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last sad offices have been performed for one very, very dear to us, with sore hearts we must go back to busy life again. It is wonderful to me that we retain our senses. While the cannon is booming in our ears from the neighbourhood of Petersburg, we know that Hunter is raiding among our friends in the most relentless way; that the Military Institute has been burnt, and that we have nothing to hope for the West, unless General Early and General Breckinridge can destroy him utterly. July 18, 1864. Since the last note in my diary we have been pursuing our usual course. The tenor of our way is singularly rough and uneven, marked by the sound of cannon, the marching of troops, and all the paraphernalia of grimvisaged war; but we still visit our friends and relatives, and have our pleasant social and family meetings, as though we were at peace with all the world. The theme of every tongue is our army in Maryland. What is it doing? What will be the result of the venture? The l
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 3 (search)
24, 1864.Action at La Fayette. July 4, 1864.Skirmishes at Ruff's Mill, Neal Dow Station, and Rottenwood Creek. July 5-17, 1864.Operations on the line of the Chattahoochee River, with skirmishes at Howell's, Turner's, and Pace's Ferries, Isham's Ford, and other points. July 10-22, 1864.Rousseau's raid from Decatur, Ala., to the West Point and Montgomery Railroad, with skirmishes near Coosa River (11th), near Greenpoint and at Ten Island Ford (14th), near Auburn and near Chehaw (18th). July 18, 1864.Skirmish at Buck Head. General John B. Hood, C. S. Army, supersedes General Joseph E. Johnston in command of the Army of Tennessee. July 19, 1864.Skirmishes on Peach Tree Creek. July 20, 1864.Battle of Peach Tree Creek. July 21, 1864.Engagement at Bald (or Leggett's) Hill. July 22, 1864.Battle of Atlanta. Maj. Gen. John A. Logan, U. S. Army, succeeds Maj. Gen. James B. McPherson in command of the Army of the Tennessee. July 22-24, 1864.Garrard's raid to Covington. July 23, 1864.B
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 182 (search)
ill send orders by courier. 1 a. m., sent to the division commanders orders of the day for the Fourth Army Corps for July 18, 1864, as follows: For full text of orders and letter (here omitted) see Part V. 5 a. m., received from headquarters Department of the Cumberland (General Thomas) the orders of the day for July 18, 1864, as follows: For full text of orders and letter (here omitted) see Part V. Accompanying this order was a copy of a letter of instructions, dated headquarreceived Special Field Orders, No. 37, headquarters Military Division of the Mississippi, dated near Cross Keys, Ga., July 18, 1864, as follows : For full text of orders and letter (here omitted) see Part V. Accompanying this order was a lettn to Major-General Thomas, of which the following is a copy, dated headquarters Military Division of the Mississippi, July 18, 1864: For full text of orders and letter (here omitted) see Part V. 9.30 a. m., reported our situation and position
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 16: career of the Anglo-Confederate pirates.--closing of the Port of Mobile — political affairs. (search)
ssession of one hundred and four guns, and fourteen hundred and sixty-four men. By this victory the port of Mobile was effectually closed to blockade-runners, and the land operations against the city which occurred some months later, thereby became easier, and were more speedily successful. The victories at Mobile and Atlanta, See page 894. following close upon each other, with minor successes elsewhere, and the noble response given to the call of the President a few weeks before, July 18, 1864. for three hundred thousand men, to re-enforce the two great armies in the field, in Virginia and Georgia, gave assurance that the end of the Civil War and the return of peace were nigh. Because of these triumphs, the President issued Sept. 3. the proclamation, and also the order for salutes of artillery, At Washington, New York, Boston, Philadelphia, Pittsburg, Baltimore, Newport (Kentucky), St. Louis, New Orleans, Mobile Bay, Pensacola, Hilton Head, and New Berne. mentioned in not
eutenant E. B. Wade, Aide-de-Camp, Mr. James H. Haggerty, and myself, to General J. B. Hood, at Lovejoy's Station, Ga., that the loss of that Army, from all causes during the campaign from Dalton to Atlanta, Ga., between the 7th of May and 18th of July, 1864, was twenty-five thousand (25,000) effective men. He also stated that the Army, when at Adairsville, Ga., numbered fifty-three thousand (53,000) effective infantry, after the losses sustained at Rocky Face Mountain and Resaca, Ga. (Signeith, Aide-de-Camp, Mr. Haggerty, and myself, to General J. B. Hood, commanding Army at Lovejoy Station, Ga., that the loss of that Army, from all causes, during the campaign from Dalton to Atlanta, Ga., between the 7th day of May and the 18th day of July, 1864, was twentyfive thousand (25,000) effective men. He (Majot Kinloch Falconer) also stated that the Army when at Adairsville, Ga., numbered fifty-three thousand (53,000) effective infantry, after the losses sustained at Rocky Face Mountain
