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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 182 (search)
re front, on or very near to the river-bank. Baird, commanding one of Palmer's divisions, connects with us on our right, and McCook's cavalry is moving up to connect our left with Garrard's cavalry. He will be up by 5 or 6 p. m. 3 p. m., General Thomas requested General Howard to try and get over the river in the morning. 3.30, reconnoitered for the purpose of finding ground to place our artillery on so it may assist us in crossing in the morning. 6.30, published order for the day for July 6, 1864. General Wood to try at 5 a. m., to effect a crossing at Pace's Ferry, where the enemy crossed on the pontoon bridge to-day, and if he could not cross there to cross at such point as he may select, on a pontoon bridge to be furnished him; the artillery of the First and Second Divisions to co-operate with his in this movement. 9.20, reported to General Thomas the transactions of the day, and requested him to send the pontoon train to these headquarters by 5 a. m. to-morrow. Day excessive
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 13: invasion of Maryland and Pennsylvania-operations before Petersburg and in the Shenandoah Valley. (search)
D., who was an eye-witness. both bitter Maryland rebels, who now, as the chosen guides and assistants of the chief of the invaders, brought war with all its horrors to the doors of their neighbors and friends. Early pushed on to Hagerstown, July 6, 1864. where he levied a contribution on the inhabitants of $20,000, and then swept over the country toward the Pennsylvania line, plundering friend and foe alike of horses, cattle, provisions and money. This invasion produced great alarm, and can of cavalry, two hundred and fifty strong, and four companies of the First (Maryland) Potomac Home Brigade, about two hundred in number, under Captain Brown. The Eleventh Maryland and all the Ohio troops were hundred days men. That night, July 6, 1864. Wallace ordered Colonel Clendennin to go out toward Middletown with four hundred men, in search of positive information concerning the Confederates. He marched at daylight, July 7. with a section of Alexanders' artillery, and at that villag
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., chapter 48 (search)
d, carrying many persons with her. It affords me great gratification to announce to the Department that every officer and man did their duty — exhibiting a degree of coolness and fortitude which gave promise at the outset of certain victory. I have the honor to be, most respectfully, your obedient servant, John A. Winslow, Captain. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. To this dispatch the Secretary of the Navy responded as follows: Navy Department, July 6, 1864. Sir — Your very brief dispatches of the 19th and 20th ultimo, informing the Department that the piratical craft Alabama, or 290, had been sunk on the 19th of June near meridian, by the Kearsarge, under your command, were this day received. I congratulate you on your good fortune in meeting this vessel, which had so long avoided the fastest ships and some of the most vigilant and intelligent officers of the service; and for the ability displayed in this combat you have the thanks of t
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 59: (search)
er. Steamer Kaskaskia 1,300 00 376 55 923 45 Springfield Jan. 11, 1864 Cricket. Steamer Kate 31,180 00 1,890 42 29,289 58 New York Feb. 16, 1864 Mount Vernon, Iroquois, James Adger, Niphon. Sloop Kate 3,572 22 442 22 3,130 00 Key West July 6, 1864 Brooklyn. Sloop Kate Waiting for prize list of the Pursuit. 711 81 126 27 585 54 do   Pursuit. Schooner La Criolla 2,828 64 871 83 1,956 81 Philadelphia Nov. 26, 1862 Bienville. Steamer Lodona 246,651 32 14,944 84 231,706 48 do Apranandaigua, New Ironsides, Powhatan, Wamsutta, Paul Jones, Lodona, Housatonic, Huron, Unadilla, Para, Stettin, Augusta. Schooner Southern Rights 554 24 133 53 420 71 Key West April 12, 1864 Sagamore. Schooner Star 800 00 168 51 631 49 do July 6, 1864 Brooklyn. Steamer Stettin 226,393 10 23,921 68 202,471 42 New York Mar. 22, 1864 Bienville.   Sugar, 13 bbls.; 1 bbl. molasses 457 29 84 81 372 48 Key West Feb. 29, 1864 Tahoma. Sloop Surprise 71,117 16 5,067 39 66,049 77 do Feb. 29,
Ogeechee River Siege of Savannah Combahee River Pocataligo River's Bridge Edisto River Orangeburg Cheraw Fayetteville Bentonville Benton; Second, or Red River Division. Vaughn's Station; Second, or Red River Division. Jackson (July 6, 1864); Second, or Red River Division. Fort De Russy; Second, or Red River Division. Cloutiersville; Second, or Red River Division. Cane River; Second, or Red River Division. marks ville; Second, or Red River Division. Bayou De Gal, or as the Red River Division of the Seventeenth Corps. It was commanded by General T. K. Smith. Parts of this division served, also, on McArthur's Yazoo City Expedition, May 4-13, 1864, and on General Slocum's Expedition to Jackson, July 5-6, 1864. A few regiments were engaged, also, under Sturgis, at Brice's Cross Roads, and in General A. J. Smith's Expedition to Tupelo. The fighting in some of these campaigns was severe on certain regiments. In November, 1864, the Red River Divisio
