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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 6 6 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 5 5 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 5 5 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 5 5 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 3 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 27, 1865., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The defense of Fort Fisher. (search)
and remarked, Lamb, my boy, I have come to share your fate. You and your garrison are to be sacrificed. I replied, Don't say so, General; we shall certainly whip the enemy again. He then told me that when he left Wilmington General Bragg was hastily removing his stores and ammunition, and was looking for a place to fall back upon. In a report to General Lee, dictated at Fort Fisher January 18th, 1865, and in another inclosing the first one) dated Fort Columbus, New York Harbor, February 19th, 1865, General Whiting blames General Bragg for the loss of Fort Fisher, and asks that the latter's conduct be investigated. He says: I went into the fort with the conviction that it was to be sacrificed, for the last I heard General Bragg say, was to point out a line to fall back on if Fort Fisher fell. General Bragg was charged with the command and defense of Wilmington, by the Secretary of War, on January 13th; and General Whiting concludes with a feeling reference to the fact that he
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The burning of Columbia, South Carolina-report of the Committee of citizens appointed to collect testimony. (search)
edecessor. The same day (18th of February) General Sherman, deposes the Mayor, sent for me. I went to see him about one o'clock. He met me very cordially, and said he regretted very much that our city was burned, and that it was my fault. I asked him how? He said in suffering ardent spirits to be left in the city after it was evacuated, saying: Who could command drunken soldiers? There was no allusion made to General Hampton, to accident, or to cotton. On the succeeding day--Sunday, February 19, 1865--the Mayor and six of the citizens visited General Sherman in order to obtain food for the subsistence of the women and children until communication could be had with the country. General Sherman, upon this occasion, talked much. In the course of his discourse, deposes one of the gentlemen (Edwin J. Scott, Esq.), he referred to the burning of the city, admitting that it was done by his troops, but excusing them because, as he alleged, they had been made drunk by our citizens, one
ructions to Generals Hampton and Stevenson, directing their movements and line of march, and advising necessary measures for the removal of rations at Chesterville. He also forwarded the following message to General Lee: White Oak, Feb. 19th, 1865. General R. E. Lee, Richmond, Va.: General,—After close examination and exerting every means in my power, I find it impossible for the troops now in Charleston to form a junction with me this side of Greensboroa (North Carolina). Believinunite our armies, as, separately, they do not seem able to make head against the enemy. And again: I fear it may be necessary to abandon our cities, and preparations should be made for this contingency. General Lee's communication, of February 19th, 1865, to General Breckinridge, Secretary of War, in Appendix. The only difference between the two generals was, that General Lee saw the necessity of concentration too late, and failed to act upon it; whereas Beauregard saw it much earlier, and
d troops will leave here about daylight in the morning. Respectfully, your obedient servant, Jno. M. Otey, Lieut.-Col., and A. A. G. White Oak, Feb. 19th, 1865. Genl. Braxton Bragg, Wilmington, N. C.: Have ordered McLaws to move as rapidly as possible by rail to Greensboroa, N. C. Please communicate with him fully, and aid him all in your power. Am obliged to you for your information. G. T. Beauregard. White Oak, Feb. 19th, 1865. Genl. L. Mclaws, Charleston, S. C.: Orders for movement to Cheraw countermanded. Send infantry, with due proportion of artillery, by rail to Greensboroa, N. C., as rapidly as possible. Call uponnt must be lost in executing this order. Leave your cavalry to protect country north of Santee River. G. T. Beauregard. Headquarters, Petersburg, Feb. 19th, 1865. His Excellency J. C. Breckinridge, Sec. of War, Richmond, Va.: Sir,—The accounts received to-day from South and North Carolina are unfavorable. General
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles, Florida, 1865 (search)
1865 Feb. 2: Skirmish, St. John's River(No Reports.) Feb. 5: Action, Braddocks' Farm near WelakaFLORIDA--2d Cavalry (Cos. "B," "H"). Union loss, 1 killed, 1 wounded, 34 missing. Total, 36. Feb. 13: Action, Station FourFLORIDA--2d Cavalry. UNITED STATES--2d Colored Infantry. Union loss, 6 killed, 17 wounded, 2 missing. Total, 25. Feb. 16: Skirmish near Cedar KeysUNITED STATES--2d Colored Infantry. Union loss, 6 killed, 3 missing. Total, 9. Feb. 19: Exp. from Barrancas to MiltonMAINE--2d Cavalry. Feb. 20: Attack on Fort MyersFLORIDA--2d Cavalry (Detachment). NEW YORK--110th Infantry (Detachment). UNITED STATES--2d Colored Infantry (Detachment). Union loss, 5 killed, 1 missing. Total, 6. Feb. 21-March 7: Operations near St. Mark'sFLORIDA--2d Cavalry. UNITED STATES--2d and 99th Colored Infantry. Feb. 22-25: Exp. from Barrancas to MiltonMAINE--2d Cavalry. March 4-5: Skirmishes, East River BridgeFLORIDA--2d Cavalry. UNITED STATES--2d Colored Infantry. March 5-6: Skirmishes, Newpor
