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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 13 13 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 6 6 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 5 5 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 5 5 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 4 4 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 4 4 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 2 Browse Search
Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies. 2 2 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 2 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3.. You can also browse the collection for March 28th, 1865 AD or search for March 28th, 1865 AD in all documents.

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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 18: capture of Fort Fisher, Wilmington, and Goldsboroa.--Sherman's March through the Carolinas.--Stoneman's last raid. (search)
a and Tennessee railroad, as far toward Lynchburg as possible. He concentrated the cavalry brigades of Colonels Palmer, Miller, and Brown, of Gillem's division, about six thousand strong, at Mossy Creek, on the 20th of March. He moved eastward to Bull's Gap, where he divided his forces, sending Miller toward Bristol, to make a feint, and moving with the rest of his command to Jonesboroa, when he crossed over Stone Mountain into North Carolina, to Boone. There, after a sharp skirmish, March 28, 1865. he captured two hundred Home Guards. Thence he moved through mountain gaps to Wilkesboroa, where the advance skirmished March 29. and captured prisoners and stores. Continuing his march, he crossed the Yadkin River April 2. at Jonesville, and, turning northward, went on to Cranberry Plain, in Carroll County, Virginia. From that point he sent Colonel Miller to Wytheville, to destroy the railway in that vicinity, and with the main force he moved eastward to Jacksonville, skirmishing
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 19: the repossession of Alabama by the Government. (search)
. Gibson. It was soon found that Spanish Fort proper, with its near neighbors and dependents, Red Fort and Fort Alexis, were stout adversaries to contend with, and were ready and willing to give blow for blow. As the day ad<*> vanced, collisions became warmer and warmer; and, before sunset, there was a tremendous cannonade from besiegers and besieged, and the gunboats of both parties, which was kept up all night, and afforded a magnificent spectacle for the citizens of Mobile. Then March 28, 1865. a siege was formally begun. Canby had established his lines at distances of three hundred and four hundred yards from the fort, and at that short range, pounded it unmercifully. The siege continued a fortnight, during which time the greatest gallantry and fortitude were displayed on both sides. Every day the Nationals mounted new pieces of heavy caliber, until, at length, no less than sixteen mortars, twenty heavy guns, and six field-pieces were brought to bear upon the fort. The