, 1864, the entire division was transferred to the Sixth Corps, the regiment becoming a part of the Second Brigade (Col. B. F. Smith's). Upon its transfer to the Sixth Corps, the division was placed under the command of General Ricketts. Colonel Howard resigned May 5, 1863, and was succeeded by Colonel Horn, who resigned in February, 1865. The Sixth fought with signal gallantry in the battles of the Wilderness and Cold Harbor, its losses in the former action being unusually severe. On July 6, 1864, the division was ordered on transports at City Point, Va., and sailed for Baltimore to meet Early's invasion of Maryland. Owing to delay in transportation, the regiment did not arrive in time to participate in the battle of the Monocacy, but in time to cover the retreat of Ricketts's Division. General Ricketts was wounded at Cedar Creek, and was succeeded by General Seymour The regiment did some good fighting in the Valley, and, also, in the final battles of the war. It was mustered ou
th 13 42 -- 55 Kenesaw Mountain, Ga.             June 27, 1864. Including other losses near Kenesaw Mountain.             40th Indiana Newton's Fourth 34 125 10 169 113th Ohio Davis's Fourteenth 27 121 5 153 121st Ohio Davis's Fourteenth 22 125 -- 147 125th Illinois Davis's Fourteenth 47 52 5 104 86th Illinois Davis's Fourteenth 29 75 12 116 74th Illinois Newton's Fourth 21 58 10 89 103d Illinois Harrow's Fifteenth 22 51 -- 73 Jackson, Miss.             July 6, 1864.             76th Illinois -------------- Seventeenth 16 71 15 102 Vining's Station, Ga.             July 9, 1864.             21st Ohio Johnson's Fourteenth 15 39 2 56 Monocacy, Md.             July 9, 1864.             9th New York H. A. Ricketts's Sixth 13 89 99 201 14th New Jersey Ricketts's Sixth 24 87 29 140 106th New York Ricketts's Sixth 16 73 44 133 151st New York Ricketts's Sixth 24 45 32 101 110th Ohio Ri
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), IV. Cold Harbor (search)
pecially a host of boxes, no two alike. The upper deck, to render it attractive, was ornamented with a pile of two or three hundred pairs of crutches. For myself I got some iced lemonade on board, and retired much refreshed and highly patriotic. One of the great sights down there is the huge army hospital, a whole plain, white with large tents. These are capable of receiving 7000 patients and have at present about 3000. All are under charge of my excellent classmate, Dr. Ned Dalton. July 6, 1864 We have no rain here — never expect any; air hazy with a faint dust, finer than twice volted flour, which settles on everything — but that won't kill anybody. So Ewell is (or was — don't know his whereabouts at this precise moment) at Harper's Ferry. We knew he was poking up there somewhere. As to the A. of P., it is sitting here, trying to get some fresh cabbages, not very successfully, so far — the last issue, I am told, furnished one small one to every fifteen men. Old Uncle Lee
und comminuted fracture of right arm, lower third, and fore-arm. Arm amputated. William Gowin, ordinary seaman, compound fracture of left thigh and leg. Seriously wounded. James Macbeth, ordinary seaman, compound fracture of left leg. Seriously wounded. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, John M. Browne, Surgeon United States Navy. Captain John A. Winslow, Commanding U. S. Steamer Kearsarge, Cherbourg. Letter from the Secretary of the Navy. Navy Department, July 6, 1864. sir: Your very brief despatches of the nineteenth and twentieth ultimo, informing the department that the piratical craft Alabama, or 290, had been sunk on the nineteenth of June, near meridian, by the Kearsarge, under your command, were this day received. I congratulate you on your good fortune in meeting this vessel, which had so long avoided the fastest ships, and some of the most vigilant and intelligent officers of the service; and for the ability displayed in this combat you ha
Foreign accounts of the fight. Letter from Secretary of State, transmitting copy of despatch no. 302 of the United States Consul at Liverpool. Department of State, Washington, July 6, 1864. sir: I have the honor to transmit, herewith, a despatch, No. 302, of the United States Consul at Liverpool, announcing the destruction of the pirate Alabama by the United States steamship Kearsage, off Cherbourg, and inclosing several accounts of the action clipped from British journals. The department joins in the Consul's congratulations at an event which at once illustrates the gallantry and efficiency of the navy, and fitly closes the predatory career of its antagonist. I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant, William H. Seward. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy. Despatch of U. S. Consul at Liverpool. No. 302.] United States Consulate, Liverpool, July 21, 1864. sir: The pirate Alabama has at last met the fate she deserves. She was sunk by the Unit
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