opylae of the South without risking a general battle, it is hardly reasonable to suppose that he would have made a final stand upon the plains of Georgia. According to the following extract from an official telegram, even General Sherman was in doubt as to whether or not Johnston would fight for Atlanta: Van Horne, 11 Army C., vol. II, page 121. headquarters Military Division of the Mississippi, in the field, at San House, Peach Tree road, five miles N. E. Of Buckhead, Ga., July 18, 1864: * * It is hard to realize that Johnston will give up Atlanta without a fight, but it may be so. Let us develop the truth. W. T. Sherman, Major General Commanding. My predecessor had evidently another scheme in reserve. General Forrest was required, with five thousand (5000) cavalry in Tennessee, to destroy Sherman's communications with Nashville,--at least, in so far as to hinder Sherman from receiving sufficient supplies for the maintenance of his Army. General Wheeler's cava
or General, Richmond, Va. General:--I have the honor to submit the following Report of the operations of the Army of Tennessee, while commanded by me, from July 18th, 1864, to January 23d, 1865. The results of a campaign do not always show how the General in command has discharged his duty. Their enquiry should be not what h done with the same daily loss occurring, when it was placed under my direction. The Army was turned over to me by order of the President at Atlanta on the 18th July, 1864. Its effective strength was: Infantry, thirtythree thousand seven hundred and fifty (33,750); artillery, three thousand five hundred (3500); cavalry, ten thoason, A. A. General Sir:--In compliance with the wishes of the Commanding General, I submit the following brief report of the operations of this corps from July 18th, 1864, the day on which General Hood took command of the Army of Tennessee, to September 29th, 1864, the day on which we re-crossed the Chattahoochee. On the 18th
rt was misapprehended in view of his explicit, repeated refusals to do more in the premises than be the means of bringing the Confederate agents to Washington, provided they should prove to be responsibly accredited. The whole matter thus terminated in failure and disappointment, with some exasperation on the Rebel side, and very decided condemnation on the part of the Opposition, because of a final missive from the President, couched in these terms: Executive Mansion, Washington, July 18, 1864. To whom it may concern: Any proposition which embraces the restoration of peace, the integrity of the whole Union, and the abandonment of Slavery, and which comes by and. with an authority that can control the armies now at war against the United States, will be received ad considered by the Executive Government of the United States, and will be met by liberal terms on substantial and collateral points; and the bearer or bearers thereof shall have safe conduct both ways. (Signed)
128 Totals 7 128 135 2 132 134 1,309 135 killed == 10.3 per cent. Total of killed and wounded, 645; died in Confederate prisons, 54. battles. K. & M. W. battles. K. & M. W. Berryville, Va., Oct. 18, 1863 2 Fisher's Hill, Va., Sept. 22, 1864 4 New Market, Va., May 15, 1864 39 Strasburg, Va., Oct. 13, 1864 15 Piedmont, Va., June 5, 1864 22 Cedar Creek, Va., Oct. 19, 1864 5 Lynchburg, Va., June 18, 1864 6 Hatcher's Run, Va., March 31, 1865 2 Island Ford, Va., July 18, 1864 3 Fort Gregg, Va., April 2, 1865 9 Berryville, Va., Sept. 4, 1864 1 High Bridge, Va., April 6, 1865 1 Opequon, Va., Sept. 19, 1864 23 Place Unknown 3 Present, also, at Martinsburg; Halltown; Petersburg; Appomattox. notes.--Recruited in the five Western counties of the State. Colonel Wells had already served with honorable distinction as Lieutenant-Colonel of the First Massachusetts before he was transferred to the command of the Thirty-fourth. The regiment left Worcester
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 11 (search)
ation in the Federal army.-and survived the rout and disorganization at Nashville-as they proved at Bentonville. If, however, such proof is not conclusive, the testimony of the two most distinguished officers of that army-Lieutenant-Generals Hardee and Stewart--is certainly not less than equivalent to General Hood's assertion. In a letter to me, dated April 20, 1868, Lieutenant-General Hardee testifies: General: In regard to the condition of the Army of Tennessee when, on the 18th of July, 1864, at Atlanta, Georgia, you were relieved of command, I have the honor to say: That, in my opinion, the organization, morale, and effectiveness of that army, excellent at the opening of the campaign, had not been impaired at its close. There had been nothing in the campaign to produce that effect. It is true that the superior numbers of the enemy, enabling them to cover our front with a part of their forces, and to use the remainder for flanking purposes, rendered our positions su
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