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Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 44: the lack of food and the prices in the Confederacy. (search)
ret20.00 Sherry35.00 Liquors, per Drink. French brandy3.00 Rye whiskey2.00 Apple brandy2.00 Malt Liquors, per Bottle. Porter12.00 Ale12.00 Ale, one-half bottle6.00 Cigars. Fine Havana1.00 Game of all kinds in season. Terrapins served up in every style. Bill for a dinner for nine poor Confederates at the Oriental, January 17, 1864. Soup for nine$13 50Brought forward$132 50 Venison steak31 50Apples12 00 Fried potatoes9 005 bottles of Madeira250 00 Seven birds24 006 bottles of claret120 00 Baked potatoes9 00Urn cocktail65 00 Celery13 50Jelly20 00 Bread and butter14 00Cake20 00 Coffee18 001 dozen cigars12 00 $1132 50$631 50 Approximate value of gold and Confederate currency from January 1, 1862, to April 12, 1865. Date.Gold.Currency. January 1, 1862$100$120 December 20, 1862100300 December 20, 18631001,700 January 1, 18641001,800 December 20, 186410002,800 January 1, 18651003400 February 1, 18651005,000 March 1, 18651004,700 April 10, 18651005,500
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 21: closing events of the War.--assassination of the President. (search)
their General-in-chief The continued interference of Davis in military affairs, and his keeping in place inefficient favorites to the exclusion of able men, had produced wide-spread discontent, and there was bold talk in and out of the Congress, of making General Lee dictator, thereby stripping the Arch-Conspirator of power. To avoid this humiliation, Davis consented to allow the Congress to appoint Lee General-in-chief of all the armies of the Confederacy. This was done on the first of February, 1865. The same influence caused the reappointment of General Johnston, to the command of the troops opposing Sherman. by the hand of General Pendleton. Lee refused to listen favorably to the opinions of his officers, and professed not to then. see the, necessity for a surrender. Davis, his colleague, was then at Danville, trying to reorganize the Government; and they seem to have agreed to continue the contest so long as there was a man left in the Confederacy. The remains of Lee'
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 50: Second attack on Fort Fisher. (search)
tenant Preston that they were not expected to join in the assault, I know of scarcely any who had arms that did not join it. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, K. R. Breese, Fleet-Captain. Rear-Admiral David D. Porter, Commanding North Atlantic Squadron. Dispatch of Rear-Admiral D. D. Porter, transmitting report of fleet-captain K. R. Breese, in regard to the deaths of Lieutenants Porter and Preston. North Atlantic Squadron, U. S. Flag-Ship Malvern, Cape Fear River, February 1, 1865. Sir — I inclose a communication from my fleet-captain, Lieutenant-Commander K. R. Breese, in relation to the lamented Lieutenants Preston and Porter, who fell together before the walls of Fort Fisher, and while trying to plant the Union colors on the enemy's ramparts. No eulogy passed upon these two gallant men could do them full justice. To me they had both endeared themselves by their noble qualities, and in their deaths I feel as if I had lost two members of my own family. The
he sea, the three divisions of the corps being under command of Generals Carlin, Morgan and Baird, and numbering 13,962 present for duty. The march through Georgia to the sea was an uneventful one, and no fighting occurred. Savannah was occupied December 20th, and in February, 1865, Sherman started on his march through the Carolinas. The Fourteenth Corps, together with the Twentieth, formed the Army of Georgia, General Slocum commanding both corps. On entering the Carolina campaign, February 1, 1865, the Fourteenth reported its strength at 14,420, infantry and artillery, and contained 47 regiments of infantry, with 4 batteries of light artillery. The battle of Bentonville, N. C., occurred March 19, 1865, while oil this campaign. It was a hard fought battle, in which the divisions of Carlin and Morgan, assisted by two brigades from Williams' (Twentieth) Corps, did most all the fighting. This was the last battle in which the corps participated, and the veteran columns marched gayl
ral J. G. Foster, and the Left Wing of Sherman's army under Slocum moved up the Savannah River, accompanied by Kilpatrick, and crossed it at Sister's Ferry. The river was overflowing its banks and the crossing, by means of a pontoon bridge, was effected with the greatest difficulty. The Right Wing, under Howard, embarked for Beaufort, South Carolina, and moved thence to Pocotaligo, near the Broad River, whither Sherman had preceded it, and the great march northward was fairly begun by February 1, 1865. Sherman had given out the word that he expected to go to Charleston or Augusta, his purpose being to deceive the Confederates, since he had made up his mind to march straight to Columbia, the capital of South Carolina. The two wings of the army were soon united and they continued their great march from one end of the State of South Carolina to the other. The men felt less restraint in devastating The men who lived off the country — headquarters guard on the march through Nort
