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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Organization of the two governments. (search)
ostmaster-General: J. H. Reagan (Texas), March 6, 1861. Ii. Reorganization. (Feb. 22, 1862, to April, 1865.) Secretary of State: R. M. T. Hunter, July 24, 1861 Secretary of State: Judah P. Benjamin, March 17, 1862. Secretary of War: Judah P. Benjamin, Sept. 17, 1861 Secretary of War: George W. Randolph, March 17, 1862 Secretary of War: Gustavus W. Smith, acting, Nov. 17, 1862 Secretary of War: James A. Seddon, Nov. 20, 1862 Secretary of War: John C. Breckinridge, Jan. 28, 1865. Secretary of the Navy : Stephen R. Mallory. Secretary of the Treasury: C. G. Memminger Secretary of the Treasury: George A. Trenholm , June, 1864. Attorney-General: Thomas Bragg Attorney-General: Thomas H. Watts (Ala), March 17, 1862 Attorney-General: George Davis (N. C.), 1864-5. Postmaster-General: John H. Reagan. The Confederate States War Department. Secretary of War: (see above). Assistant Secretary of War: Albert T. Bledsoe (April 1, 1862) Assistant S
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Holding Kentucky for the Union. (search)
ndorsement, this day made.--editors. His example was followed by most of the higher officers, and the State Guard began rapidly to disintegrate: It was no uncommon sight in Louisville, shortly after this, to see a squad of recruits for the Union service marching up one side of a street while a squad destined for the Confederacy was moving down the other. John C. Breckinridge, Major-General, C. S. A.; Vice-President of the United States, 1857-61; Confederate Secretary of War, appointed Jan. 28, 1865. from a daguerreotype taken about 1850. In the interior, a train bearing a company destined for Nelson's camp took aboard at the next county town another company which was bound for Camp Boone. The officers in charge made a treaty by which their men were kept in separate cars. On the day after the August election Nelson's recruits began to gather at his rendezvous. Camp Dick Robinson was situated in a beautiful blue-grass country, near where the pike for Lancaster and Crab Orchard
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Exchange of prisoners. (search)
mittee on the Conduct of the War, which he concludes by saying, that he was compelled to make the exposition so that it might be seen that these lives were spent as a part of the system of attack upon the rebellion, devised by the wisdom of the general-in-chief of the armies to destroy it by depletion, depending upon our superior numbers to win the victory at last. Nor were these the only statements made by General Butler in relation to these matters. In his speech at Lowell on the 28th of January, 1865, after referring to the conference held at Fortress Monroe between himself and me, he said: I reported the points of agreement between myself and the rebel agent to the Secretary of War, and asked for power to adjust the other questions of difference, so as to have the question of enslaving negro soldiers stand alone, to be dealt with by itself; and that the whole power of the United States should be exerted to do justice to those who had fought the battles of the country, and been ca
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The peace Commission.-letter from Ex-President Davis. (search)
ssrs. Stevens, Hunter and Campbell. [Copy.]Washington, January 13, 1865. F. P. Blair; Esq.: Sir: You having shown me Mr. Davis' letter to you of the 12th instant, you may say to him that I have constantly been, am now, and shall continue ready to receive any agent whom he or any other influential person now resisting the national authority may send to me with the view of securing peace to the people of our one common country. Yours, &c., (Signed) A. Lincoln. Richmond, January 28th, 1865. Hon. R. M. T. Hunter: Sir: In compliance with the letter of Mr. Lincoln, of which the foregoing is a copy, you are hereby requested to proceed to Washington city for conference with him upon the subject to which it relates. With great respect, your obedient servant, [The above draft of letter to Mr. Hunter was amended by the President, and the letter as amended and signed by him was as follows:] In conformity with the letter of Mr. Lincoln, of which the foregoing is a copy, you
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., A hot day on Marye's Heights. (search)
mation as well, to be read and then given to him. It was as follows: Should General Anderson, on your left, be compelled to fall back.to the second line of heights, you must conform to his movements. Descending the hill into the sunken road, I: made my way through the troops, to a little house where General Cobb had his headquarters, and handed him the dispatch. He read it carefully, and said, James A. Seddon, Secretary of War to the Southern Confederacy, from-november 20, 1862, to January 28, 1865. from a photograph. Well! if they wait for me to fall back, they will wait a long time. Hardly had he spoken, when a brisk skirmish fire was heard in front, toward the town, and looking over the stone-wall we saw our skirmishers falling back, firing as they came; at the same time the head of a Federal column was seen emerging from one of the streets of the town. They came on at the double-quick, with loud cries of Hi! Hi! Hi! which we could distinctly hear. Their arms were ca
