerunner of the new navy the Kickapoo on the Mississippi: one of the five river monitors built on Admiral Porter's enthusiastic recommendation, after he had officially examined the or
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