ral J. G. Foster, and the Left Wing of Sherman's army under Slocum moved up the Savannah River, accompanied by Kilpatrick, and crossed it at Sister's Ferry. The river was overflowing its banks and the crossing, by means of a pontoon bridge, was effected with the greatest difficulty. The Right Wing, under Howard, embarked for Beaufort, South Carolina, and moved thence to Pocotaligo, near the Broad River, whither Sherman had preceded it, and the great march northward was fairly begun by February 1, 1865. Sherman had given out the word that he expected to go to Charleston or Augusta, his purpose being to deceive the Confederates, since he had made up his mind to march straight to Columbia, the capital of South Carolina. The two wings of the army were soon united and they continued their great march from one end of the State of South Carolina to the other. The men felt less restraint in devastating The men who lived off the country — headquarters guard on the march through Nort
. Jourdan, Jas., Mar. 13, 1865. Kane, Thos. L., Mar. 13, 1865. Keifer, J. W., April 9, 1865. Kelly, Benj. F., Mar. 13, 1865. Kenly, John R., Mar. 13, 1865. Ketcham, J. H., Mar. 13, 1865. Kiddoo, Jos. B., Sept. 4, 1865. Kimball, Nathan, Feb. 1, 1865. Kingsman, J. B., Mar. 13, 1865. Lanman, J. G., Mar. 13, 1865. Lawler, M. K., Mar. 13, 1865. Long, Eli, Mar. 13, 1865. Loring, Chas. G., July 17, 1865. Lucas, Thos. J., Mar. 26, 1865. Ludlow, Wm. H., Mar. 13, 1865. McAllister, Rbt., Maumbaugh, F. S., Nov. 29, 1862. Sullivan, J. C., April 28, 1862. Sweeney, T. W., Nov. 29, 1862. Taylor, Geo. W., May 9, 1862. Taylor, Nelson, Sept. 7, 1862. Terrill, Wm. R., Sept. 9, 1862. Terry, Henry D., July 17, 1862. Thomas, Stephen, Feb. 1, 1865. Thurston, C. M., Sept. 7, 1861. Todd, John B. S., Sept. 19, 1865. Turchin, John B., July 17, 1862. Tuttle, James M., June 9, 1862. Tyler, Daniel, Mar. 13, 1862. Van Allen, J. H., April 15, 1862. Van Derveer, F., Oct. 4, 1864. Van Wyck
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 3.16 (search)
r armies, if labor is allowed to the various work shops on which it depends, without interruption, if the privilege of detailing contractors under certain circumstances be continued, and the necessary funds are promptly furnished. Without these this department is powerless, and the want of them is fast paralyzing its efforts. Very respectfully, Your obedient servant, (Signed) A. R. Lawton, Quartermaster-General. office of Inspector-General of field transportation, Richmond, February 1st, 1865. General Lawton, Quartermaster-General: Sir — The urgent request of General Lee, made to me in person, and that of his Chief Quartermaster, to be prepared to equip his artillery and transportation with horses, added to the calls made upon me for the same supplies for armies South, induces me to address you this communication, in which I desire to recapitulate what I have before at different times, in writing and verbally, had the honor to submit to you, on the subject of the number
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Annexed Territory, status of. (search)
assing laws to govern the Territories, the keeping and disbursement of Federal taxes derived from the Territories, the veto power, and many other things, are pursued as if the Constitution applied to the cases. But, in theory, it is claimed by these that no part of the Constitution applies except the Thirteenth Amendment, which prohibits slavery, and that only because the prohibition expressly includes any place subject to their jurisdiction. This amendment was proposed by Congress on Feb. 1, 1865--the day on which Sherman's army left Savannah on its northern march; and the words any place subject to their jurisdiction were probably added because of the uncertainty as to the legal status of the States in rebellion, and not because of any doubt as to whether Nebraska, then a Territory, was a part of the United States. The view that some other general limitations of the Constitution upon the powers of Congress lust relate to all regions and all persons was, however, adopted by som
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Constitution of the United States (search)
le number of electors appointed, and if no person have a majority, then from the two highest numbers on the list the Senate shall choose the Vice-President. A quorum for the purpose shall consist of two-thirds of the whole number of senators, and a majority of the whole number shall be necessary to a choice. 3. But no person constitutionally ineligible to the office of President shall be eligible to that of Vice-President of the United States. article XIII: Proposed by Congress Feb. 1. 1865. Ratification announced by Secretary of State, Dec. 18, 1865. section 1. Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime, whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction. section 2. Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation. article XIV: Proposed by Congress June 16, 1866. Ratification announced by Secretary of State, July 2
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