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The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 2 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 2 2 Browse Search
Francis B. Carpenter, Six Months at the White House 2 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 2 2 Browse Search
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 2 Browse Search
L. P. Brockett, Women's work in the civil war: a record of heroism, patriotism and patience 2 2 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 2 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 2 2 Browse Search
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ope of Lee's beleaguered army. Fort McGilvery was less than one-half a mile from the Appomattox River, just north of the city Point Railroad, at the extreme right of the Federal line. It was one of the earliest forts completed, being built in July, 1864. Fort Morton, named after Major St. Clair Morton, killed by a sharpshooter's bullet in July, 1864, was renowned as the place from which the mine was dug and from which the disastrous attempt to break through the Confederate lines was made on JuJuly, 1864, was renowned as the place from which the mine was dug and from which the disastrous attempt to break through the Confederate lines was made on July 30th. Fort Morton lay almost in the center of the most active portion of the lines, and was about a mile south of Fort Stedman. Where Gordon's men attacked, Fort Stedman The powder magazine at Fort McGilvery Fort Morton, opposite the crater Siege of Petersburg. almost every one of the forts in the long Federal line was named after some gallant officer who had lost his life in action. They might have been termed the memorial forts. The almost circular entrenchment, strengt
ope of Lee's beleaguered army. Fort McGilvery was less than one-half a mile from the Appomattox River, just north of the city Point Railroad, at the extreme right of the Federal line. It was one of the earliest forts completed, being built in July, 1864. Fort Morton, named after Major St. Clair Morton, killed by a sharpshooter's bullet in July, 1864, was renowned as the place from which the mine was dug and from which the disastrous attempt to break through the Confederate lines was made on JuJuly, 1864, was renowned as the place from which the mine was dug and from which the disastrous attempt to break through the Confederate lines was made on July 30th. Fort Morton lay almost in the center of the most active portion of the lines, and was about a mile south of Fort Stedman. Where Gordon's men attacked, Fort Stedman The powder magazine at Fort McGilvery Fort Morton, opposite the crater Siege of Petersburg. almost every one of the forts in the long Federal line was named after some gallant officer who had lost his life in action. They might have been termed the memorial forts. The almost circular entrenchment, strengt
he Federal navy concentrated against the fortifications of this port the most powerful naval force ever assembled up to that time--fifty-five ships of war, including five ironclads, altogether carrying six hundred guns. The upper picture shows the nature of the palisade, nine feet high,. over which some two thousand marines attempted to pass; the lower shows interior of the works after the destructive bombardment. The last Port closed Inside Fort Fisher--work of the Union fleet July, 1864. July 1-31, 1864: in front of Petersburg, including deep bottom, New Market, and Malvern Hill, on the 27th, and Federal mine explosion on the 30th under a Confederate fort. Union, Second, Fifth, Ninth, Tenth, and Eighteenth Corps; Confed., Army of Northern Virginia. Losses: Union, 853 killed, 3468 wounded, 1558 missing; Confed. No record found. July 2-5, 1864: Nickajack Creek or Smyrna, Ga. Union, troops under command of Maj.-Gen. Sherman; Confed., Gen. Johnston'
on. They bore themselves nobly. Many of the severest casualties during the war were sustained by the heavy artillerists in the Wilderness campaign and at Petersburg. A light battery that fought before Petersburg — the 17th New York The Seventeenth Independent Battery of New York Light Artillery, known as the Orleans Battery, was organized at Lockport, New York, and mustered in August 26, 1862. It remained in the artillery Camp of instruction and in the defenses of Washington until July, 1864, when it was ordered to Petersburg. It took part in the pursuit of Lee, and was present at Appomattox. Confederates to seize the Landing and cut off Buell's army from crossing to Grant's assistance. At the battle of Murfreesboro, or Stone's River, the artillery was especially well handled by the Federals, although they lost twenty-eight guns. On the second day, the Confederates made a determined assault to dislodge the Federals from the east bank of the river. The infantry assau
few more shovelfulls of earth meant the saving of lives. The veterans in the lower photograph are bearded and bronzed; the muscles beneath their shabby blue tunics were developed by heavy, constant manual labor. The operations in this campaign marked a development in field-fortifications, opened virtually a new era in warfare. The siege was not a bombardment of impregnable fortifications. It was a constant series of assaults and picket-firing on lines of entrenchments in the open. By July, 1864, the earthworks to the east had been almost finished, although much of this exacting labor had been performed at night and under a galling fire. During August, the engineer corps extended the lines south and southeast of the beleaguered city. But meanwhile the Confederates had been hard at work also. They had fewer men to hold their lines and to carry on the work, but it was accomplished with great devotion, and under able management and direction. The soldiers in the trenches lived in
