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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 337 337 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 21 21 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 19 19 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 15 15 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 15 15 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 13 13 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 10 10 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 9 9 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 9 9 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 5 5 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of Colonel D. T. Chandler, (search)
r to these just complaints. And I feel a conviction that the truth will one day be vindicated; that, having reference to relative resources, Federal prisoners were more humanely dealt with in Confederate hands than Confederate prisoners were in Federal hands. It was their interest, on a cold-blooded calculation, to stop exchanges when they did it-and as soon as it was their interest, they did it without scruple or mercy. The responsibility of the lives lost at Andersonville rests, since July, 1864, on General Meredith, Commissary-General of Prisoners, and (chiefly) on Edwin M. Stanton, Secretary of War. No one of sound head or heart would now hold the Northern people responsible for these things. The blood is on the skirts of their then rulers; and neither Mr. Garfield nor Mr. Blaine can change the record. I never heard that there was any particular suffering at Libby or Belle Isle, and do not believe there was. Crowded prisons are not comfortable places, as our poor fellows fo
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The treatment of prisoners during the war between the States. (search)
disgusting duty. Towards the end of the war a sewer was made in one of the avenues extending to the river, the prisoners being employed in blasting rock for that purpose. The chief executive officers were a commandant of the post and a provost marshal, the latter having the immediate care and government of the prisoners, assisted by a number of deputies. The parapet was first guarded by a regiment of old men, called Greybeards, afterwards by the 197th Pennsylvania Volunteers, and from July, 1864, by the 108th United States Colored Infantry. The duty of calling the roll of prisoners was performed by several companies of the Fourth Veteran Reserve Corps. These men were soldiers who had seen service in various regiments, and on account of wounds or other disabilities were formed into corps for prison duty. Each barrack was in charge of a prisoner appointed by the provost marshal, called the orderly of the barrack. All orders concerning the prisoners were communicated to these ord
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Fire, sword, and the halter. (search)
mous twenty-eight days campaign, with 13,000 men, against Generals Milroy, Banks, Fremont and Shields, driving them all out of the valley, with their aggregate forces of about 64,000 men. In 1864 the Federal operations were conducted successively by Generals Sigel, Hunter and Sheridan, when that splendid valley was desolated and scourged with fire and sword. It is proposed in this paper merely to give some account of General David Hunter's performances during his brief command in June and July, 1864, of the Federal forces in the Valley, and to lay before the people of this country, and especially of the Northern States, some facts that may explain why here and there are still found traces of bitter feeling in many a household in the South, not against the government of the United States, but against some of the agents and means employed by them in the name of the government, to crown their arms with success. As long as the present race inhabiting that famous and glorious Valley, and
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The burning of Chambersburg. (search)
to explain the reasons why the city of Chambersburg, in Pennsylvania, was destroyed. It may be considered as indispensable to give the location of the forces composing the Union and Confederate armies during the latter part of the month of July, 1864, in order to properly understand the raid that was made into the State of Pennsylvania, and which resulted in the destruction of Chambersburg. Hunter's army (Union) was scattered along the northern bank of the Potomac river, in Maryland, from furnished them. The horses were nearly all worn out, and there was no supply to draw others from. We attempted to get horses in Pennsylvania, but found them removed from the line of march, and we had no time to look for them elsewhere. In July, 1864, the cavalry brigade which I commanded was encamped near the Potomac river, in the county of Berkeley, West Virginia. It made the advance post of the army under General Early, that was guarding the approaches into Virginia through the Shenando
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XL. July, 1864 (search)
XL. July, 1864 Gen. Lee's dispatch announcing Gen. Hampton's victory. cost of a cup of coffee. from Gens. Johnston and S. D. Lee. Gen. Early in Maryland. rumored capture of Baltimore. letter from Gen. Lee. dispatch from Gen. Hood. status of the local troops. July 1 Clear, hot, and dry; my snap beans, corn, etc. burning up. The papers this morning fail to confirm the capture of as many prisoners, near Petersburg, as were reported yesterday. But the dispatch (subjoined) of Gen. Lee renders it certain that the enemy was routed. There is a suspicion that our exasperated men refused quarter to some hundreds of the raiders, on the plea that they ravish, murder, burn, pillage, etc. It may be so. headquarters army of Northern Virginia, June 29th, 1864--8:30 P. M. Hon. Secretary of War. Sir :--Gen. Hampton reports that he attacked the enemy's cavalry yesterday afternoon, on their return from Staunton River bridge, this side of Sappony Church, and drove them be
