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as buried; and yesterday I saw my sweet young cousin F. M. die, and to-morrow expect to attend her funeral. Full of brightness and animation, full of Christian hope and charity, she was the life of her father's house, the solace and comfort of her already afflicted mother, one of the many mothers whose first-born has fallen a sacrifice to the war. This interesting girl, with scarcely a warning, has passed into heaven, leaving a blank in the hearts of her family never to be filled. December 26th, 1864. The sad Christmas has passed away. J. and C. were with us, and very cheerful. We exerted ourselves to be so too. The Church services in the morning were sweet and comforting. St. Paul's was dressed most elaborately and beautifully with evergreens; all looked as usual; but there is much sadness on account of the failure of the South to keep Sherman back. When we got home our family circle was small, but pleasant. The Christmas turkey and ham were not. We had aspired to a turke
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 5.35 (search)
esults. Alone I never measured it as now my eulogists do, but coupled with Thomas's acts about Nashville, and those about Richmond directed in person by General Grant, the March to the sea, with its necessary corollary, the march northward to Raleigh, became vastly important, if not actually conclusive of the war. Mr. Lincoln was the wisest man of our day, and more truly and kindly gave voice to my secret thoughts and feeling when he wrote me at Savannah from Washington under date of December 26th, 1864: When you were about leaving Atlanta for the Atlantic coast I was anxious, if not fearful; but feeling that you were the better judge, and remembering nothing risked, nothing gained, I did not interfere. Now the undertaking being a success, the honor is all yours; for I believe none of us went further than to acquiesce; and taking the work of General Thomas into account, as it should be taken, it is indeed a great success. Not only does it afford the obvious and immediate milit
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Fort Fisher, N. C.: January 13-15, 1865. (search)
ntered the fort our loss is represented to have been about 500 killed and wounded. The garrison consisted of about 110 commissioned officers and 2400 or 2500 men. The strength thus stated probably included the 21st and 25th South Carolina sent from Hagood's Brigade. General Terry reported the capture of 112 officers and 1971 men. Colonel Lamb writes that all present in Fort Fisher, Jan. 13th-15th, including sick, killed, and wounded, numbered 1900. Naval force at Fort Fisher, Dec. 23-26, 1864, and Jan. 13-16, 1865. North Atlantic squadron: Rear-Admiral David D. Porter, Commanding. Lieutenant-Commander K. R. Breese, Fleet Captain. Lieut. M. W. Sanders, Signal Officer. Lieutenant S. W. Terry and Lieutenant S. W. Preston (k), Aides. First division, Commodore Henry K. Thatcher; Second division, Commodore Joseph Lanman; Third division, Commodore Jas. Findlay Schenck; Fourth division, Commodore S. W. Godon; iron-Clad division, Commodore Wm. Radford. Flag-ship. Malver
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 53: operations of the West Gulf Squadron in the latter part of 1864, and in 1865.--joint operations in Mobile Bay by Rear-Admiral Thatcher and General Canby. (search)
hen success was least expected. Emboldened by their first attempts, the blockade-runners from the Texan ports became more audacious, so much so that the Federal naval officers were put upon their mettle, and hence resulted a number of small but gallant affairs which, in justice to the officers concerned in them, should not be omitted. They are the small links that make up the chain of history, and were as important in the eves of the performers as more prominent affairs. On the 26th of December, 1864, a large schooner, named the Golden Belle, was lying in Galveston harbor, watching a chance to evade the blockaders outside, and make a run to Havana or Nassau. Acting-Ensign N. A. Blume, of the Virginia, asked and received permission from his commanding officer, Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant Charles H. Brown, to go in and cut out the schooner. Obtaining volunteers from the crew for the expedition, he left with the third cutter about 8:30 P. M. Having five miles to pull against a hea
dispositions which left the enemy in doubt as to his objective, and paralyzed, at Macon, Augusta, Savannah, &c., forces which should have been concentrated to oppose his advance. Sherman announced his crowning triumph to President Lincoln as follows: I beg to present you, as a Christmas gift, the city of Savannah, with 150 heavy guns and plenty of ammunition, and also about 25,000 bales of cotton. The President responded as follows: Executive Mansion, Washington, D. C., Dec. 26, 1864. my dear Gen. Sherman: Many, many thanks for your Christmas gift — the capture of Savannah. When you were about to leave Atlanta for the Atlantic coast, I was anxious, if not fearful; but, feeling that you were the better judge, and remembering that nothing risked, nothing gained, I did not interfere. Now, the undertaking being a success, the honor is all yours; for I believe none of us went further than to acquiesce. And, taking the work of Gen. Thomas into the account, as it sh
