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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 45 45 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 38 38 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 12 12 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 7 7 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6 6 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 5 5 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 17, 1864., [Electronic resource] 4 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 4 Browse Search
Edward H. Savage, author of Police Recollections; Or Boston by Daylight and Gas-Light ., Boston events: a brief mention and the date of more than 5,000 events that transpired in Boston from 1630 to 1880, covering a period of 250 years, together with other occurrences of interest, arranged in alphabetical order 4 4 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 4 4 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Diary of Robert E. Park, Macon, Georgia, late Captain Twelfth Alabama regiment, Confederate States army. (search)
t will be a very daring movement, but all are ready and anxious for it. My own idea has long been that we should transfer the battle-ground to the enemy's territory, and let them feel some of the dire calamities of war. June 30th Returned to the turnpike and marched eighteen miles, half mile beyond New Market. This place was the scene of the Dutch General Siegel's signal defeat by General Breckinridge. The men who fit mit Siegels preferred running to fighting on that occasion. July 1st, 1864 Marched twenty-two miles to-day — from Newmarket to two miles beyond Woodstock, where we remained for the night. This is the anniversary of the first day's battle at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania; and one year ago, late in the afternoon, just before my brigade entered the city, I was wounded. I well remember the severe wound in the head received that day by Lieutenant Wright near my side, and his earnest appeal to me to tell him candidly the nature of his terrible wound. And I shall nev
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Organization of the two governments. (search)
resident: Abraham Lincoln (Ill.) Vice-President: Hannibal Hamlin (Maine). Department of State. Secretary of State: William H. Seward (New York). War Department. Secretary of War: Simon Cameron (Pa.) Secretary of War: Edwin M. Stanton (Pa.), appointed Jan. 15, 1862. Navy Department. Secretary of the Navy: Gideon Welles (Conn.) Treasury Department. Secretary of the Treasury: Salmon P. Chase (Ohio) Secretary of the Treasury: W. P. Fessenden (Maine), appointed July 1, 1864 Secretary of the Treasury: Hugh McCulloch (Ind.), appointed March 7, 1865. Interior Department. Secretary of the Interior: Caleb B. Smith (Ind.) Secretary of the Interior: John P. Usher (Ind.), appointed January 8, 1863. Department of justice. Attorney-General: Edward Bates (Mo.) Attorney-General: James Speed (Ky.), appointed Dec. 2, 1864. Post-office. Postmaster-General: Montgomery Blair (Md.) Postmaster-General: William Dennison (Ohio), appointed September
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 10 (search)
intendence during the year ending June 30, 1865 : This report will naturally be divided into four parts, viz: First. The Atlanta campaign, from the 1st of July, 1864, to the occupation of the city, September 2, 1864. Second. The new defenses of Atlanta and the Savannah campaign, including the time from the 3d of Septabors of the engineers were directed to facilitate these movements, and always with a distinct idea of their object. First. The Atlanta campaign, from the 1st of July, 1864, to the occupation of the city, September 2, 1864. On the 1st of July, 1864, I was on duty as chief engineer with the army commanded by Maj. Gen. W. T. S1st of July, 1864, I was on duty as chief engineer with the army commanded by Maj. Gen. W. T. Sherman, then before Kenesaw Mountain, a position to which I had been assigned by Special Field Orders, No. 1, headquarters Military Division of the Mississippi, dated Chattanooga, Tenn., May 3, 1864. At that time the engineer organization for the army in the field was altogether inadequate. There were within the limits of the mi
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 24 (search)
g in their endeavors to alleviate the sufferings of the wounded. To my staff-Capt. H. F. Temple, acting assistant adjutant-general; Capt. John North, inspector-general; Lieut. J. C. Peck, aidede-camp; Lieut. G. W. Pepoon, provost-marshal, and Lieut. J. R. Dean, controlling ambulances-my acknowledgments are due for their faithfulness and efficiency in the discharge of their manifold duties. They have been tried on many a field and their gallantry and fearlessness well attested. Very respectfully, J. E. Taylor, Colonel, Commanding Brigade. Capt. E. D. Imason, Asst. Adjt. Gen., First Division, Fourth Army Corps. Inclosure no. 1. List of prisoners captured by the Second brigade, First Division, Fourth Army Corps, during the months of July and August, 1864. Zzz Inclosure no. 2. Report of casualties in Second brigade, First Division, Fourth Army Corps, from July 1, 1864, to September 9, 1864. Zzz J. E. Taylor, Colonel, Commanding Brigade.
