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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 17 17 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 12 12 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 12 12 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 6 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 5 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 4 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 4 4 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 4 4 Browse Search
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Eliza Frances Andrews, The war-time journal of a Georgia girl, 1864-1865, chapter 3 (search)
II. plantation life (January 1-April 3, 1865) explanatory note.-During the period embraced in this chapter the great black tide of destruction that had swept over Georgia turned its course northward from Savannah to break a few weeks later (Feb. 17) in a cataract of blood and fire on the city of Columbia. At the same time the great tragedy of Andersonville was going on under our eyes; and farther off, in Old Virginia, Lee and his immortals were struggling in the toils of the net that was drawing them on to the tragedy of Appomattox. To put forward a trivial narrative of everyday life at a time when mighty events like these were taking place would seem little less than an impertinence, did we not know that it is the ripple mark left on the sand that shows where the tide came in, and the simple undergrowth of the forest gives a character to the landscape without which the most carefully-drawn picture would be incomplete. On the other hand, the mighty drama that was being en
Eliza Frances Andrews, The war-time journal of a Georgia girl, 1864-1865, chapter 4 (search)
III. a race with the enemy (April 3-22, 1865) explanatory note.-There is hardly anything in this chapter but will easily explain itself. The war was virtually over when we left our sister, though we did not know it, and the various raids and forays alluded to in the journal were really nothing but the march of victorious generals to take possession of a conquered country. Communication was so interrupted that we did not hear of the fall of Richmond till the 6th of April, four days after it happened, and no certain news of Lee's surrender reached us till the 20th, eleven days after the event, though we caught vague rumors of it on the 19th. Chunnennuggee Ridge, to which allusion is made in this chapter and the preceding, is a name given to a tall escarpment many miles in length, overlooking the rich prairie lands of South-East Alabama. On top of this bluff the owners of the great cotton plantations in the prairie made their homes, and for some five or six miles north of t
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Army Life in a Black Regiment, chapter 14 (search)
d, May 2, 1863. Jas. B. O'Neil, Promotion, Jan. 10, 1863; Resigned, May 2, 1863. W. W. Sampson, Promotion, Jan. 10, 1863; Captain, Oct. 30, 1863. J. M. Thompson, Promotion, Jan. 27, 1863; Captain, Oct. 30, 1863. R. M. Gaston, Promotion, April 15, 1863; Killed at Coosaw Ferry, S. C., May 27, 1863. Jas. B. West, Promotion, Feb. 28, 1863; Resigned, June 14, 1865. N. G. Parker, Promotion, May 5, 1863; Captain, Feb., 1865. W. H. Hyde, Promotion, May 5, 1863; Resigned, April 3, 1865. Henry A. Stone, 8th Me., June 26, 1863; Resigned, Dec. 16, 1864. J. A. Trowbridge, Promotion, Aug. 11, 1863; Resigned, Nov. 29, 1864. A. W. Jackson, Promotion, Aug. 26, 1863; Captain, April 30, 1864. Chas. E. Parker, Promotion, Aug. 26, 1863; Resigned, Nov. 29, 1864. Chas. W. Hooper, Piomotion, Nov. 8, 1863; Captain, Sept., 1865. E. C. Merriam, Promotion, Nov. 19, 1863; Captain, Sept., 1865. Henry A. Beach, Promotion, April 30, 1864; Resigned, Sept. 28, 1864. E.
s, and batteries vastly too strong for any thing we could command; and so it is still — the enemy is far too strong in numbers and military resources. The Lord save us, or we perish! Many persons think that Richmond is in the greatest possible danger, and may be evacuated at any time. Perhaps we are apathetic or too hopeful, but none of us are desponding at all, and I find myself planning for the future, and feeling excessively annoyed when I find persons less sanguine than myself. April 3, 1865. Agitated and nervous, I turn to my diary to-night as the means of soothing my feelings. We have passed through a fatal thirty-six hours. Yesterday morning (it seems a week ago) we went, as usual, to St. James's Church, hoping for a day of peace and quietness, as well as of religious improvement and enjoyment. How short-sighted we are, and how little do we know of what is coming, either of judgment or mercy The sermon being over, as it was the first Sunday in the month, the sacram
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The colored troops at Petersburg. (search)
ing the charge were being mowed down like grass, with no hope of any one reaching the crest, so I ordered them to scatter and run back. The fire was such that Captain Dempcy and myself were the only officers who returned, unharmed, of those who left the works for that charge. My brigade guidon, which Lieutenant Pennell held when killed, was captured by Private John W. Niles. Company D, 41st Virginia, was stored in Richmond, and there retaken by our troops when we entered that city on April 3d, 1865, and is now stored in the War Department.--H. G. T. We were not long back within the honeycomb of passages and bomb-proofs near the crater before I received this order from the division commander: Colonels Sigfried and Thomas, if you have not already done so, you will immediately proceed to take the crest in your front. My command was crowded into the pits, already too full, and were sandwiched, man for man, against the men of the First Division. They were thus partly sheltered fro
