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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 35 35 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 16 16 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 10 10 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 9 9 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 7 7 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 3 3 Browse Search
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 3 3 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 12, 1864., [Electronic resource] 2 2 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 2 2 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 2 2 Browse Search
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Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, The campaign in Georgia-Sherman's March to the sea-war anecdotes-the March on Savannah- investment of Savannah-capture of Savannah (search)
is were not long in reaching Sherman. He took advantage of the information they gave, and made all the preparations possible for him to make to meet what now became expected, attempts to break his communications. Something else had to be done: and to Sherman's sensible and soldierly mind the idea was not long in dawning upon him, not only that something else had to be done, but what that something else should be. On September 10th I telegraphed Sherman as follows: City Point, Va., Sept. 10, 1864 Major-General Sherman, Atlanta, Georgia. So soon as your men are sufficiently rested, and preparations can be made, it is desirable that another campaign should be commenced. We want to keep the enemy constantly pressed to the end of the war. If we give him no peace whilst the war lasts, the end cannot be distant. Now that we have all of Mobile Bay that is valuable, I do not know but it will be the best move to transfer Canby's troops to act upon Savannah, whilst you move on Augusta
ith a little better income. As provisions continued to increase in price, and our prospect seemed very poor for the winter, my office was obtained without the least effort on my part, though I had often sought one in the Treasury without success; and now, when difficulties seem to be increasing with the great scarcity of provisions, the way is again made comparatively easy. So it seems that the Lord intends us to work for our daily bread, and to be independent, but not to abound. September 10th, 1864. We must give up our rooms by the last of this month, and the question now arises about our future abode. We are searching hither and thither. We had thought for a week past that our arrangements were most delightfully made, and that we had procured, together with Dr. M. and Colonel G., six rooms in a house on Franklin Street. The arrangement had been made, and the proprietor gone from town. The M's and ourselves were to take four rooms in the third story; the back parlour on t
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 7 (search)
he honor to submit the following report of wounded since the commencement of operations at Tunnel Hill, Ga., up to the present date: Wounded. Department of the Cumberland5,069 Department of the Tennessee562 Department of the Ohio330 Total5,961 I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, Edwd. D. Kittoe, Medical Inspector, U. S. Army. Maj. Gen. W. T. Sherman, Comdg. Military Division of the Mississippi. Hdqrs. Military Division of the Mississippi, Atlanta, Ga., September 10, 1864. General: I have the honor to report that during the recent campaign resulting in the capture of Atlanta, the health of the troops has been remarkably good. This is a noteworthy fact, when the severe labor and privations endured by most of your army during the autumn and part of the winter are taken into consideration. For more than four months on short rations, but poorly housed and badly clothed, with no appreciable variation in diet, scurvy naturally prevailed to some extent in
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 8 (search)
No. 4. report of Brig. Gen. William F. Barry, U. S. Army, Chief of artillery. Hdqrs., Mil. Div. Of the Mississippi, Atlanta, Ga., September 10, 1864. General: I have the honor to make the following report of the artillery of the active armies of the Military Division of the Mississippi for the campaign in Northern Georgia during the summer of 1864, which resulted in the capture of Atlanta: On the 20th of March, 1864, the date of my appointment as chief of artillery of your army, the field artillery of the four separate armies, which at that time composed your command, consisted of 16,250 men (effective), 530 guns, 4,300 horses, and 987 mules. The proportion of artillery to the aggregate infantry and cavalry force was about three guns to 1,000 men. The guns were of varied patterns, twelve different calibers being at that time in actual use. The severity of the campaigns of the previous autumn and winter had also reduced the number of draft animals much below what was ne
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 26 (search)
No. 22. report of Lieut. Col. Augustus G. Tassin, Thirty-fifth Indiana Infantry, of operations July I-September 8. Hdqrs. Thirty-Fifth Indiana Volunteers, Atlanta, Ga., September 10, 1864. Captain: In compliance with circular of September 10, I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of the Thirty-fifth Regiment Indiana Infantry Volunteers during the recent campaign, from July 1, 1864, to the fall of Atlanta: On July 1 the regiment was stationed in front of Kenesaw Mountain, Ga., occupying a reserve position in rear of the second line of our works. On the evening of the 2d the regiment changed position to the left with the brigade, taking the place of the Second Division, Fourth Corps, which moved out. The following morning, the enemy having evacuated their position on Kenesaw Mountain, the regiment took the line of march in pursuit, passing through Marietta, coming up again with the enemy about four miles south of that place. Here the brigade w