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 26 (search)
No. 22. report of Lieut. Col. Augustus G. Tassin, Thirty-fifth Indiana Infantry, of operations July I-September 8. Hdqrs. Thirty-Fifth Indiana Volunteers, Atlanta, Ga., September 10, 1864. Captain: In compliance with circular of September 10, I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of the Thirty-fifth Regiment Indiana Infantry Volunteers during the recent campaign, from July 1, 1864, to the fall of Atlanta: On July 1 the regiment was stationed in front of Kenesaw Mountain, Ga., occupying a reserve position in rear of the second line of our works. On the evening of the 2d the regiment changed position to the left with the brigade, taking the place of the Second Division, Fourth Corps, which moved out. The following morning, the enemy having evacuated their position on Kenesaw Mountain, the regiment took the line of march in pursuit, passing through Marietta, coming up again with the enemy about four miles south of that place. Here the brigade w
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 47 (search)
h Army Corps. Hdqrs. Second Brig., Second Div., 4TH Army Corps, In the Field, near Marietta, Ga., June 25, 1864. Captain: I have the honor to submit the following report of casualties in my command from June 4 to June 24, inclusive: Zzz Very respectfully, G. D. Wagner, Brigadier-General, Commanding. Capt. J. S. Ransom, Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen., Second Div., 4th Army Corps. Hdqrs. Second Brig., Second Div., 4TH Army Corps, In the Field, near Kenesaw Mountain, Ga., July 1, 1864. Captain : I have the honor to forward the following as the report of casualties of my command for the month of June: Zzz Very respectfully, your obedient servant, G. D. Wagner, Brigadier-General, Commanding. Capt. James S. Ransom, Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen., Second Div., 4th Army Corps, Hdqrs. Second Brig., Second Div., 4TH Army Corps, Near Atlanta, Ga., September 17, 1864. Captain: I have the honor to forward the following as the report of the casualties of my command f
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 182 (search)
eneral Newton to relieve General Wood and to hold the line, his right resting at Sutermeister's battery, his left at Dilger's, and General Wood to relieve General King's division, of the Fourteenth Corps, his right to rest at Dilger's battery, his left on the Dallas and Marietta road. 3 p. m., received orders from department headquarters to be ready to move at a moment's warning. At same time received Special Field Orders, No. 31, headquarters Military Division of the Mississippi, dated July 1, 1864, as follows : For full text of orders (here omitted) see Part V. The usual picket-firing through the day. The day very hot. 11.30 p. m., received a note from department headquarters stating that there is reason to believe that the enemy intends to withdraw tonight, and General Thomas directs General Howard to feel the enemy at some point of his line between now and midnight, and also in the morning, for the purpose of ascertaining whether he has done so; that it will not do to attempt a
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 4.14 (search)
on the list for promotion to the rank of major-general. he is possessed of one of the clearest military heads in the army — is very practical and industrious — no man in the service is better qualified than he for our largest commands. On July 1st, 1864, General Grant, from City Point, Virginia, addressed a letter to General Halleck, chief-of-staff, from which the following extracts are taken: Mr. Dana, Assistant Secretary of War, has just returned. He informs me that he called attentiosent command unless it was to increase it, but, as I say, I may have to do it if General Butler remains. . . . I would feel strengthened with Smith, Franklin, or J. J. Reynolds commanding the right wing of this army. . . . So that on the 1st of July, 1864, General Grant thought he would be strengthened with General Smith commanding the right wing of that army. On the strength of that letter I was placed in command of the troops in the field belonging to the Army of the James, and General But
R. Brewster, was assigned to Mott's Division, and from that time fought with the Second Corps until the expiration of its term of service. It was mustered out July 1, 1864, and the recruits transferred to the Eighty-sixth New York. Seventy-Second New York Infantry--Third Excelsior. Sickles's Brigade — Hooker's Division--T Farm, Va. 3 Campbell's Station, Tenn. 6 Boydton Road, Va. 1 Knoxville, Tenn. 28 Fort Stedman, Va. 5 On Picket, Tenn., Nov. 25, 1863 1 On Picket, Va., July 1, 1864; July 27, 1864 2 Present, also, at Blackburn's Ford; First Bull Run; Siege of Vicksburg; Blue Springs, Tenn.; Lenoir, Tenn.; Totopotomoy; Cold Harbor; Re, Tenn. 41 Ezra Chapel, Ga. 3 Corinth, Miss. 22 Siege of Atlanta, Ga. 7 Vicksburg, Miss. 2 Sherman's March 1 Kenesaw, Ga. 6 Savannah, Ga. 1 Picket, July 1, 1864 1 Pocotaligo, S. C. 1 Nickajack Creek, Ga. 4 Congaree Creek, S. C. 2 Atlanta, Ga., July 21, 1864 10 Bentonville, N. C. 2 Atlanta, Ga., July 22, 1864 2
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), IV. Cold Harbor (search)
or hastily cut with a knife. I recollect sitting on the high bank of the Rapid Ann, at Germanna Ford, and watching the 5th and 6th Corps as they marched up from the pontoon bridges; and I remember thinking how strange it would be if each man who was destined to fall in the campaign had some large badge on! There would have been Generals Sedgwick, Wadsworth, and Rice, and what crowds of subordinate officers and of privates, all marching gaily along, unconscious, happily, of their fate. July 1, 1864 Nothing very new to-day. I took advantage of the propinquity of the nigger division (which had come to fill part of the 6th Corps' line, during its absence) to show the unbleached brethren to my Imperial commissioners. We rode first to General Ferrero's Headquarters. This officer, as his name hints, is an Italian by birth, his papa being of Milan. He is quite a well-looking man, and, like unto General Carr, was a dancing-master before he took to soldiering. He speaks Italian and s
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