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Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 1 1 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 13, 1865., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Stanley, David Sloan 1828- (search)
David Sloan 1828- Military officer; born in Cedar Valley, O., June 1, 1828; graduated at West Point in 1852, entering the dragoon service. When the Civil War began he brought off the government property from the forts in the Southwest, and performed good service in Missouri, especially at Dug Springs and Wilson's Creek. After performing signal service in Mississippi, he became chief of cavalry in the Army of the Cumberland late in 1862, and displayed great skill in the battle of Stone River (q. v.), and afterwards in driving Bragg into Georgia. Late in 1863 he commanded a division of the 4th Corps. He was in the Atlanta campaign, and commanded the 4th Corps from July, 1864, to the close of the war. By his arrival on the battlefield at Franklin he averted serious disaster, but was wounded and disabled. He bad been made major-general of volunteers in November, 1862, and in March, 1865, was brevetted major-general, United States army. He was retired as brigadiergeneral in 1892.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Stoneman, George 1822-1894 (search)
f General Kearny, at Chantilly, he took command of that general's division. Gen. George Stoneman. He succeeded General Heintzelman as commander of the 3d Army Corps, which he led in the battle of Fredericksburg, and was promoted to major-general in November, 1862. In the Richmond campaign, in May, 1863, he commanded a cavalry corps on raids; and from January to April, 1864, he led the 23d Corps. Then he was transferred to the command of the cavalry in the Department of the Ohio. In July, 1864, General Sherman ordered General Stoneman, at Atlanta, to take his own and Garrard's cavalry, about 5,000 in all, and move by the left, around Atlanta, to Macdonough, while McCook was to move by the right to Fayetteville, and, sweeping round, join the latter at Lovejoy's Station, on the Macon Railway. He moved on the night of July 28. Stoneman, ambitious, tried to do too much, and failed in nearly all his undertakings on that raid. He obtained consent to go farther than Lovejoy's, after
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Torbet, Alfred Thomas Archimedes 1833- (search)
Torbet, Alfred Thomas Archimedes 1833- Military officer; born in Georgetown, Del., July 1, 1833; graduated at West Point in 1855, serving in Florida in 1856-57. He became colonel of the 1st New Jersey Volunteers in September, 1861, and was active in the Peninsular campaign. He commanded a brigade in the battles of Groveton, or second battle of Bull Run, South Mountain (where he was wounded), and Antietam. In November, 1862, he was promoted brigadier-general of volunteers; was engaged at Gettysburg; and commanded a division of cavalry in the Army of the Potomac from May to July, 1864. He was chief of cavalry in the Shenandoah campaign from August to October, 1864. and was brevetted major-general, United States army, in March, 1865. He resigned in October, 1866, and in 1871 was sent as consul-general to Havana. He was drowned in the wreck of the steamer Vera Cruz off the coast of Florida, Sept. 30, 1880.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wheeler, Joseph 1836- (search)
s pursuers at his heels, doing all the mischief in his Joseph Wheeler. power. At Farmington, below the Duck River, Crook struck him, cut his force in two, captured four of his guns and 1,000 small-arms, with 200 of his men, besides his wounded, and drove him in confusion into northern Alabama. Wheeler made his way back to Bragg's army, with a loss of 2,000 men, but had captured nearly as many and destroyed National property of the value, probably, of $3,000,000. Towards the close of July, 1864, Hood, commanding the Confederates at Atlanta, sent Wheeler, with the greater part of his cavalry, to capture National supplies, burn bridges, and break up railways in Sherman's rear. He moved swiftly, with about 8,000 horsemen. He struck and broke the railway at Calhoun, captured 900 horses in that vicinity, and seriously menaced Sherman's depot of supplies at Allatoona, in the middle of August. This was at the time when Sherman was about to make his movement to flank Hood out of Atlan
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wright, Horatio Gouverneur 1820-1899 (search)
at the battle of Bull Run, and in Horatio Gouverneur Wright. the Port Royal expedition he commanded a brigade. In February, 1862, he was in the expedition that captured Fernandina, Fla., and commanded a division in the attack on Secessionville, S. C., in June, 1862. In July he was assigned to the Department of the Ohio, and commanded the 1st Division, 6th Corps, in the Army of the Potomac at Gettysburg. After General Sedgwick's death he was in command of the 6th Corps, which he led in the Richmond campaign until July, 1864, when he was sent to the defence of the national capital, and afterwards (August to December) was engaged in the Shenandoah campaign. He was wounded in the battle of Cedar Creek; was in the final military operations which ended with the surrender of Lee. He was brevetted major-general, United States army, in March, 1865; promoted brigadier-general and chief of engineers June 30, 1879; and was retired March 6, 1884. He died in Washington, D. C., July 2, 1899.