t very much diminished. The three explosions spoken of are readily accounted for — the deck-house, the after-hold, and the berth-deck would take fire in succession if ignited at one point. [No. 133. See page 808.] report of D. D. Porter, Dec. 26, 1864. Report to Secretary of Navy of D. D. Porter, Dec. 26, 1864. Fort Fisher, p. 123. The gallant party, after coolly making all their arrangements for the explosion, left the vessel. The last thing that they did was to set her on fire unDec. 26, 1864. Fort Fisher, p. 123. The gallant party, after coolly making all their arrangements for the explosion, left the vessel. The last thing that they did was to set her on fire under the cabin. Then taking to their boats, they made their escape off to the Wilderness, lying close by. The Wilderness then put off shore with good speed to avoid any ill-effects that might happen from the explosion. At forty-five minutes past one of the morning of the 24th, the explosion took place, and the shock was nothing like so severe as was expected. It shook the vessel some, and broke one or two glasses, but nothing more. [no. 134. see page 808.] Bureau of Ordnance, Navy Departme
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 21 (search)
eneral Grant assented to the march to the sea, and, although many of his warm friends and admirers insist that he was the author and projector of that march, and that I simply executed his plans, General Grant has never, in my opinion, thought so or said so. The truth is fully given in an original letter of President Lincoln, which I received at Savannah, Georgia, and have at this instant before me, every word of which is in his own familiar handwriting. It is dated-- Washington, December 26, 1864. . . . . . . . . . When you were about leaving Atlanta for the Atlantic coast, I was anxious, if not fearful; but, feeling that you were the better judge, and remembering nothing risked, nothing gained, I did not interfere. Now, the undertaking being a success, the honor is all yours; for I believe none of us went further than to acquiesce; and, taking the work of General Thomas into account, as it should be taken, it is indeed a great success. Not only does it afford the obvious
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 22 (search)
rginia, and if the cause of the South is lost he wants Richmond to be the last place surrendered. If he has such views, it may be well to indulge him until we get every thing else in our hands. Congratulating you and the army again upon the splendid results of your campaign, the like of which is not read of in past history, I subscribe myself, more than ever, if possible, your friend, U. S. Grant, Lieutenant-General. headquarters armies of the United States, City Point, Virginia, December 26, 1864. Major-General W. T. Sherman, Savannah, Georgia. General: Your very interesting letter of the 22d inst., brought by Major Gray, of General Foster's staff, is just at hand. As the major starts back at once, I can do no more at present than simply acknowledge its receipt. The capture of Savannah, with all its immense stores, must tell upon the people of the South. All well here. Yours truly, U. S. Grant, Lieutenant-General. headquarters military division of the Mississippi, Sa
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 23 (search)
General Howard will keep a small guard at Forts Rosedale, Beaulieu, Wimberley, Thunderbolt, and Bonaventura, and he will cause that shore and Skidaway Island to be examined very closely, with a view to finding many and convenient points for the embarkation of troops and wagons on seagoing vessels. By order of Major-General W. T. Sherman, L. M. Dayton, Aide-de-Camp. [special field order no. 143.] headquarters military division of the Mississippi, in the field, Savannah, Georgia, December 26, 1864. The city of Savannah and surrounding country will be held as a military post, and adapted to future military uses, but, as it contains a population of some twenty thousand people, who must be provided for, and as other citizens may come, it is proper to lay down certain general principles, that all within its military jurisdiction may understand their relative duties and obligations. 1. During war, the military is superior to civil authority, and, where interests clash, the civi
Twentieth army corps, Savannah, Georgia, December 26, 1864. Lieutenant George Robinson, Acting Assiunteer infantry, near Savannah, Georgia, December 26, 1864. Captain: I have the honor to forwardlunteer infantry, near Savannah Georgia, December 26, 1864. Colonel George Robinson, Commanding Thia volunteer infantry, Savannah, Georgia, December 26, 1864. Lieutenant A. H. W. Creigh, Acting Assio volunteer infantry, Savannah, Georgia, December 26, 1864. A. H. W. Creigh, First Lieutenant andn volunteer infantry, Savannah, Georgia, December 26, 1864. Captain O. T. May, Acting Assistant Adja volunteer infantry, Savannah, Georgia, December 26, 1864. Captain A. G. Kellam, Acting Assistant ssary of Subsistence, Savannah, Georgia, December 26, 1864. Captain A. G. Kellam, Aacting Assistanton, Twentieth army corps, Savannah, Ga., December 26, 1864. To Captain John Speed, Assistant AdjutaTwentieth army corps, Savannah, Georgia, December 26, 1864. Captain John Speed, Assistant Adjutant-[6 more...]
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