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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 255 255 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 93 93 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 46 46 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 16 16 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 9 9 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 9 9 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 8 8 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 7 7 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 6 6 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 5 5 Browse Search
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J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 43 (search)
nment here to sell cotton in exposed situations to the enemy's agents for specie, and to buy for Confederate notes. The funeral expenses of Gen. Morgan the other day amounted to $1500; the Quartermaster-General objects to paying it, and sends the bill to the Secretary for instructions. The following is a copy of Gen. Lee's indorsement on Lieut.-Col. Moseby's report of his operations from the 1st of March to the 11th of September, 1864: headquarters, army of Northern Virginia, September 19th, 1864. Respectfully forwarded to the Adjutant and InspectorGen-eral for the information of the department. Attention is invited to the activity and skill of Col. Moseby, and-the intelligence and courage of the officers and men of his command, as displayed in this report. With the loss of little more than 20 men, he has killed, wounded, and captured, during the period embraced in this report, about 1200 of the enemy, and taken more than 1600 horses and mules, 230 beef cattle, and 85
indifferent he appeared to be regarding any efforts to be made in his behalf. He did his duty as President, and rested secure in the belief that he would be re-elected whatever might be done for or against him. The importance of retaining Indiana in the column of Republican States was not to be overlooked. How the President viewed it, and how he proposed to secure the vote of the State, is shown in the following letter written to General Sherman: Executive mansion, Washington, September 19, 1864. Major General Sherman: The State election of Indiana occurs on the 11th of October, and the loss of it to the friends of the Government would go far towards losing the whole Union cause. The bad effect upon the November election, and especially the giving the State government to those who will oppose the war in every possible way, are too much to risk if it can be avoided. The draft proceeds, notwithstanding its strong tendency to lose us the State. Indiana is the only importan
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 104 (search)
in killed, wounded, and missing. John R. Edie, Major Fifteenth Infantry, Commanding. Capt. G. W. Smith, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General, First Division. Report of casualties of the Second brigade, First Division, Fourteenth Army Corps, for September 1, 1864. Zzz John R. Edie, Major Fifteenth Infantry, Commanding. Hdqrs. Second Brig., First Div., 14TH Army Corps, Jonesborough, Ga., September 2, 1864. Hdqrs. Second Brig., First Div., 14TH Army Corps, Atlanta, Ga., September 19, 1864. Captain: I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of this brigade during the campaign which commenced 7th of May, 1864, at Ringgold, Ga., and ended 1st of September, 1864, at Jonesborough, some twenty-two miles south of Atlanta, on the railroad leading from the latter place to Macon, Ga.: The brigade was under the command of Brig. Gen. John H. King, and was constituted as follows: First Battalion, Fifteenth Infantry, Maj. Albert Tracy, 8 officers, 376
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 108 (search)
No. 104. reports of Capt. William S. Aicman us, Fifteenth U. S. Infantry, commanding Second Battalion. Hdqrs. Second Battalion, Fifteenth U. S. Infantry, White Hall, Ga., September 19, 1864. Captain: I have the honor to forward the following report of the marches, battles, and engagements in which this battalion participated in the campaign of Atlanta: The battalion, composed of six companies-Company A, commaned by Lieutenant Jackson; Company B, by Capt. W. S. Mc- Manus; Company C, by Captain Norton; Company D, by Lieutenant Derickson with Lieutenant Burness; Company E, by Lieutenant Harrison, and Company F, by Lieutenant Forbes, numbering in all 10 officers and 307 enlisted men-left Graysville, Ga., on the 3d of May, under the command of Maj. John R. Edie, as a part of the Second Brigade, First Division, Fourteenth Army Corps, and marched to Ringgold and went into camp. Remained at Ringgold until the 7th of May, when the battalion marched to Tunnel Hill and went into b
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 114 (search)
No. 110. reports of Capt. James Mooney, Nineteenth U. S. Infantry, comrn manding First Battalion. Hdqrs. First Battalion, 19TH Regt. U. S. Infty., Camp near Atlanta, Ga., September 19, 1864. Captain: In accordance with instructions from brigade headquarters, I have the honor to report the operations of this battalion during the recent campaign in the State of Georgia. The battalion marched from camp at Graysville, Ga., at 8 a. m. on 3d of May, 1864, about five miles, and to within one mile of Ringgold, at which point it remained until the morning of the 7th May, when it moved through Hooker's Gap, about five miles to the front, and formed line of battle on the right of Tunnel Hill. The battalion was here detailed on outpost duty to guard a road leading into the rebel lines, and I detached two companies to reconnoiter; was relieved from this duty on the ensuing morning, when the battalion joined the brigade, moved to the front about one mile, occupied a ridge on fr