tment, and then ordered General Hardee to evacuate at once. This is the first error noticeable in Mr. Davis's amended account of that event. Another is his omission to state that, because of General Hardee's ill-health and absence at the time, it was General McLaws who commanded the troops at the evacuation. His third error is the mention he makes of Colonel Stephen Elliott, Jr., as the gallant commander of that fort, intimating thereby, and leading the reader to believe, that, prior to July, 1864, when Captain Huguenin was sent there, no other officer than Colonel Elliott had been in command of Fort Sumter. The reader is aware that, after Colonel Rhett had defended the fort for a prolonged period, he was withdrawn from that work, to take charge of the city defences; and that Fort Sumter was afterwards commanded—first by Major Elliott; second, by Captain Mitchell, who fell at his post; and third, by Captain Huguenin, one of the gallant officers of the 1st South Carolina Infantry (R
1862 1.50 September, 1862 2.00 October, 1862 2.00 November, 1862 2.50 December, 1862 2.50 January, 1863 3.00 February, 1863 3.00 March, 1863 4.00 April, 1863 5.00 May, 1863 1.50 June, 1863 6.50 July, 1863 9.00 August, 1863$14.00 b. par. September, 1863$14.00 October, 1863 14.00 November, 1863 15.00 December, 1863 20.00 January, 1864 21.00 February, 1864 21.00 March, 1864 23.00 April, 1864 20.00 May, 1864 19.00 June, 1864 10.00 July, 1864 21.00 August, 1864 23.00 September, 186425.00 October, 1864 26.00 November, 1864 39.00 December, 1864 49.00 January, 1865 50.00 February, 1865 56.00 March, 1865 60.00 April, 1865 100.00 The administration relied mainly on the issue of Treasury notes and call certificates, which it could not redeem, and then on the compulsory funding of these in bonds. The result of this financiering was constant embarrassment, followed by a steady decline of credit. Only $11,0
bell Col. 54th Penn. Infantry  Campbell's separate Brigade, Department of West Virginia Col. 54th Penn. InfantryApr. 2, 1864, to Apr. 14, 1864. 1st Brigade, 2d Division, 1st Division, Department of West Virginia Col. 54th Penn. InfantryJuly, 1864, to Aug., 1864. 3d Brigade, 1st Infantry Division, 1st Division, Department of West Virginia Col. 54th Penn. InfantryJune 9, 1864, to July , 1864. 3d Brigade, 2d Infantry Division, 1st Division, Department of West Virginia Col. 54th Penn. Inf Penn. InfantryApr. 2, 1864, to Apr. 14, 1864. 1st Brigade, 2d Division, 1st Division, Department of West Virginia Col. 54th Penn. InfantryJuly, 1864, to Aug., 1864. 3d Brigade, 1st Infantry Division, 1st Division, Department of West Virginia Col. 54th Penn. InfantryJune 9, 1864, to July , 1864. 3d Brigade, 2d Infantry Division, 1st Division, Department of West Virginia Col. 54th Penn. InfantryMarch 27, 1863, to June 26, 1863. 4th Brigade, 1st Division, Eighth Army Corps, Middle Dep
Thomas M. Harris Bvt. Brigadier GeneralApr. 27, 1865, to July 10, 1865. Independent Division, Twenty-Fourth Army Corps, Army of the James Bvt. Brigadier GeneralDec. 24, 1864, to March 25, 1865. Independent Division, Twenty-Fourth Army Corps, Army of the James Bvt. Brigadier GeneralMarch 25, 1865, to Apr. 27, 1865. 3d Brigade, Independent Division, Twenty-Fourth Army Corps, Army of the James Col. 10th W. Va. InfantryTemporarily. Cheat Mountain District, Mountain Department Col. 10th West Va. InfantryAug., 1864, to Oct. 19, 1864. 3d Brigade, 1st Infantry Division, 1st Division, Department of West Virginia Col. 10th West Va. InfantryJuly, 1864. 1st Brigade, 3d Division, 1st Division, Department of West Virginia Col. 10th West Va. InfantryOct. 19, 1864, to Dec. 24, 1864. 1st Infantry Division, 1st Division, Department of West Vir
W. H. Hayward Col. 150th Ohio InfantryJuly, 1864, to Aug., 1864. 2d Brigade, Defenses North of the Potomac, 11th and 20th U. S. Reserve Corps, Department of Washington Col. 150th Ohio InfantryMay 12, 1864, to July 6, 1864. 1st Brigade, Defenses North of the Potomac, 11th and 20th U. S. Reserve Corps, Department of Washington
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