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 32 (search)
No. 28. report of Col. Isaac C. B. Suman, Ninth Indiana Infantry. Hdqrs. Ninth Indiana Veteran Vol. Infty., Near Atlanta, Ga., September 10, 1864. Captain: In obedience to orders I submit the following report as to the part taken by my regiment in the late campaign, commencing May 3, 1864, and ending September 5, 1864: Left camp, Blue Springs, Tenn., May 3, 1864, and marched in the direction of Dalton, Ga.; reached Red Clay and encamped for the night. Reached Catoosa Springs at 2 p. m. May 4; remained at the above place all day of the 5th of May. On the morning of the 6th moved half a mile to the right and fortified. Marched at 5 o'clock on the morning of the 7th due south; reached Tunnel Hill at 2 p. m., and there encamped for the night. May 8, moved forward about four miles; there was some skirmishing, and the enemy were driven through the gap leading to Dalton; remained in camp the rest of the day and night. May 9, remained in position until 2 p. m., when we mov
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 38 (search)
No. 34. report of Col. Emerson Opdycke, one hundred and twenty-fifth Ohio Infantry, commanding First brigade, of operations August 6-September 8. Hdqrs. First Brig., Second Div., 4TH Army Corps, Atlanta, Ga., September 10, 1864. Captain: I respectfully make the following report of the operations of this brigade from August 6, 1864, when, in obedience to division orders, I assumed command, to the capture of Atlanta: I found the brigade composed of the Eighty-eighth Illinois, Major Smith; Seventy-fourth Illinois, Captain Bryan; Seventy-third Illinois, Major Motherspaw; Forty-fourth Illinois, Lieutenant-Colonel Russell; Thirty-sixth Illinois, Captain McNeal; Twenty-fourth Wisconsin, Major MacArthur; Fifteenth Missouri, Colonel Conrad, all aggregating an effective force of 1,143 officers and men. It was the extreme left of the infantry forces and but a few rods from the Howard house. The First Brigade of First Division was to my right and Colonel Minty's brigade of cavalry
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 43 (search)
No. 39. report of Lieut. Col. George W. Smith, Eighty-eighth Illinois Infantry. Hdqrs. Eighty-Eighth Illinois Infantry Vols., tlanta, September 10, 1864. Lieutenant: I have the honor to make the following report of the part taken by the regiment which I have the honor to command in the campaign which has resulted in the capture from the enemy and occupation of Atlanta: On the 3d day of May, 1864, the regiment marched from Cleveland, Tenn., its effective strength being 18 officers and 261 men. Subsequently it assisted in the occupation of Rocky Face Ridge after the capture of that place by the Third Brigade, Second Division, Fourth Army Corps. May 14 and 15, it was engaged with the enemy at Resaca. May 17, skirmished from Calhoun, Ga., to Pleasant Hill; engaged at Pleasant Hill from 4 p. m. to 6 p. m. May 25, took position at New Hope Church, on left of Twentieth Army Corps; engaged constantly in skirmishing for eleven days. June 6 and 7, covered removal of hospital, Th
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 47 (search)
No. 43. report of Brig. Gen. George D. Wagner, U. S. Army, commanding Second brigade. Hdqrs. Second Brig., Second Div., 4TH Army Corps, Near Atlanta, Ga., September 10, 1864. Sir: The following is respectfully submitted as a report of the part taken by my brigade, composed of the Fortieth and Fifty-seventh Indiana Volunteers, the Twenty-sixth and Ninety-seventh Ohio Volunteers, the Twenty-eighth Kentucky Volunteers, and the One hundredth Illinois Volunteers, in the campaign which terminated in the capture of Atlanta: At the beginning of the campaign the effective force of the brigade was 137 officers and 1,870 men. On Tuesday, the 3d day of May, 1864, my brigade, with the rest of General Newton's division, marched from Cleveland southward on the road leading toward Dalton, Ga. We arrived at Catoosa Springs on the 5th of May, nothing of importance having occurred during the march. The command laid by one day at the Springs. On the morning of Saturday, May 7, we wer
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 55 (search)
No. 51. report of Col. Emerson Opdycke, one hundred and twenty-fifth Ohio Infantry, of operations May 3-14. headquarters 125TH Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Atlanta, Ga., September 10, 1864. Captain: I have the honor of submitting the following report of my regiment from May 3 to May 14, 1864, at which time the command fell upon Lieut. Col. D. H. Moore, I having since then been in command of a demi-brigade or a brigade: May 3, I moved with the brigade at 12 m. from Cleveland, Tenn., toward Dalton, Ga., with an aggregate of 500 officers and men, fully equipped for an active campaign. We bivouacked at 7.30 p. m. after a march of about fourteen miles. May 4, the march was resumed at 6 a. m. As we were near the enemy the march was slow. Halted at about seven miles from Tunnel Hill and commenced throwing up works, but after dusk we changed positions and occupied a ridge that led down to Catoosa Springs. May 5 was spent in throwing up defensive works along the crest of the ridge.
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