d Gordon's at Bunker Hill. At daylight of the 19th these positions of the Confederate infantry still obtained, with the cavalry of Lomax, Jackson, and Johnson on the right of Ramseur, while to the left and rear of the enemy's general line was Fitzhugh Lee, covering from Stephenson's depot west across the Valley pike to Apple-pie Ridge. My army ORGANIZATION of the Union forces, commanded by Major-General Philip H. Sheridan, at the battle of Winchester (or the Opequon), Virginia, September 19, 1864. headquarters escort: Sixth United States Cavalry, Captain Ira W. Claflin. Sixth Army Corps: Major-General Horatio G. Wright. escort: First Michigan Cavalry, Company G, Lieutenant William H. Wheeler. first division: (1) Brigadier-General David A. Russell. (2) Brigadier-General Emory Upton. (3) Colonel Oliver Edwards. first brigade: Lieutenant-Colonel Edward L. Campbell. Fourth New Jersey, Captain Baldwin Hufty. Tenth New Jersey, Major Lambert Boeman. Fifteenth New Jersey, Captain Willi<
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Union cavalry in the Hood campaign. (search)
The Union cavalry in the Hood campaign. by James Harrison Wilson, Major-General, U. S. V., and Brevet Major-General, U. S. A. Bridge over the Cumberland at Nashville Until after Sheridan's victory of the Opequon, September 19, 1864, I had led the Third Cavalry Division. Toward the close of October, 1864, I reported to Sherman at Gaylesville, Alabama, at which place the latter had suspended his northward pursuit of Hood, and after a full and interesting conference I was announced, on October 24th, as chief-of-cavalry, and placed in absolute command of all the mounted forces of the three armies, only a small proportion of which were actually with the colors for duty. This force was by the same order detached entirely from the control of the army commanders and designated as the Cavalry Corps of the Military Division of the Mississippi. General Sherman, after issuing all the necessary instructions and unfolding his plans for the operations of the army, and especially of thi
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Sheridan in the Shenandoah Valley. (search)
the battle of Cedarville. A force of Brevet Major-General David A. Russell, killed at the battle of Winchester, September 19, 1864. from a photograph cavalry under Fitz Lee, supported by a brigade of Kershaw's division, made a descent on Devin'lost about 300 men in killed, wounded, and prisoners, and Wilson's cavalry lost Map of the battle of Winchester, September 19, 1864. in prisoners some 50 men. At this time, information having reached Sheridan that the reenforcements that had comeoved Sprout's Spring Mill, Opequon River, Va., hospital of the Sixth Army Corps during the battle of Winchester, September 19, 1864. from a War-time sketch. toward Shepherdstown. Between Kearneysville and Leetown he was met by Torbert with the hting without cover, the The battle of Winchester--Ricketts's advance against Rodes's division on the morning of September 19, 1864. casualties were very great. Wright's infantry forced Ramseur and Rodes steadily to the rear, while Emory on the
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 13: invasion of Maryland and Pennsylvania-operations before Petersburg and in the Shenandoah Valley. (search)
on with Merritt's horsemen. These two powerful cavalry divisions enveloped Winchester on the east and north. Early's position compensated him, in a degree, for his inferiority in numbers, while Sheridan's superior cavalry gave the Nationals a very great advantage. This is from a sketch, from the eastern bank of the stream, looking toward Winchester, made by the author in October, 1866. It shows the place where the whole of Sheridan's army crossed the stream on the morning of the 19th of September, 1864. Between the two armies lay a broken, wooded country, over which it was difficult for troops to move; and to reach the left and center of Early's line (which seemed to be the only vulnerable points, for the right was too, strongly posted to be moved by assault), the Nationals had to go through the narrow pass among wooded hills already mentioned. This was undertaken at ten o'clock, first by Ricketts's division of the Sixth Corps, followed by Grover's of the Nineteenth. These p
uon, Va., Sept. 13, 1864 1 Banks's Ford, Va. 1 Opequon, Va., Sept. 19, 1864 3 Funkstown, Md. 2 Cedar Creek, Va. 10 Wilderness, Va. 84t. 4, 1864 1 High Bridge, Va., April 6, 1865 1 Opequon, Va., Sept. 19, 1864 23 Place Unknown 3 Present, also, at Martinsburg; Halltow Aug. 20, 1862 2 Hazel River, Va., Oct. 6, 1863 1 Opequon, Va., Sept. 19, 1864 3 Thoroughfare Gap, Va., Aug. 28, ‘62 2 Culpepper, Va., Oct., Nov. 5, 1862 1 Stevensburg, Va. Oct. 11, 1863 3 Opequon, Va., Sept. 19, 1864 3 Sulphur Springs, Va. Nov. 8, 1862 1 Culpeper, Va., Oct. 12 Aug. 9, 1862 4 Todd's Tavern, Va., May 6, 1864 8 Opequon, Va., Sept. 19, 1864 11 Manassas, Va., Aug. 30, 1862 15 Beaver Dam, Va., May 9, 1ce unknown 1 Gainesville, Va., Oct. 30, 1863 1 Opequon, Va., Sept. 19, 1864 10     notes.--Organized at Detroit in Aug. 1862, leavingunknown 2 Charlestown, W. Va., Oct. 18, 1863 1 Opequon, Va., Sept. 19, 1864 5     notes.--One of the most remarkable and gallant cava<
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