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 20: Peace conference at Hampton Roads.--the campaign against Richmond. (search)
on that shook the City to its foundations, and was heard and felt for many miles around. This was soon followed by another explosion. It was the blowing up of the Confederate ram, Virginia, below the City. At seven o'clock in the morning, April 3, 1865. the retreating troops were all across the stream, when the torch was applied to Mayo's bridge and the railway bridges, and they were burned behind the fugitives. At about the same time, two more Confederate iron-clads (Fredericksburg and Ritaff, were sent, with a small squadron of cavalry, to demand of the mayor, Joseph Mayo, the surrender of the city. They were courteously received, and the keys of the public buildings were handed to them, at the City Hall, at seven o'clock. April 3, 1865. Then they placed two small cavalry guidons on the top of the State Capitol. At eight o'clock, General Weitzel and staff rode in, at the head of Ripley's brigade of negro troops, who had the honor of first entering the late Confederate capit
June 12, 1864 1 Waynesboro, Mch. 2, 1865 1 Hagerstown, July 6, 1863 8 White Oak Swamp, June 14, 1864 1 Petersburg, April 3, 1865 2 Boonsboro, July 9, 1863 2 Malvern Hill, June 15, 1864 2 Appomattox, April 8, 1865 1 Culpeper, Sept. 13, 1863 ve Forks, Va., April 1, 1865 7 Upperville, Va., June 20, 1863 1 Stony Creek, Va., June 28, 1864 2 Deep Creek, Va., April 3, 1865 6 Jones's Cross Roads, Va., July 10, ‘63 2 Ream's Station, Va., June 29, 1864 4 Appomattox, Va., April 8, 1865 2 ve Forks, Va., April 1, 1865 6 Gettysburg, Pa., July 1, 1863 6 Meadow Bridge, Va., May 13, 1864 2 Deep Creek, Va., April 3, 1865 1 Williamsport, Md., July 6, 1863 2 Cold Harbor, Va., June 2, 1864 3 Namozine Church, Va., April 3, ‘65 3 Boonssburg, the regiment — then in Ely's Brigade — was the first to enter the city, its flag appearing on the Court House, April 3, 1865, at 4.28 A. M. A few minutes later, the colors of the Second Michigan, of the same brigade, were unfurled from the C
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 9 (search)
oriously, as it had begun. We went into camp at the Wall house and all preparations were made to cross the river next morning and completely shut in the town. [The preceding letter like many others, was written several days after the events described. The victory was so overwhelming that all Lyman actually wrote home that night was:] Headquarters Army of the Potomac Sunday, April 2, 1865 11 P. M. my dear Mimi:-- the Rebellion has gone up! Theodore Lyman Lt.-Col. & Vol. A. D.C. April 3, 1865 We began our day early, for, about light, I heard Duane say, outside my tent: They have evacuated Petersburg. Sure enough, they were gone, across the river, and, at that very moment, their troops at Richmond, and all along the river, with their artillery and trains, were marching in all haste, hoping to join each other and get to Burkeville Junction, en route for Danville. How they succeeded will be seen in the sequel. General Meade, to my great satisfaction, said he would ride in
armory in the foreground, the pillars of the Petersburg and Richmond Railroad bridge across the James, a few houses in Manchester beyond the stream — this picture of desolation revives the scenes of wild commotion in Richmond on the 2d and 3d of April, 1865. On the 2d, a quiet Sunday, Jefferson Davis, at morning service in St. Paul's Church, received a despatch from General Lee, announcing the imminent fall of Petersburg and the necessity of retreating that night. Mr. Davis left his seat calt was decided to make an effort to cut their way through the Union lines on the morning of the next day. On the 7th while at Farmville, on the south side of the Pursuing Lee to Appomatox. This is a scene near the railroad station on April 3, 1865. Muskets of the Federal troops are stacked in the foreground. Evidences of the long bombardment appear in the picture. The foot-bridge shown in the smaller picture is at the point where the old river road crossed the run west of Old Town C
armory in the foreground, the pillars of the Petersburg and Richmond Railroad bridge across the James, a few houses in Manchester beyond the stream — this picture of desolation revives the scenes of wild commotion in Richmond on the 2d and 3d of April, 1865. On the 2d, a quiet Sunday, Jefferson Davis, at morning service in St. Paul's Church, received a despatch from General Lee, announcing the imminent fall of Petersburg and the necessity of retreating that night. Mr. Davis left his seat calt was decided to make an effort to cut their way through the Union lines on the morning of the next day. On the 7th while at Farmville, on the south side of the Pursuing Lee to Appomatox. This is a scene near the railroad station on April 3, 1865. Muskets of the Federal troops are stacked in the foreground. Evidences of the long bombardment appear in the picture. The foot-bridge shown in the smaller picture is at the point where the old river road crossed the run west of Old Town C
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