Francis B. Carpenter, Six Months at the White House, Lx. (search)
Lx. The famous peace conference, on board the River Queen, in Hampton Roads, between President Lincoln and Secretary Seward, and the Rebel commissioners Stephens, Hunter, and Campbell, took place the 3d of February, 1865. A few days afterward My six months proper, at the White House, terminated, as will be seen, the last week in July, 1864. February and a part of March following I passed in Washington, and was privileged with a renewal of my previous intercourse with Mr. Lincoln. I asked the President if it was true, as reported by the New York Herald, that he told a little story on that occasion?--Why, said he, has it leaked out? I was in hopes nothing would be said about that, lest some oversensitive people should imagine there was a degree of levity in the intercourse between us. He then went on to relate the circumstances which called it out. You see, said he, we had reached and were discussing the slavery question. Mr. Hunter said, substantially, that the slaves, alw
Francis B. Carpenter, Six Months at the White House, Lxviii. (search)
How do you do? How do you do? Excuse me for not noticing you. I was thinking of a man down South. He afterward privately acknowledged that the man down South was Sherman, then on his march to the sea. Mr. Lincoln may not have expected death from the hand of an assassin, but he had an impression, amounting to a presentiment, that his life would end with the war. This was expressed not only to Mr. Lovejoy, as stated on a previous page, but to Mrs. Stowe and others. He told me, in July, 1864, says a correspondent of the Boston Journal, that he was certain he should not outlast the rebellion. It was a time of dissension among the Republican leaders. Many of his best friends had deserted him, and were talking of an opposition convention to nominate another candidate; and universal gloom was among the people. The North was tired of the war, and supposed an honorable peace attainable. Mr. Lincoln knew it was not,--that any peace at that time would be only disunion.
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 18 (search)
Government. I have previously mentioned the death of two of my chiefs of artillery, Captains Simonson and McDowell. The place was well and ably filled by Captain Thomasson, First Kentucky Battery. Capt. J. W. Steele, Forty-first Ohio Volunteer Infantry, topographical engineer, rendered good and efficient service, and Captain Greenwood, besides his duty as aide-de-camp, found time to make many of the most accurate maps we possess of the various positions occupied by the army. Appended is a tabular monthly statement of the casualties of the division from the 1st of May to the 31st of July, 1864. All of which is respectfully submitted. D. S. Stanley, Major-General, Commanding First Division. Col. J. S. Fullerton, Assistant Adjutant-General. Inclosure. Consolidated report of casualties of the First Division, Fourth Army Corps, for the months of May, June, and July, 1864. Zzz D. S. Stanley, Major-General, Commanding. Atlanta, Ga., September--, 1864.
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 24 (search)
g in their endeavors to alleviate the sufferings of the wounded. To my staff-Capt. H. F. Temple, acting assistant adjutant-general; Capt. John North, inspector-general; Lieut. J. C. Peck, aidede-camp; Lieut. G. W. Pepoon, provost-marshal, and Lieut. J. R. Dean, controlling ambulances-my acknowledgments are due for their faithfulness and efficiency in the discharge of their manifold duties. They have been tried on many a field and their gallantry and fearlessness well attested. Very respectfully, J. E. Taylor, Colonel, Commanding Brigade. Capt. E. D. Imason, Asst. Adjt. Gen., First Division, Fourth Army Corps. Inclosure no. 1. List of prisoners captured by the Second brigade, First Division, Fourth Army Corps, during the months of July and August, 1864. Zzz Inclosure no. 2. Report of casualties in Second brigade, First Division, Fourth Army Corps, from July 1, 1864, to September 9, 1864. Zzz J. E. Taylor, Colonel, Commanding Brigade.
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 111 (search)
ed men wounded. July 4, the detachment supported two batteries under a destructively severe artillery fire from the enemy; also charged rebel line of skirmishers, and drove them, thus causing, or materially aiding in causing, the whole rebel line to evacuate its position during the ensuing night. July 20, the detachment in the battle of Peach Tree Creek was under musketry fire, also subjected to severe shelling. July 22, intrenched within one and a half miles of Atlanta, Ga. Loss during July, 1864: Commissioned officers-wounded, 3. Enlisted menkilled, 1; wounded, 21; missing, 1. Total, 26. August 3, the detachment deployed as skirmishers and drove the enemy's cavalry vedettes and pickets. August 7, the detachment assaulted the enemy's line of rifle-pits; the detachment of the Fifteenth U. S. Infantry and Eleventh Michigan Volunteer Infantry supported detachment Eighteenth U. S. Infantry and very soon connected with it on its right, the whole being under my command as senior o
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