officers of the army who had made a scientific study of this new means of communication, and the result was a benefit to the roads and the Government. They knew the construction corps was doing its duty : Camp of the corps at city Point in July, 1864 The construction corps of the United States Military Railroads had a comparatively easy time at City Point under General McCallum. There was plenty of hard work, but it was not under fire, and so expert had they become that the laying of tre Railroad bridges. Underneath this picture of the army trestle (seen from down-stream on the second page preceding) is reproduced a panoramic view of the Chattahoochie Bridge — the most marvelous feat of military engineering to date (July, 1864). It was 800 feet long, nearly 100 feet high, and contained about twice as much timber as was required for the beanpole and cornstalk bridge, shown on page 272. It was completed in four and a half days, from the material in the tree to the fini
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Introduction — the Federal Navy and the blockade (search)
l at manning yards that is pictured here shows that in Civil War times the Brazilians, never a maritime nation, had much to learn. Occasionally during the war, along the South Atlantic coast, while the blockade was still in existence and rigidly enforced, strange vessels would be seen by the cordon of outlying scouts, and more than once mistakes were narrowly averted. It was hard to tell under what guise a blockade-runner might approach the starting-line for the final dash for shore. In July, 1864, late one evening, a vessel was seen approaching and her actions were so peculiar that a little gunboat started at once for the guard-ships and made report. Two vessels were despatched to intercept the stranger. There was a slight fog and the moon was bright, a combination that made it impossible to see more than a few yards ahead. All at once the mist lifted, and there — lying within half pistol-shot between the two Federal cruisers — lay the suspected one. Immediately she was hailed
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Naval actions along the shore (search)
e power was furnished by the crew, who, sitting vis-à--vis on benches, turned a crank The U. S.S. Mendota. From the time General Grant established his headquarters at City Point, there was no rest for the gunboats in the James River. There was an active and determined foe to contend with, and alertness was the watchword for every officer and man in the Federal flotilla. Underneath, one of the huge 100-pounder Parrott guns is being brought into position on the gunboat Mendota in July, 1864, ready to be trained upon the Confederates whenever they attempted to plant batteries along the shores. The work of the Mendota's gunners on July 28th at Four Mile Creek spoke eloquently of their coolness and accuracy of aim. With equal smartness, and scarcely more excitement than is apparent in the picture above, they served their guns under fire of shot and shell. The U. S.S. Mendota. Constant preparedness on the Mendota 1864: looking along the 100-lb Parrott gun connecting wi
howing the whole prison, which takes in an area of forty acres. Early in the war a rendezvous Camp had been established at Elmira, New York. After exchange of prisoners ceased in 1863, though battles continued to be fought, the number of Confederate prisoners increased very rapidly and further accommodation was necessary. These barracks were chosen to serve as a prison in May, 1864. The first detachment of Confederate prisoners arrived there July 6th, 649 in number. During the month of July, 1864, 4,424 more were brought; during August, 5,195; and from September 1, 1864, to May 12, 1865, 2,503 additional, making a total of 12,122 prisoners of war. For a considerable time a large proportion of these were accommodated in tents, though barracks were completed in the early part of the winter. The site of the prison was badly chosen; it was below the level of the Chemung River, and a lagoon of stagnant water caused much sickness. The severity of the winter also brought much suffering
In all there were about forty of these lodges. The convalescent camp, at Alexandria, Virginia, intended for the care of those soldiers discharged from the hospitals but not yet able to resume their places in the ranks, was a special charge of the Commission, though not directly under its control. Other camps were established at Memphis, Cairo, and various other points in the West. Some of these rest-lodges are shown above. A hospital at new Berne, N. C. Lodge no. 5 at Washington, July, 1864 A lodge for invalid soldiers Tents at Belle Plain by committees of eminent medical men were distributed to the regimental surgeons and the commanding officers. Since these surgeons had been almost wholly drawn from civil life and as the Medical Department had not issued any such treatises to them, these little books were of inestimable value. The ideas of the members of the commission, which included some of the best-known physicians in the country as well as men of affairs, wer
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