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 50: Second attack on Fort Fisher. (search)
nt, K. R. Breese, Fleet-Captain. Rear-Admiral David D. Porter, Commanding North Atlantic Squadron. Dispatch of Rear-Admiral D. D. Porter, commending officers, etc. North Atlantic Squadron, U. S. Flag-Ship Malvern, Cape Fear River, January 28, 1865. Sir — After such an engagement and success as this fleet has met with, I think it due to the officers engaged to mention those particularly who, in my opinion, deserve the commendation of the Department or merit promotion. I did not thionor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, David D. Porter, Rear-Admiral. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. Additional report of fleet-captain K. R. Breese. Flag-Ship Malvern, Cape Fear River, January 28, 1865. Admiral — In my report of the assault of Fort Fisher, I did not mention the fact of Lieutenant-Commander Cushman being wounded, as he made so light of the affair and did not wish to be included among those mentioned as such. Since, I ha
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 57: the ram Stonewall. (search)
ossession of the Confederate Government. The Stonewall was placed under the command of Captain Thomas Jefferson Page, an able officer, formerly of the United States Navy. She had, we regret to say, an opportunity of inflicting a humiliation upon the American Navy which was hard to bear, considering that its name almost throughout the conflict had been without a stain, and that the reputation it had gained in the war of 1812 had not diminished in the least. The Stonewall got to sea January 28th, 1865, having received her stores and crew from another vessel dispatched by Captain Bullock from England, at Quiberon Bay, Belle Isle, France, but, owing to defects in the rudder casing, the Stonewall put in to Ferrol, Spain, for repairs, where she arrived February 2d, and fell in with the Federal frigate Niagara and sloop-of-war Sacramento, under the command of Commodore Thomas T. Craven. The Niagara was a large and fast vessel of 4,600 tons displacement, carrying ten 150-pounder Parrott
. Stephens, R. M. T. Hunter and John A. Campbell. A letter of commission or certificate of appointment for each was prepared by the Secretary of State in the following form: In compliance with the letter of Mr. Lincoln, of which the foregoing is a copy, you are hereby requested to proceed to Washington City for conference with him upon the subject to which it relates. . . . This draft of a commission was, upon perusal, modified by me so as to read as follows: Richmond, January 28, 1865. In conformity with the letter of Mr. Lincoln, of which the foregoing is a copy, you are requested to proceed to Washington City for an informal conference with him upon the issues involved in the existing war, and for the purpose of securing peace to the two countries. Some objections were made to this commission by the United States officials, because it authorized the commissioners to confer for the purpose of securing peace to the two countries; whereas the letter of Lincoln,
sible, three thousand men at once. All quiet on the Combahee. I will keep you fully advised. W. J. Hardee, Lieut.-Genl. Telegram. Augusta, Ga., Jan. 28th, 1865. Genl. Beauregard: The enemy is moving rapidly upon Augusta. Hope that troops will be hurried up. Respectfully, D. H. Hill, Major-Genl. Telegram. Charleston, S. C., Jan. 28th, 1865. Genl. G. T. Beauregard: General Hill reports from Brier Creek, enemy advancing on all roads from Savannah on west side of river. I think your presence of extreme importance at this juncture. W. J. Hardee, Lieut.-Genl. Telegram. Montgomery, Jan. 28th, 1865. Genl. G. T.Jan. 28th, 1865. Genl. G. T. Beauregard: Every energy is being used to push troops forward rapidly. They are being sent both via Selma and Mobile as fast as capacity of the railroad will permit. R. Taylor, Lieut.-Genl. Telegram. Charleston, S. C., Jan. 29th, 1865. Genl. G. T. Beauregard: The enemy have failed so far in all attempts to c
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles, Alabama, 1865 (search)
1865 Jan. 4: Skirmish, Thorn HillINDIANA--10th, 12th and 13th Cavalry (Detachments). PENNSYLVANIA--15th Cavalry. TENNESSEE--2nd Cavalry (Detachment). Union loss, 1 killed, 2 wounded. Total, 3. Jan. 26: Skirmish, Paint Rock(No Reports.) Jan. 27: Skirmish, Elrod's Tan YardOHIO--Battery "B," 1st Light Arty. (Detachment). NEW YORK--68th Infantry (Detachment). UNITED STATES--18th Colored Infantry (Detachment). Loss, 1 killed. Jan. 28: Affair, Mobile BayAttack on U. S. Steamer "Octorora." Jan. 31-April 24: Operations in Northern Alabama and Eastern TennesseeILLINOIS--21st, 36th, 38th 42nd, 44th, 51st, 59th, 73rd, 74th, 75th, 79th, 80th, 84th, 88th, 89th, 96th, 100th, and 115th Infantry. INDIANA--9th, 30th, 31st, 35th, 36th, 40th, 51st, 57th, 79th, 81st, 84th and 86th Infantry. KANSAS--8th Infantry. KENTUCKY--21st, 23rd and 28th Infantry. MICHIGAN--3rd and 4th Infantry. MISSOURI--15th Infantry. OHIO--Battery "G," 1st Light Arty.; 6th Indpt. Battery Light Arty.; 13th, 15th, 19th, 26th, 4
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