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles, North Carolina, 1865 (search)
65th and 140th Infantry. KENTUCKY--12th, 16th and 26th Infantry. MICHIGAN--25th Infantry. MAINE 9th Infantry. NEW HAMPSHIRE--4th Infantry. NEW YORK--16th Indpt. Battery Light Arty.; 3d, 47th, 48th, 112th, 115th, 117th, 142d and 169th Infantry. OHIO--Battery "D" 1st Light Arty.; 100th, 103d, 104th and 177th Infantry. PENNSYLVANIA--76th, 97th and 203d Infantry. TENNESSEE--6th and 8th Infantry. Union loss, 10 killed, 50 wounded. Total, 60. Feb. 18: Skirmish, Orton's PondOHIO--104th Infantry. Feb. 19: Capture of Fort AndersonILLINOIS--65th and 112th Infantry. INDIANA--13th, 63d, 65th and 140th Infantry. KENTUCKY--12th, 16th and 26th Infantry. MICHIGAN--25th Infantry. MAINE--9th Infantry. NEW HAMPSHIRE--4th Infantry. NEW YORK--16th Indpt. Battery Light Arty.; 3d, 47th, 48th, 112th, 115th, 117th, 142d and 169th Infantry. OHIO--Battery "D" 1st Light Arty.; 100th, 103d, 104th and 177th Infantry. PENNSYLVANIA--76th, 97th and 203d Infantry. TENNESSEE--6th and 8th Infantry. Feb. 19-20: Skirmi
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles, Virginia, 1865 (search)
1st Cavalry. PENNSYLVANIA--11th Cavalry. Feb. 13-17: Expedition from Edenburg to Little Fort Valley and skirmishesMICHIGAN--1st, 5th, 6th and 7th Cavalry (Detachments). Union loss, 1 killed. Feb. 15-16: Scout from Fairfax Court House to Aldie and MiddleburgILLINOIS--8th Cavalry (Co. "B"). Feb. 18-19: Expedition from Winchester into Loudon CountyNEW YORK--21st Cavalry. PENNSYLVANIA--14th Cavalry (Detachments). Feb. 18-19: Scout in Prince William CountyILLINOIS--8th Cavalry (Detachment). Feb. 19: Skirmish, Ashby's GapNEW YORK--21st Cavalry. PENNSYLVANIA--14th Cavalry (Detachments). Union loss, 6 killed, 19 wounded, 64 missing. Total, 89. Feb. 23-24: Expedition from Yorktown to West PointNEW YORK--16th Heavy Arty. (Co. "M"). Feb. 27-March 2: Expedition from Winchester (Sheridan's)CONNECTICUT--1st Cavalry. MASSACHUSETTS--2d Cavalry. MICHIGAN--1st, 5th, 6th and 7th Cavalry. NEW HAMPSHIRE--1st Cavalry. NEW JERSEY--3d Cavalry. NEW YORK--1st (Lincoln), 2d, 4th, 6th, 8th, 9th, 15th and
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Illinois Volunteers. (search)
mbia, Duck River, November 24-27. Mount Carmel November 28. Franklin November 30. Battle of Nashville December 15-16. Pursuit of Hood to the Tennessee River December 17-28. Brentwood and West Harpeth River December 17. Spring Hill December 18. Franklin Pike, Curtis Creek and Rutherford Creek December 19. Columbia December 20. Lynnville and Richland Creek December 24. Anthony's Gap, near Pulaski, December 25. Expedition from Eastport to Russellsville, Ala., February 19-23, 1865. Tuscumbia February 20. Duty at Huntsville and Florence, Ala., Eastport, Miss., and Gravelly Springs, Ala., till June. Moved to Iuka, Miss., June 23, thence to Decatur, Ala., July 4. To Montgomery and Selma, Ala., thence to Gainesville August 20. Duty in District of Montgomery, Ala., till October. Mustered out at Selma, Ala., October 31, 1865. Regiment lost during service 1 Officer and 45 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 6 Officers and 241 Enliste
mber 17-29. West Harpeth River December 17. Spring Hill December 18. Rutherford Creek and Curtis Creek December 19. Lawrenceburg December 22. Lynnville and Richland Creek December 24. Richland Creek December 25. King's Gap, near Pulaski, December 25. Egypt Station, Miss., December 28 (Co. E ). Tuscumbia February 20, 1865. Duty at Huntsville and Florence, Ala., Eastport, Miss., and Gravelly Springs, Ala., till June, 1865. Expedition to Russellsville, Ala., February 19-23, 1865, and in the Dept. of Mississippi till September. Mustered out September 19, 1865. Regiment lost during service 1 Officer and 59 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 2 Officers and 207 Enlisted men by disease. Total 269. 3rd Iowa Regiment Cavalry Organized at Keokuk August 30 to September 14, 1861. Moved to Benton Barracks, Mo., November 4-6, and duty there till February 4, 1862. (Cos. E, F G and H detached to Jefferson City, Mo., December 12, 1861, and
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Michigan Volunteers. (search)
July 22-August 25. Flank movement on Jonesboro August 25-30. Battle of Jonesboro August 31-September 1. Lovejoy Station September 2-6. Duty near Atlanta till October. Reconnoissance from Rome, on Cavalrye Springs Road, and skirmishes October 12-13. Guard Railroad near Chattanooga, Tenn., till November. Moved to Nashville, Tenn., November 15-18, and duty there till February, 1865. Battle of Nashville December 15-16, 1864 (Reserve). Moved to Chattanooga February 16-19, 1865, and duty there till July. Ordered to Jackson, Michigan, and there mustered out July 22, 1865. Battery lost during service 2 Officers and 3 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 42 Enlisted men by disease. Total 47. Battery I, 1st Michigan Regiment Light Artillery Organized at Detroit, Michigan, and mustered in August 29, 1862. Moved to Washington, D. C., December 4-11. Attached to Camp Berry, Defenses of Washington, to to Triplett's Bridge June 16, 1863. Action
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